Carrara property offers idyllic lifestyle for boaties

first_img123 Witt Ave, Carrara. 123 Witt Ave, Carrara. 123 Witt Ave, Carrara.A STUNNING resort-inspired property in Carrara is set to go under the hammer this weekend.The four-bedroom house at 123 Witt Ave features two living areas and a separate dining space as well as high ceilings and airconditioning.The kitchen has been renovated and has plenty of cupboard space and a new gas cooker and oven.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North11 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoThe main bedroom is ensuited while the laundry is recently renovated.Outside there is a salt water pool with timber decking and palm trees overlooking the waterfront as well as a boat shed and pontoon.Harcourts Coastal agent Shaun Bourke is taking the property to auction on February 11 at 1pm.He said the property offered a family-sized home in a remarkable location with boating and water skiing at your doorstep.last_img read more

Reports of ‘massive results’ in family-friendly hot spot

first_imgMore from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 201916 Castor Rd, Wavell Heights.The renovated property has timber floors, security screens and plantation shutters throughout.Mr Rowland said the new owners planned to move into the house. He said the market was strong in the Wavell Heights area.“We have seen massive results in the last six weeks,” Mr Rowland said. “Buyers want properties around the $750,000 to $1.5 million mark.“They are looking for family homes in the area.” The property, nestled on a 541sq  m block, features an open-plan living/dining area with air conditioning and soaring ceilings which flow out to the outdoor entertaining area.The home is close to schools and parks. 16 Castor Rd, Wavell Heights.A three-bedroom, two-bathroom home at Wavell Heights has sold for $50,000 more than what it was originally listed at.The property at 16 Castor Rd, was bought by a local who did not know the property reappeared on the market.Place – Aspley selling agent Tristan Rowland said there were multiple offers on the home, before it eventually changed hands for $850,000. The property was originally listed with another agency beforehand.last_img read more

Rural riches in little known suburb

first_imgThe Newman’s have just sold their property for $920,000 after buying it six years ago for $570,000. They say even though the property market is tough there is still money to be made. They also reckon Toonpan which offers a semi-rural lifestyle is Townsville’s best kept secret. This is Sharee Newman on the property.THE Newman family’s Toonpan home has become a property success story, selling for $920,000 after they purchased it five years ago for $572,000.Sharee Newman, who lives at 242 Mountview Dve with her husband and two children, says the sale is proof there is still money to be made in Townsville’s downtrodden property market.The family gutted the five-bedroom home during a five-month renovation to create a picture perfect homestead sitting in pride of place on 26ha.Even after completing a six-figure renovation, Mrs Newman said they had come away with a healthy profit.“When we bought it in 2012, it was a bit of a mess and they had renters here at the time,” she said.“It was on the market for a long time and we came back to look at it again and the renters had gone and they had cleaned it out but there was still a lot of water damage. “I was pregnant at the time and I just thought, ‘I can’t do this’, but the previous owners had all the right infrastructure in place so we went ahead and bought it.”The property was sold to a Townsville family with three children who want to be able to enjoy a rural lifestyle. Mrs Newman said well-maintained acreage properties were a rarity in Townsville and she felt that was why it sold for such a high price.“I noticed in Townsville that you don’t see a lot of acreage properties of this size where it’s tidy inside and out and I think there is a real lack of these properties in the market,” she said.“We had overseas interest, interstate interest and the rest was locals.More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020“We’ve kept it well maintained and that’s what really attracted people and within three weeks we had an offer.”The home has a large undercover entertaining area and a six-bay shed, while there is also a dam, bore water, rainwater tank and a pet pig that will be given to the new owners. The dam has been stocked with barramundi and there is a bridge leading to an ­island in the centre of the dam.She said the home had been a rural paradise and they were sad to be leaving to relocate to Victoria. “We get turtles out of the dam that crawl up to the house, we catch barra out of the dam and you get kangaroos hopping about the place,” she said.“The bird life is amazing and you get storks that are as tall as me and they are like a jumbo jet when they fly in. It’s a great home for kids.”The southern suburb of Toonpan is arguably Townsville’s best-kept secret. It offers a rural lifestyle, large lots, mountain views and tranquillity. The suburb, off the Flinders Highway, mainly hosts owner-occupiers and properties rarely come up for sale.McGrath agent Karyn Voevodin, who sold the property, said the price was a reflection of the limited amount of quality acreage on the market.“I’ve got a number of buyers who are still looking for something similar,” she said.last_img read more

Brisbane suburbs that buyers love so much it will take decades for them to leave

first_img 0-5km Herston 17.9South Brisbane 15.9Herston 14.9West End 14.5Auchenflower 14.4Geebung 14.1Petrie Terrace 14 5-10km More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North2 hours agoNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by Eagle Farm 18.5Mansfield 16.5Nathan 15.1McDowall 14.6Tennyson 14.4Bethania 14.2Everton Park 14.0 11-15km Robertson 15.9Macgregor 15.6Bunya 15.5Darra 15.5Wishart 15.3Upper Mount Gravatt 15.2 16-20km Ellen Grove 16Rochedale South 13.7Woodridge 13.4Springwood 12.9Capalaba 12.6 BRISBANE COUNCIL TIGHTEST HELD: Eagle Farm 18.5 years Herston 17.9 yearsMansfield 16.5 yearsEllen Grove 16 years Robertson 15.9 years South Brisbane 15.9 yearsMacgregor 15.6 years (Source: CoreLogic) Ron and Donna Payne have lived in Greater Brisbane’s Bahrs Scrub for over 25 years and only just decided to downsize to the coast. Picture: Annette DewTHESE are the Brisbane suburbs that buyers love the most – where once they get a foothold, it takes about a quarter of a century for them to leave.Two-thirds of suburbs in the Queensland capital region were so tightly held they averaged 10.9 years before their owners put their homes up for sale, with the longest coming out of Bahrs Scrub, 23km from the Brisbane CBD.The suburbs were diverse from inner-ring suburbs of Eagle Farm and Herston to Mansfield, Sheldon, Ellen Grove, Park Ridge and Robertson across the wide middle ring.For those who have been sitting on property for as long as several decades, there could be a windfall ahead though, with land so tight, developers have come knocking in sleepy suburbs.“Changes in zoning can be a motivating factor for developers to start knocking on doors,” Mr Pressley said.Houses in high demand South Brisbane were also among the hardest to get hold of, averaging 15.9 years before owners let them go – which was exactly the same holding period as Coochie Mudlo 32km from the CBD.Buyers agent Simon Pressley of Propertyology said emotion was the strongest driver in those markets – though in some places like the much-maligned Coochie Mudlo market it was more about resale potential.“Mostly people have a strong emotional connection,” he said. “For a person who really aspires to an acreage lifestyle in the capital city, having pursued that dream and achieved it, something really significant has to happen in their life for them to let go of that.”He said for somewhere like Eagle Farm where the average hold period was 18.5 years, it was about lifestyle.“It’s often something they’ve always aspired for and it will take a heck of a lot of effort given multimillion-dollar construction all around and they will stay there until retired.”Ron and Donna Payne were among those who have spent a quarter of a century in one place, buying acreage in Bahrs Scrub 25 years ago. Mr Payne said having children leave home was good timing to put their six bedroom home on the market – complete with tennis court, pool and stunning scenery.Their agent Quy Early of QMT Realty said development was rapidly arriving to the area which had the last acreage between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.“On the other side of the motorway you’ve got huge developments happening with normal suburban blocks and these acreage blocks will be in big demand in future.”He said culture might be playing a role in boosting hold periods in some suburbs, including Mansfield, Macgregor, Wishart and Darra.“Those are everyday, run-of-the-mill Brisbane suburbs. They have the same characteristics north, south and west of the CBD with no unique features. You can’t put finger as to why they’re held longer. Sometimes people of different cultures can stick together but we can’t be certain.”The shortest hold period for property in Brisbane was two years out of Yarrabilba in Logan and 1.8 years at Springfield Central, both places where substantial new development has taken place in recent years. GREATER BRISBANE SUBURBS RESIDENTS DON’T WANT TO LEAVE: Bahrs Scrub (Logan) 25.5 yearsEagle Farm (Brisbane) 18.5 yearsHerston (Brisbane) 17.9 yearsMansfield (Brisbane) 16.5 yearsSheldon (Redland) 16.3 yearsEllen Grove (Brisbane) 16 yearsPark Ridge (Logan) 15.9 yearsRobertson (Brisbane) 15.9 yearsSouth Brisbane (Brisbane) 15.9 yearsCoochie Mudlo Island (Redland) 15.9 yearsMacgregor (Brisbane) 15.6 yearsBunya (Moreton Bay) 15.5 yearsDarra (Brisbane) 15.5 years (Source: CoreLogic)center_img 21-25km Bahrs Scrub 25.5Sheldon 16.3Logan Central 13.5Daisy Hill 12.7Boronia Heights 12.4 (Source: CoreLogic)last_img read more

Home with city views, tennis court and swimming pool fails to sell

first_imgAuctioneer Haesley Cush at the auction of 38 Palmer Street, Windsor on Saturday, February 17, 2018. (AAP Image/Claudia Baxter)ALL the conditions were right for 38 Palmer St, Windsor to sell.It was an unusual property that had sparked plenty of interest from potential buyers.It was a beautiful sunny Brisbane day that helped showcase of charms of the restored Queenslander home in the highly sought after suburb of Windsor. PICTURESQUE: The leafy home boasts city views.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours agoBefore bidding started Mr Cush framed the four-bedroom, two-bathroom home with a pool, tennis court and city views as a home that people would regret not buying. “This is one of those properties that if you miss it, when you drive past it in five years and in ten years and fifteen years and you recall the price you could have paid you will regret the decision, and your passengers will laugh at you,” Mr Cush said. Bidding started at $1.8 million and slowly climbed up above $2 million as three of the five registered bidders showed their hands.Once it reached $2.15 million things slowed down, and after some negotiations a vendor bid raised the price to $2.4 million.After extended deliberations with the vendor, one of the interested bidders said he would go as high as $2.2 million, but this was still too low for the owners to go on the day. DECKSIDE LIVING: The deck has picturesque views.Just what made the property special differed for almost everyone as the auction. One couple from a few streets over said it was more about the size of the block, which at 1215 sqm, was much bigger than most of the homes in the neighbourhood.Another young couple from Newstead said the appeal was about the deck, with its city views, and not in the full-sized tennis court. 38 Palmer St, Windsor has its own tennis court.There were five registered bidders on the day, in among the 40 or so onlookers that came to watch the auction.Yet despite a heated flurry of bids when auctioneer Haesley Cush started the auction at a little past 1pm, it failed to get over the line. Timeless charm.After watching their hopes for an easy sale fall apart, owners Charles and Deb Tyson were still positive they would get a good price for what has been their home for the last 38 years. “We thought we would sell, I guess today was not the day,” Charles said. The couple believed the home was worth the high price because it was in a central part of Brisbane, that unlike almost everything else around it, had not changed much over the last 40 years.“It hasn’t all gone to high rises, and that is the beauty of it,” Deb said.Some of their neighbours had been in the street for longer than them, and generally when a home did come on the market, they said it was older couples like them, who were looking to downsize.Negotiations between the remaining interested parties continued after the auction, and the agent said they were confident it would be sold very soon.last_img read more

Queenslanders to be 5m strong within weeks, and real estate is set to reap the rewards

first_imgPopulation surges have put greater pressure on areas like the Gold and Sunshine Coasts especially. Picture: NIGEL HALLETT.QUEENSLAND will hit the magic five million headcount in May, official figures show, a milestone helped by a surge in births and migration – putting real estate in the crosshairs.ABS demography director Anthony Grubb said the state had hit 4.9m by the end of September last year and was growing at 1.7 per cent, helped along by the likes of 12,000 New South Welsh people crossing the border last year alone.“Natural increase and net overseas migration each added an additional 31,000 people to the state’s population in the year preceding September 2017,” he said. “The third component, net interstate migration, contributed 19,000 over the same period, including a net flow of 12,000 from New South Wales.”At the turn of the 20th century (1901), there were half a million Queenslanders, and it took 37 years to double that figure and another 36 to then go to two million in 1974.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus20 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market20 hours agoThe Commonwealth Games in April is set to see Queensland attract even more attention from a worldwide audience. Picture: NIGEL HALLETT“After that, population growth picked up its pace, taking only 18 years to get to three million in 1992, and just 14 years to reach four million in 2006.”Real Estate Institute of Queensland chairman Rob Honeycombe said $54b worth of properties changed hands in the state last year.“Our popularity means demand for housing is growing and this is good news for some of our weaker markets such as the inner Brisbane apartment market and regional Queensland.“Of course, there are pockets where housing supply is tight and this population growth is placing pressure on markets such as the Sunshine Coast and the Gold Coast, where prices are rising steady and vacancy rates are at historic lows.”He welcomed the northern migration by NSW residents.“We have known for some time that many southerners are also moving to regional Queensland, seeking a peaceful lifestyle change. Downsizers and pre-retirees are selling their Sydney property to move to regional coastal towns, such as Bundaberg and the Fraser Coast, to buy waterfront property and a great lifestyle.”FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOKlast_img read more

Aspley homes are being snapped up by interstate investors

first_imgThis home at 44 Pie St, Aspley, sold for $638,000.Interstate investors are buying up in Aspley as they see decent rental returns.This home at 44 Pie St sold to interstate investors for $638,000, and LJ Hooker Stafford principal Richard Mirosch said they had 26 groups view the property over two weekends, with four written offers received.“The four written offers consisted of three investors and one owner-occupier,” Mr Mirosch said.“Usually it’s the other way around.”More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019Investors are seeing great rental return in Aspley.Mr Mirosch believes investors are drawn to homes like 44 Pie St, because they can be rented out without much work having to be done.“The house was immaculate and they could rent it straight away,” he said.“It’s location to the shops was also a big drawcard, with Chermside within a couple of kilometres.” Homes that are tidy are more quick to sell.He said the sale was in line with the local market due to the condition of the home.“If something is in good condition with great street appeal, there will be a lot of demand.“You don’t get the same demand for places that need to be painted and have shabby carpet.”last_img read more

X2000 to China

first_imgA SEVEN-car X2000 tilting trainset was dispatched from the Adtranz works in Västerås on January 14 for a two-year demonstration programme in China. Due to arrive next month, the train is being sent under an agreement between Adtranz and the semi-autonomous Guangshen Railway Corp. After commissioning, the X2000 is due to run at 200 km/h between Guangzhou and Kowloon.Through running cannot start until the completion of 25 kV 50Hz electrification between Guangzhou and the Hong Kong SAR border at Lo Wu, which is running behind schedule. The same day Kowloon – Canton Railway announced that its KTT double-deck trainset would enter service at the end of January on a temporary express shuttle between Kowloon and Lo Wu, as it cannot run through to Guangzhou before the end of the year. olast_img read more