Team India manager questions Anushka Sharma’s stay with Virat Kohli

first_imgSunil Dev said that wife’s are ok but girlfriends accompanying cricketers on tours is against Indian cultureThe debate of wives and girlfriends (WAGs) accompanying cricketers on foreign tours has taken a different twist after Team India’s manager Sunil Dev questioned actress Anushka Sharma’s stay with boyfriend Virat Kohli during the India vs England Test series.Once termed as the most eligible bachelor of Team India, under-performing Virat Kohli has now come under severe criticism for his Test failure — 134 runs in 5 matches. Many fans and some quarters of BCCI have blamed Anushka Sharma’s presence behind the vice-captain’s poor form with the bat in a series, which India lost 1-3.BCCI’s decision to allow the Bollywood actress to stay with the cricketer has snowballed into a controversy after Dev just stopped short of saying that wife’s are ok but girlfriends on tours was against the culture of the country.”I didn’t know who gave this permission and from where it was supposed to be taken. Whether this was been done before or not I am not aware of it. But I will definitely speak to the BCCI about what I feel and submit my report,” Dev told ‘Times Now’.Asked whether girlfriends travelling with the players on tour was against Indian culture, Dev said: As you said yes I agree with you. But I won’t make any comment until I meet Board members.”I am bound with a contract with the Board.”Virat Kohli and Anushka Sharma have been grabbing headlines ever since they were first spotted together during the tour of New Zealand. During the England series, the couple were back in the news when it was reported that the actress was staying in the same hotel as Virat Kohli with permission from the BCCI.advertisementlast_img read more

Cochlear implant

first_imgInformationA cochlear implant is a small electronic device that helps people hear. It can be used for people who are deaf or very hard of hearing. A cochlear implant is not the same thing as a hearing aid. The device is surgically implanted and works in a different way.There are many different types of cochlear implants. However, they made up of several similar parts. One part is implanted into the bone around the ear (temporal bone) using surgery. It is made up of a receiver-stimulator. This part of the device accepts, decodes, and then sends an electrical signal to the brain.The second part of the cochlear implant is outside the ear. It is made up of a microphone/receiver, a speech processor, and an antenna. This part of the device receives the sound, changes the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to the inside part of the implant.WHO USES A COCHLEAR IMPLANT?Cochlear implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. To some degree, these devices allow deaf people to “hear.” It is important to note that these devices do not restore normal hearing. They are tools that allow sound and speech to be processed and sent to the brain.Both children and adults can be candidates for cochlear implants. They may have been born deaf or became deaf after learning to speak. Children as young as 1 year old are now candidates for this surgery. The basis for selection may vary slightly from adults to children. The basic guidelines are:advertisementThe person should be completely or almost completely deaf in both ears, and get very little help from hearing aids. Anyone who can hear well enough with hearing aids is not a good candidate for cochlear implants.The patient needs to be highly motivated. After the cochlear implant is placed, the person must learn how to use the device.The patient needs to know what kind of hearing improvement should be expected after surgery. The device does not restore or create “normal” hearing.Children need to be enrolled in programs that help them learn how to process sound.Before being considered for the implant, the patient must have an exam by an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) doctor (otolaryngologist). Patients will also need specific types of hearing tests that are done with their hearing aids on. This may include a CT scan or MRI scan of the brain and the middle and inner ear.Patients (especially children) may need psychological evaluation to determine if they are good candidates.HOW IT WORKSIn a normal ear, sounds are transmitted through the air, causing the eardrum and then the middle ear bones to vibrate. This sends a wave of vibrations into the inner ear (cochlea). These waves are then converted by the cochlea into electrical signals, which are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain.A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant attempts to replace the function of the inner ear by turning sound into electrical energy. This energy can then be used to stimulate the cochlear nerve (the nerve for hearing), sending “sound” signals to the brain.Most cochlear implantshave similar parts.Sound is picked up by a microphone worn near the ear. This sound is sent to a speech processor usually connected to the microphone and worn behind the ear.The sound is analyzed and converted into electrical signals, which are sent to a surgically implanted receiver behind the ear.The receiver sends the signal through a wire into the inner ear. From there, the electrical impulses are sent to the brain.HOW IT IS IMPLANTEDDuring the surgery:You will be asleep and pain free during this surgery.A surgical cut is made behind the ear. You may need some of your hair shaved behind your ear. A microscope and bone drill are used to open the bone behind the ear (mastoid bone) to allow the inside part of the implant to be inserted.The electrode array is passed into the inner ear (cochlea).The receiver is placed into a pocket created behind the ear. The pocket helps keep it in place, and makes sure it is close enough to the skin to allow electrical information to be sent from the device. A “well” may be drilled into the bone behind the ear so the implant is less likely to move under the skin.After surgery:There will be stitches behind the ear.You may be able to feel the receiver as a bump behind the ear.Any shaved hair should grow back.The outside part of the device will be placed 1to 4 weeks after surgery to give the opening time to heal.RISKS OF SURGERYadvertisementMost of the time, a cochlear implant is a safe surgery. However, all surgeries pose some risks. Common risks include:Wound healing problemsSkin breakdown over the implanted deviceInfection near implant siteThese are problems are rare now that the surgery can be done through only a small cut.Less common complications include:Damage to the nerve that moves the face on the side of the operationLeakage of the fluid around the brain (cerebrospinal fluid)Infection of the fluid around the brain (meningitis)Temporary dizziness (vertigo)Failure of the device to workAbnormal tasteRECOVERY AFTER SURGERYFollowing your operation:You may be admitted to the hospital to be watched overnight. (Many hospitals now let patientsgo home the day of surgery.)Your health care provider will give you pain medicines. You may also get antibiotics to prevent infection.Many surgeons place a large dressing over the operated ear. The dressing is removed the day after surgery.A week or more after surgery, the outside part of the cochlear implant is secured to the receiver-stimulator that was implanted behind the ear. It is only at this point that you will be able to use the device.The implantwill beattached to the outside processor when the surgeryis healed. You will begin to work with specialists to learn to “hear” and process sound using the cochlear implant. These specialists may include:AudiologistsSpeech therapistsEar, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists)Working with the specialists after surgery is a key part of the process. You will need to make a joint effort with your health care team to get the most benefit from the implant.OUTLOOKResults with cochlear implants vary widely. How well you do depends on:The condition of the hearing nerve before surgeryYour mental abilitiesThe device being usedThe length of time you were deafThe surgerySome patients can learn to communicate on the telephone. Others can only recognize sound. Getting themost results can take up to several years. You need to be motivated. Patients are often enrolled in hearing and speech rehabilitation programs.LIVING WITH AN IMPLANTOnce you have healed, you may need to make some changes.Most activities are OK. However, some health care providers recommend avoiding full-contact sports. This isto lessen the chance of trauma to the implanted device.Most patients with cochlear implants cannot get MRI scans, because the implant is made of metal.ReferencesBalkany TJ, Brown KD, Gantz BJ. Cochlear implantation: Medical and surgical considerations. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2010:chap 159.Brown KD, Balkany TJ. Benefits of bilateral cochlear implantation: a review. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2007;15:315-318.Papsin BC, Gordon KA. Cochlear implants for children with severe-to-profound hearing loss. N Engl J Med. 2007;357:2380-2387.advertisementSparreboom M, van Schoonhoven J, van Zanten BG, et al. The effectiveness of bilateral cochlear implants for severe-to-profound deafness in children: a systematic review. Otol Neurotol. 2010 Sep;31(7):1062-71.Review Date:5/21/2013Reviewed By:Ashutosh Kacker, MD, BS, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Associate Attending Otolaryngologist, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more

LEVEL 4 REFEREES PRESENTERS

first_imgEvery now and again people achieve remarkable things in our sport, but very rarely do they receive recognition for their achievements. Over the past few weeks four people have gained their level 4 referee presenter status, Chris Harapa, Erene Devall, Scott Dews and Michael Rush. On the database of referee presenters there are only 100 people who have ever achieved this level and this award. Because of their remarkable achievement, we decided to take some time to focus on them and their involvement as Touch referees. Recently I asked each of them some questions about their involvement with Touch, what they love, what’s tough and what they see as the future of refereeing… CHRIS HARAPA: 1) When did you first start Touch refereeing and how long have you been refereeing? I first started refereeing about 1990 down at the Domain lunchtime competition in Sydney as a duty ref, before a friend suggested that I take it more seriously as I was a better ref than a player. I joined South Sydney Referees the following year and they helped me get my level 1. I had lots of help then because some of the best refs then officiated at Souths; Adam Foley, Gary Mournehis, Richard Lawry, Mark Sinclair (all level 6’s & still involved in the sport). I stopped refereeing 3 years ago due to nerve damage in my back and am currently a member of the NSW Referees Panel. 2) What makes refereeing difficult? The speed & intensity of the game as well as the different standards across the park. Referees also devote a lot of time and money to the sport and this makes it hard for them and their families. 3) What do you enjoy about refereeing? When I refereed it was the great camaraderie and friendships that will last a lifetime. Even now as a panel member, the buzz and excitement of a tournament and seeing everyone puts a smile on my face. Also the challenge of improving, attaining higher badge levels and getting better quality games. 4) When did you become interested in other aspects, such as referee presenting/coaching/observing? I had no choice in giving up refereeing because I was forced to give it away, but when the Director of Referees, Ian Matthew invited me to assist the panel for the first time, I jumped at the chance to stay involved and give something back. Presenting and coaching is all part of the job, and I love it. 5) What levels have you achieved in these areas? As a referee, I attained my Level 4 State badge. As a referees’ coach, I am now a level 3 and hope one day to get that L4 at a national tournament. As a presenter, L4 as you now know. I’m also a level 1 player coach. 6) What has been the highlight of your career? Any great memorable moments? Achieving my L4 state badge and getting that blue blazer. An unbelievable semi final game at the State Cup in 1996 between the two best Womens’ sides at the time, Easts v Cronulla which went down to 3 on 3 and helped me get my level 4 badge. Also, you can’t beat our Referees’ Grading Night when you see the smile on a referee’s face when they receive their blue blazer and you helped them get there! 7) Who has been a positive influence for you? All my fellow referees through the years, the NSW Referees Panel, Ian Matthew (Director), my daughter Leah who is an inspiration (I got her involved from the age of 9 and she still loves playing now at 20), my son and best mate Dan, and my wife Megan as she is the one that encourages me and helps me to stay in Touch. 8) What do you see in the future for Touch refereeing in Australia? I can see a bright future ahead. Being associated with so many people that are happy to give up their time and energy as well as a genuine love for what they do, we will only get better in what we do. We are continually developing improving and delivering our courses on a regular basis as well as providing our senior and experienced referees a means to becoming coaches & presenters to help in the development of our junior, female & emerging referees. ERENE DEVALL: 1) When did you first start Touch refereeing and how long have you been refereeing? I started in Kiama, NSW playing in 1980 and started refereeing as a L1 in 1983 (a life time ago) 2) What makes refereeing difficult? Its not difficult it just has lots of challenges. 3) What do you enjoy about refereeing? The people you meet from all walks of life 4) When did you become interested in other aspects, such as referee presenting/coaching/observing? When I started going through the levels as a referee. I have always been someone that likes to give something back – quite a few people helped me along the way – now its my turn. I also get a buzz out of seeing the people you help achieve their goals too. 5) What levels have you achieved in these areas? L4 Referee (retired when I became pregnant with my first child) L4 Coach and now L4 Presenter 6) What has been the highlight of your career? Any great memorable moments? Coaching a great friend of mine through the system from L1 through to L6 referee and being present when he received his L6 at NTL. Too many highlights to mention one in particular – there have been so many. 7) Who has been a positive influence for you? My husband has been the one to support and encourage me to achieve as I have, however, on the Touch Scene there are four people that have had the greatest influence on my career – Greg West, Ian Matthew, Lou Tomkins and Steve Fisher – they are part of the reason I stay involved. 8) What do you see in the future for Touch refereeing in Australia? I would like to see refereeing promoted as a sport within a sport – you either hate it or love it, there is no middle ground. I think that it does take a special type of person to become a Touch Referee. Within my career, thankfully, the highs definitely outweigh the lows. SCOTT DEWS: 1) When did you first start Touch refereeing and how long have you been refereeing? I have been refereeing since the early 90’s, I became more involved & committed when I watched my wife playing rep Touch and realised I could ref at that level. I did my first tournament in ’94. 2) What makes refereeing difficult? During my time when I stopped playing and concentrated on refereeing full time, the park players in open grades basically ran the games, until I gained their respect. Now the only difficult ones are the long term players, who still need the older rules to recover (Mainly women). 3) What do you enjoy about refereeing? To me being able to be involved in high level Touch games e.g.; Mens open NTL, Mens 20’s World Cup) is all the motivation I need. 4) When did you become interested in other aspects, such as referee presenting/coaching/observing? We need a level 1 coaching qualification to gain our state level badges, it was something I enjoyed, passing on information and assistance to developing referees.(My career now is adult training). 5) What levels have you achieved in these areas? I gained my level 6 at NTL’s ’03 and from that and State of Origin I was invited to referee at the Youth World Cup in ’05. 6) What has been the highlight of your career? Any great memorable moments? Gaining the level 6 and then refereeing at the Youth World Cup in 2005. 7) Who has been a positive influence for you? Ian Mathew and his panel have most definitely influenced my career. Ken Golden from this panel more than others, as he was the one that made me realise, I was the only one who could control my career as a referee. 8) What do you see in the future for Touch refereeing in Australia? There is now a new system for referees to follow which will bring more female and younger referees into Touch, this can only make it stronger. MICHAEL RUSH: 1) When did you first start Touch refereeing and how long have you been refereeing? I’ve been refereeing since 1991. 2) What makes refereeing difficult? Players not knowing the key rules & the minority who think its open season on refs on the field. 3) What do you enjoy about refereeing? The constant challenge during the game. You’re more involved in the game than as a player – or maybe that was just a problem with my playing! 4) When did you become interested in other aspects, such as referee presenting/coaching/observing? As part of the refs team at a local venue, you find that after a while you have the opportunity to offer support to new refs. Getting injured and not being able to ref as much also played a key role for me later on. 5) What levels have you achieved in these areas? Level 4 Presenter, Level 3 Referee Coach. 6) What has been the highlight of your career? Any great memorable moments? The memorable moments are when one of the refs you know achieves a goal (a Badge, or a level of game); but also when you see someone new come through and start to show interest in refereeing. 7) Who has been a positive influence for you? One of our Refs Directors here, when I started refereeing, got me interested in sticking with refereeing and having a look at the coordinating and coaching side. More recently getting to work with some of the senior referee coaches. Also, the refs you organise courses and coaching for – a lot of really dedicated people. 8) What do you see in the future for Touch refereeing in Australia? Very positive things. The arm of the sport continues to develop in terms of technical support offered. Refereeing offers a great challenge. The Presenters and Coaching qualifications offer the opportunity to set and achieve goals during and after your on-field career. Once again Touch Football Australia would like to take the opportunity to thank these referees for their contribution to refereeing and the development of our current and future Touch referees at all levels of the sport. We would also like to congratulate them on their own personal achievements and wish them all the best in their future endeavors. By Rachel Moylelast_img read more

10 months agoZola confirms Chelsea watching Bournemouth striker Wilson

first_imgZola confirms Chelsea watching Bournemouth striker Wilsonby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveGianfranco Zola has confirmed Chelsea’s interest in Callum Wilson.The Bournemouth striker has scored nine goals across all competitions this season, with reports stating the Blues were contemplating a move for the 26-year-old.And speaking before Chelsea take on Bournemouth in the EFL Cup quarterfinal, Zola said the club were interested in the England international.”I’m sure that there are a lot of players that are linked with us,” the Blues assistant said.”Certainly Callum Wilson is doing very well for his club and he is of interest, not just for us, but for many.”He’s strong, fast, and he sees the goal. I like him because he’s quick, but also strong in the air, which is a very important quality.”But I don’t want to go too much into it. He’s doing very well. I’m pleased for him. He has a lot of qualities that can take him a long way.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoArsenal boss Emery: We can only make loan signings

first_imgArsenal boss Emery: We can only make loan signingsby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal manager Unai Emery has confirmed the club will only sign loan players this month. The Gunners want to bring Barcelona midfielder Denis Suarez to the Emirates, but are reluctant to part with a fee for the 25-year-old. And Emery has confirmed the club are only looking for temporary signings.”We cannot sign anyone permanently,” Emery said ahead of the Gunners’ game against West Ham on Saturday. “Only loan players this January.”Asked specifically about Suarez, Emery added: “I do not know his situation.”But I know the club is working for the possibility of players who can help us with this condition (on loan).” TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Regional District lifts some evacuation alerts for Old Fort

first_imgThose properties are:7711 Old Fort Road7587 Old Fort Road9913 240 Road7131 265 Road7219 265 Road9808 240 Road9840 240 Road9860 240 Road9878 240 Road9914 240 Road9936 240 Road9940 240 RoadHere is a map of all the properties that remain under an evacuation order or an evacuation alert.A map of the current evacuation orders and alerts as of October 29, 2018Westrek Geotechnical said last week some residents of the Old Fort could return home once the road into the community is finished.  The final geotechnical report on the slide should be completed by the middle of this week.  The report was supposed to be finished last week, but a large amount of new data from the Province was given to Westrek on Wednesday.Once the PRRD receives the geotechnical report, the report will then be sent for a peer and legal reviews.  From there, the PRRD will determine the next steps for residents of the Old Fort. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Peace River Regional District has lifted the evacuation alert for twelve properties near the Old Fort and lifted the evacuation order for one property.The majority of the evacuation order remains in place, but as of 3 p.m. Monday, the PRRD has downgraded the evacuation order to an alert for the property at 9819 240 road.  The property is located above the slide.The evacuation alert for twelve properties, listed below, was also lifted Monday afternoon.last_img read more

Anger more harmful for older adults

first_imgAnger is more harmful than sadness for older adults and may lead to health complications – potentially increased inflammation which is associated with chronic illnesses like heart disease, arthritis and cancer, say researchers. The recently conducted research shows that anger can lead to the development of chronic illnesses whereas sadness did not. “Sadness may help older seniors adjust to challenges such as age-related physical and cognitive declines because it can help them disengage from goals that are no longer attainable”, said study lead author Meaghan A Barlow from the Concordia University in the US. For the study, the researchers analysed data from 226 older adults ages 59 to 93 from Montreal, Canada and grouped participants as being in early old age (59 to 79 years old) or advanced old age (80 years or older). During the study, participants completed questionnaires about how angry or sad they felt. The research examined whether anger and sadness contributed to inflammation. “We found that experiencing anger daily was related to higher levels of inflammation and chronic illness for people aged 80 or above, but not for younger seniors,” added the research co-author Carsten Wrosch. The researchers suggest that education and therapy might help older adults reduce anger by regulating their emotions or by offering better coping strategies to manage the inevitable changes that accompany ageing.last_img read more

Mutiny in House of Saud King Salman clipping wings of Crown Prince

first_img CIA Concludes Saudi Prince Personally Ordered Jamal Khashoggis Death IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:00/1:31Loaded: 0%0:01Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-1:31?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Missing journalist Jamal KhashoggiANIRecently US senators accused the kingdom of a series of misdeeds, adding that the Crown Prince has gone “full gangster.”  The US lawmakers — Republicans and Democrats — also slammed the kingdom for the way it handled the civil war in Yemen as well as the series of alleged human rights abuses.”He is reckless, he’s ruthless, he has a penchant for escalation, for taking high risks, confrontational in his foreign policy approach and I think increasingly willing to test the limits of what he can get away with the United States,” Senator Marco Rubio said. Saudi crown prince Mohammad bin Salman said that the Israelis have the right to own their land.ReutersIf reports doing the rounds are true there is a widening rift between Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and his father, King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud. The enfant terrible of the Al Saud dynasty has had a rather unchecked run so far as ‘King in everything but name’. However, the 33-year-old’s stranglehold on Saudi Arabia is on the wane, multiple reports have said.Prince Mohammad invited worldwide condemnation and infamy after the brutal killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Turkey last year. His role in spearheading the bitter and destructive war on Yemen was also widely criticised. Of late, the Saudi King was also disturbed about the draining of investment from Saudi Arabia in the aftermath of the Khashoggi murder. Salman revokes crown prince’s key powersThe Guardian newspaper reported on Monday that King Salman has stripped the crown prince of some crucial powers. The ageing and ailing king made the move after the crown prince stretched his powers as the deputy king thin when his father was on an official visit to Egypt last month, the paper reported. It is extremely rare for a crown prince to use his temporary powers as the deputy king during the monarch’s absence, but MBS moved swiftly to announce key appointments when the king was travelling. He promoted his sister as the kingdom’s envoy to Washington and appointed his brother in the defence ministry. Sources told the British newspaper that both the appointments were done without the king’s approval. Saudi Arabia’s King Salman attends a Memorandum of Understanding signing ceremony in Putrajaya, Malaysia February 27, 2017. [Representational Image]Reuters fileThe King’s Egypt visit was marred by lurking fears of a possible coup against the ageing monarch. The fears were so palpable that the King removed his security detail midway through the foreign jaunt and brought in a 30-member team of handpicked loyalists from Riyadh.To make matters worse, the all powerful crown prince did not turn up at the airport to welcome back the King. This is an age old custom, the flouting of which sends out signals of grave crisis within the royal household. The crown prince’s absence at the airport was followed by his no-show at key meetings subsequently. The most glaring act of defiance was his absence at a key cabinet meeting presided over by the King. The crown prince was then summoned again for another cabinet meeting in which the king apparently detailed changes in the power structure. However, Prince Mohammad skipped this meeting too, Saudi sources told the paper. The report also lays down instances wherein the crown prince’s absence attracted attention. He did not turn up when important foreign dignitaries from Russia, India, China and Lebanon visited Riyadh. Middle East observers have also pointed out that the crown prince has not made any formal appearance in a fortnight. However, it remains a fact that MBS has remained unseen for longer. Around May last year, the prince’s continued absence at public events had given rise to wild rumours about his death or serious injury. The whole saga started with the shooting down of a drone in Riyadh on April 21 last year, which was interpreted as a coup attempt aimed at the crown prince. When MBS didn’t make any public appearance for weeks on end after this, Iranian media kick-started the death rumours. He is reckless, he’s ruthless, he has a penchant for escalation, for taking high risks, confrontational in his foreign policy approach and I think increasingly willing to test the limits of what he can get away with the United States Close MBS gone ‘full gangster'”At least two bullets have hit bin Salman in April 21 clashes in Riyadh and it is even possible that he is dead,” wrote Iran’s Kayhan newspaper. ‘There is plenty of evidence to suggest that the absence of nearly 30 days of Muhammad bin Sulman, the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, is due to an incident which is being hidden from the public,’ it claimed. Something that added fuel to the death rumours was the fact that the crown prince gave a miss to important diplomatic events like the high profile visit of US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.last_img read more

India Pakistan schools close as smog envelopes

first_imgIndian activists wear facemasks to protect them from pollution during a mask distribution drive at the roadside in New Delhi on Thursday. AFPSchools closed across large swathes of north India on Thursday as a hazardous fog of toxic pollution cloaked the region for a third day, with growing calls for urgent government action to tackle what doctors are calling a public health emergency.Punjab’s government said it was closing all 25,000 schools in the state for the rest of the week due to the acrid air blanketing north India and parts of neighbouring Pakistan.The decision came a day after Delhi authorities ordered all 6,000 schools in the capital to shut until Sunday.Low winds and the annual post-harvest burning of crop stubble in Punjab and neighbouring areas have caused the levels of dangerous pollutants in the air to spike to many times the levels considered safe.Air quality typically worsens before the onset of winter as cooler air traps pollutants near the ground and prevents them from dispersing into the atmosphere, a phenomenon known as inversion.Figures on the US embassy website showed levels of PM2.5 — the smallest particulates that cause most damage to health — spiked at over 1,000 on Wednesday afternoon in Delhi, though by Thursday they had fallen to 590.The World Health Organization’s guidelines say 25 is the maximum level of PM2.5 anyone can safely be exposed to over a 24-hour period.Doctors say the microscopic particles can penetrate deep into the lungs, increasing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.”Delhi once again has become a veritable gas chamber with denizens finding it difficult to breathe,” The Times of India said Thursday, joining growing calls for government action to curb the chronic pollution, which the Indian Medical Association this week termed a public health emergency.”Air pollution during winter months has become a catastrophe for large parts of north India,” the country’s most read English-language newspaper said in an editorial blaming “political apathy”.”It’s high time the question is asked: why can’t authorities enjoying jurisdiction over the national capital of an aspiring great power… come up with concrete measures to tackle the world’s worst air pollution.”As pressure mounted on the government, authorities in Delhi ordered a ban on all construction work and barred lorries from entering the city.Around 50,000 mostly diesel-fuelled lorries pass through India’s capital every night and they are a major contributor to the pollution plaguing the city.- Struggling to respond -It is the second year running that Delhi — now the world’s most polluted capital with air quality worse than Beijing — has faced such high levels of PM2.5.Media reports said the thick smog had also led to a series of road accidents in north India.Eight students were killed late Wednesday when a truck ploughed into them as they waited for a bus on a roadside in Punjab.Since 2014, when WHO figures showed the extent of the crisis, authorities in Delhi have closed power plants temporarily and experimented with taking some cars off the road.But the temporary measures have had little effect.Under pressure to respond, Delhi’s Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal on Thursday sought to blame stubble burning by farmers in neighbouring states.”We we will continue facing this every year until the neighbouring state governments resolve the issue of crop burning,” he told reporters in Delhi.The practice of burning crop stubble remains commonplace in north India despite an official ban.Kejriwal said his government would decide in the next day or two whether to reintroduce restrictions on driving cars in the city.last_img read more

CEC asks magistrates to act neutrally

first_imgChief election commissioner KM Nurul Huda. File photoChief election commissioner (CEC) KM Nurul Huda on Monday urged judicial magistrates to act neutrally to gain people’s confidence and ensure a fair election, reports UNB.”You must be free and fair as you are the judges. You’ll have to apply your judicious minds,” said KM Nurul Huda while briefing the judicial magistrates at election office in Agargaon.The CEC asked the magistrates to perform their duties as per the constitution and law.He said, the election commission is accountable to the nation, constitution, political parties and public for holding a fair election.Some 600 magistrates will perform duty from 29 December to 1 January to ensure a fair election atmosphere, Nurul Huda further said.Election commissioner Mahbub Alam said, it is their aim to make sure no candidate goes to the Jatiya Sangsad without confirming their win through votes.Election commissioners Rafiqul Islam, Kabita Khanam, brigadier (retd) Shahadat Hossain and EC secretary Helaluddin Ahmed also spoke at the briefing.last_img read more