STATE REP RACE Candidate Mark Kratman Discusses His Campaign For State Rep

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Your Tewksbury Today Editor Bill Gilman recently interviewed 19th Middlesex State Representative Candidate Mark Kratman (D-Tewksbury).Kratman answers the following questions:What made you decide that this was the right time to run for State Rep?Have you had to work to get yourself known in the Wilmington part of the district?Respond to a recent Patch article highlighting the fact that several builders and developers contributing to your campaign.If you do get elected, how will you be effective for your district without getting into the “cesspool” of Beacon Hill?What are your feelings on the “Millionaire’s Tax?”What is your opinion on sanctuary states and sanctuary cities?What would you like to see the state legislature do to help communities relative to the opioid epidemic and where detox facilities and sober homes should be located?Where can people find out more about you and your campaign?Listen to the 45-minute interview, courtesy of Your Tewksbury Today, below.——Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE: Voting Records Show Prinzivalli Voted Only Once Before Launching Candidacy; Campaign DisputesIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Mark Kratman Holds Successful Campaign Rally, Ready To Fight For Wilmington & Tewksbury At State HouseIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Committee To Elect Mark Kratman Expresses Disappointment With Robertson Campaign’s TacticsIn “Government”last_img read more

India Pakistan schools close as smog envelopes

first_imgIndian activists wear facemasks to protect them from pollution during a mask distribution drive at the roadside in New Delhi on Thursday. AFPSchools closed across large swathes of north India on Thursday as a hazardous fog of toxic pollution cloaked the region for a third day, with growing calls for urgent government action to tackle what doctors are calling a public health emergency.Punjab’s government said it was closing all 25,000 schools in the state for the rest of the week due to the acrid air blanketing north India and parts of neighbouring Pakistan.The decision came a day after Delhi authorities ordered all 6,000 schools in the capital to shut until Sunday.Low winds and the annual post-harvest burning of crop stubble in Punjab and neighbouring areas have caused the levels of dangerous pollutants in the air to spike to many times the levels considered safe.Air quality typically worsens before the onset of winter as cooler air traps pollutants near the ground and prevents them from dispersing into the atmosphere, a phenomenon known as inversion.Figures on the US embassy website showed levels of PM2.5 — the smallest particulates that cause most damage to health — spiked at over 1,000 on Wednesday afternoon in Delhi, though by Thursday they had fallen to 590.The World Health Organization’s guidelines say 25 is the maximum level of PM2.5 anyone can safely be exposed to over a 24-hour period.Doctors say the microscopic particles can penetrate deep into the lungs, increasing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.”Delhi once again has become a veritable gas chamber with denizens finding it difficult to breathe,” The Times of India said Thursday, joining growing calls for government action to curb the chronic pollution, which the Indian Medical Association this week termed a public health emergency.”Air pollution during winter months has become a catastrophe for large parts of north India,” the country’s most read English-language newspaper said in an editorial blaming “political apathy”.”It’s high time the question is asked: why can’t authorities enjoying jurisdiction over the national capital of an aspiring great power… come up with concrete measures to tackle the world’s worst air pollution.”As pressure mounted on the government, authorities in Delhi ordered a ban on all construction work and barred lorries from entering the city.Around 50,000 mostly diesel-fuelled lorries pass through India’s capital every night and they are a major contributor to the pollution plaguing the city.- Struggling to respond -It is the second year running that Delhi — now the world’s most polluted capital with air quality worse than Beijing — has faced such high levels of PM2.5.Media reports said the thick smog had also led to a series of road accidents in north India.Eight students were killed late Wednesday when a truck ploughed into them as they waited for a bus on a roadside in Punjab.Since 2014, when WHO figures showed the extent of the crisis, authorities in Delhi have closed power plants temporarily and experimented with taking some cars off the road.But the temporary measures have had little effect.Under pressure to respond, Delhi’s Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal on Thursday sought to blame stubble burning by farmers in neighbouring states.”We we will continue facing this every year until the neighbouring state governments resolve the issue of crop burning,” he told reporters in Delhi.The practice of burning crop stubble remains commonplace in north India despite an official ban.Kejriwal said his government would decide in the next day or two whether to reintroduce restrictions on driving cars in the city.last_img read more

Youth Says Involvement in Riots Changed His Life

first_imgFrom handcuffs to hard hats, Jamel Maxwell says that his life changed after being arrested during the uprising. (Courtesy photos)Jamel Maxwell was riding the bus to Mondawmin Metro Station last April, when the bus driver announced she wouldn’t be stopping at the end of the line, letting passengers off five blocks away from the station. Maxwell lived south of North Avenue.He walked to Mondawmin Metro Station to transfer to another bus. All the buses were shut down. He walked toward home and into a swelling crowd of youngsters and police equipped in full riot gear, barricading roads in the area. What he didn’t know was that people had begun to gather in what would become known as the Uprising, a day when the frustration for many in Baltimore boiled over in the aftermath of the death of Freddie Gray in police custody.“I wasn’t even going to get into it. But in my mind I’m thinking this is a trap,” Maxwell told the AFRO, “A police officer tells me to keep moving, but I had nowhere to go. The situation was provoked. I got angry and joined the crowd,” he said. He was then arrested and put in handcuffs.An article published in Mother Jones, corroborates Maxwell’s account of that day. According to eyewitness reports, the article said, the blockades “essentially corralled young people in the area” and that “police actions inflamed a tense-but-stable situation.” The article further states that “it was difficult to leave the neighborhood…the kids were stuck there because of police actions.”Maxwell was angry at police, but more angry about the climate and conditions he had to live in as a citizen of Baltimore. He was upset that drugs and violence rule supreme in his neighborhood and that there is very little opportunity for him to grow and make something of himself in the city he calls home.“I was terrified for him,” said Tamara Fitzpatrick, Maxwell’s former English teacher at Edmondson-Westside High School. Initially, she was angry at him for risking his life. “I was taken aback and horrified, but after I thought about it I realized that he wasn’t thinking about being arrested. To him, he was fighting back for years of feeling belittled by society and for feeling like he was nothing.“I contacted him on social media and explained my anger was more of concern for him, that I  loved him and I just wanted him to be safe.”Maxwell studied carpentry while at Edmondson. He played football and ran track.“He was an incredible singer and he made everybody laugh,” said Nichole Wright, a former teacher at Edmondson Westside.Maxwell spent three days in jail for his participation in the riots. He left Central Booking on crutches, but was not charged with a crime. He was let go from his job at Walmart because of his injuries.Maxwell is not proud of the part he played in the riots but says he would not change anything about that day. “Yes, it was stupid, but it was an eye opener for me to see how crazy this world really is–there is no love in this city. Everything and everybody is disconnected. There is no loyalty or respect in the streets. Too much of my generation is out here thugging and bugging out on these pills, losing there minds, killing each other for nothing.”Maxwell is heading further south to start a job in construction while he pursues a career in entertainment. The city is full of people with no faith, Maxwell says, which is why he won’t be coming back anytime soon.Recently, Maxwell traveled to Atlanta, Ga., to reunite with his father, who left Baltimore when Maxwell was 13. “He seems to be doing well in Georgia. I hope that he builds a comfortable life there and stays,” said Horton. “Visit Baltimore, but do not come back. The city has gone through so much, and I don’t want it to drag him down in the process.”An opportunity to travel allowed him space to regroup. “I realized that I had an opportunity to do something with my life, We all do,” said Maxwell. “It’s hard out here, but Baltimore builds character and strength. There is nothing your faith can’t carry you through. If you can make it here you can make it anywhere.”last_img read more

ATM fraud case Probe reveals cloning of cards used to take place

first_imgKolkata: In a major revelation in connection with the ATM fraud case, the city police has come to know that the cloning of debit cards used to take place in a neighbouring country. The cloning of cards was done using details stolen from debit cards in Kolkata.The police have come to know about the information after the arrest of Adre Liviu and Cornel Constantine from Indore on Thursday.It has come to light that members of the Romanian gang used to install skimming machines in ATM counters in Kolkata. They used to remove the skimming machine after it had read details of some cards swiped at the ATM counter for any transaction. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThey extracted the stored data from the skimming machines and sent the same to their counterparts in theneighbouring country to prepare the clone cards. It took them around two to two and a half months to prepare a clone card.The cards were then sent to members of the Romanian gang in Delhi and using the same, cash was withdrawn from different ATMs in Delhi.Preliminary investigation has revealed that Adre was the main person in charge of installing the skimming machines at ATM counters. Both Adre and Cornel were close associates of another Romanian national Nana, who was arrested from the Indo-Nepal border on Wednesday by Customs. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedHe was later handed over to Kolkata Police. The police had come to know about Adre and Cornel from Nana.The duo had realised that they would also get arrested after Nana was caught. So they were also trying to flee from the country. The car in which they were travelling was fitted with a GPS system and it enabled the police to track them with the help of Indore Police.Preliminary investigation has revealed that Nana and the duo had connection with their counterparts in the neighbouring country. A shop has also been identified in the neighbouring country, where the cloning of cards used to take place. A team comprising members of the Special Investigation Team (SIT) are in constant touch with the security agency in the neighbouring country and may visit the place to further probe the case.The arrested persons have been brought to Kolkata on Friday and they were produced before the Bankshall Court. The police suspect that there could be more people involved in the crime and officers in the SIT are trying to ascertain the same.last_img read more