Half-time: QPR 0 Swansea 1

first_imgRob Green’s mistake eight minutes into his debut gifted Swansea the lead at Loftus Road.The QPR goalkeeper should have gathered Michu’s tame left-footed shot comfortably but instead allowed the ball to squirm through his hands and into the net.Jamie Mackie was then presented with a great chance to equalise after Adel Taarabt’s shot ricocheted into his path.Keeper Michel Vorm was able to parry Mackie’s close-range effort and the loose ball was hacked away from near the line by Chico Flores.Junior Hoilett also missed an opportunity to score, heading wide from a cross by fellow debutant Fabio, before a 25-yarder from Taarabt was well saved by Vorm.Rangers dominated most of the half but were twice rescued by the woodwork shortly before the break.First Ashley Williams headed against the crossbar after Green had been caught out by Jonathan de Guzman’s left-wing corner.Then, after Green again struggled to deal with a high ball, Michu’s volley from the edge of the six-yard box also struck the bar.See also:The QPR v Swansea City quizFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Evangelical Christians Split on How to Handle Evolution

first_imgA dismal picture of controversy dividing Christian brother against brother, with no resolution in sight, is painted by Paul Nussbaum in the Philadelphia Inquirer.  He says evangelical Christians are not monolithic in their opposition to evolution, but as divided as much of the rest of the nation.  He quotes a spokesperson for the American Scientific Affiliation, a group of scientists who lean toward theistic evolution and old-earth creationism, saying:No topic in the world of science and Christianity has created the intensity of discussion and disharmony with evangelicals as the source of biological diversity.  Today’s spirited discussion often pits Christian vs. Christian and scientist vs. scientist.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)The article touches on some of the approaches for integrating Christian faith and evolution, including young-earth creationism, intelligent design, theistic evolution, and the view that science and religion represent non-overlapping realms of truth.    One evangelical certainly not conflicted over evolution is Lee Strobel, former atheist and now host of Faith Under Fire and author of The Case for a Creator.  Interviewed by Christianity Today, Strobel argues that no compromise is necessary; science backs up faith. Nussbaum allowed David Wilcox (Eastern U) to get away with a horrendous straw man argument.  Wilcox puts words into an imaginary student’s mouth when facing evolution in biology class: “Why do I have to learn this stuff – don’t you know that God hates science?”  Good grief.  Has anyone outside an insane asylum ever said that?  In response, Wilcox triumphantly touts theistic evolution as the winner with this half-truth: “God doesn’t hate science – he invented it.  We try to get them to see that evolution happened and it’s not so scary… that evolution is the way God did it.”  Well, if Nussbaum’s intent was to make this proponent of “evolutionary theism” make a fool of himself, he succeeded.  Runner-up was Ken Miller again with this borderline blasphemous straw man: “Their [the creationists’] God is like a kid who is not a very good mechanic and has to keep lifting the hood and tinkering with the engine.”  Who’s he kidding?  It’s the Darwinists who worship Tinker Bell (see 03/11/2005 commentary).   Other than that, Nussbaum’s article is fairly balanced, though gloomy.  He seems to see the most light in the two compromise views that will never work, theistic evolution (an oxymoron) or non-overlapping domains (a false dichotomy).  The main flaw in the article is the covert treatment of evolution as science instead of religion.  That is the hidden assumption in much of secular reporting.  It must be exposed for what it is: a big lie.  Therapy requires mastering the Baloney Detector, then reading all the chain links on Darwinism and Evolutionary Theory in these pages.  Follow-up treatment can include digesting our online book.    The evangelicals who are not gloomy and conflicted are the young-earth creationists and intelligent design people.  Most of them are vibrant, motivated, excited, passionate, interested, and devoted.  Maybe they’re onto something.  Read this, especially the first bullet item.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Scientists Not Prepared for Evil

first_img(Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 What would scientists say if North Korea nuked their labs? Not much.Two articles about rogue nations underscore the importance of morality for science.In Iran, a shady market for papers flourishes (Science Magazine). Readers of scientific papers naively assume that the authors are honest. It presupposes a moral code among scientists: to understand nature, everyone must report findings correctly, striving to maintain the dignity and integrity of science. This story shows that one cannot assume everyone follows that moral standard. A shady business of papers-for-hire is flourishing in Iran. Since the 1979 Iranian revolution, Richard Stone reports, there’s been a 20-fold increase in ghost-written theses and journal papers for hire:It’s unknown how many papers and theses are ginned up under false pretenses. In 2014, a member of Iran’s Academy of Sciences estimated that each year as many as 5000 theses—roughly 10% of all master’s and Ph.D. theses awarded in Iran—are bought from dealers. In a recent Google search, Behzad Ataie-Ashtiani, a civil engineering professor at Sharif University of Technology here who has shined a light on the practice (Science, 18 March, p. 1273), says he found 330,000 links to paper sellers in Farsi. He estimates there are at least a couple of thousand such operations in Iran. Iranian scientists publish about 30,000 papers a year in international journals, a 20-fold increase since the 1979 revolution (Science, 4 September 2015, p. 1029). Purchased publications “damage the reputation of large numbers of Iranian scientists who don’t cheat, and erode the trust of the international scientific community,” possibly endangering collaborations, says Hossein Akhani, a biologist at the University of Tehran.A similar scandal is occurring in China, Stone says. What’s the solution? There ought to be a law! But what if the lawmakers are shady operators, too? Evolutionists will have a particular problem with this situation. They can’t say it’s wrong, because their own theories of cooperation make cheaters part of the equation. According to their “game theory” equations, cheaters and cooperators always emerge in an uneasy mix. It’s all natural selection.North Korea’s nukes are nearly ready for launch. Now what? (New Scientist). Science can describe how atomic bombs and missiles work, but it cannot stop their evil use. New Scientist (emphasis on scientist) is worried that North Korea could nuke America. “Kim Jong-un may soon be able to hit his neighbours, and even the continental US, with Hiroshima-sized nuclear weapons,” Deborah MacKenzie writes. “It’s time to make sure he doesn’t hit the button.” We don’t need more equations, in other words. We need strong deterrence from strong leadership. Scientists can inform policy makers, but cannot explain why evil exists.Like we say: what will scientists say if North Korea nukes their labs? If it’s all evolution, so be it. Stuff happens.last_img read more

European pensioners ‘look to SA’

first_img Steffers said the foreign demand for properties is growing at an exponential rate but is important to note that owners need to price their homes at realistic prices. “The fact that European immigrants are getting around ten Rand for every Euro they bring into the country over and above the fact that properties in South Africa have historically been priced substantially below their European counterparts makes South Africa a very attractive destination.‘The same infrastructure’ “In most cases, we are able to offer much the same infrastructure in terms of shopping and recreational facilities as their home countries. In additional, retirement villages are springing up all over the place for a time when these individuals may need additional care and support,’ he said. Overall prices range from just over R1-million to properties in the R3-million to R4- million range. “We see many much more modest properties – mostly in older suburbs – selling for substantially lower prices.” Apex Property Brokers have not made any attempt to advertise in Europe and all business has been through word of mouth. A positive fact for foreign buyers is that house prices, according to almost all indices, are at best flat with a similar outlook going forward. There has also been solid interest from buyers in other African states who see South Africa as a safe haven with a stable democracy free of wars and revolutions. At the top of the list are buyers from Nigeria and Uganda with solid interest from Francophone countries like the Ivory Coast, Steffers said. There has also been solid interest from foreign buyers in properties like guest houses and rural estates. “We have recently listed two properties along the banks of the Magalies River in Magaliesburg which offer fantastic opportunities for developers looking to establish boutique hotels or guest houses.” Sapa The fact that there are sizeable Greek and Portuguese communities already in the country provides a ready-made support system.  The fact that South Africa is a nation of immigrants means that they are usually welcomed with open arms,” he said. The fact that bonds are fairly easily available if the buyer is able to ante up a sizeable deposit is an additional factor that makes the country an attractive proposition as is the fact that interest rates are at historic lows. One of these areas is the West Rand in Johannesburg, which includes Florida, Roodepoort and even the old mining town of Randfontein. Fred Steffers, managing director of Krugersdorp-based Apex Property Brokers said he had numerous enquiries during November and December from Europeans who were on holiday in South Africa and who were looking to resettle. “Obviously the well-heeled crowd are looking at the western Cape including the Winelands and the Natal south Coast,” he said. “For the hard-pressed Greeks, Spanish and Portuguese nationals, something that offers substantial better value for money and is at the same time affordable, has brought the West Rand into sharp focus. “Offering some of the lowest prices per square metre for upmarket properties anywhere in the world, we have been marketing houses and town-houses in areas like Noordheuwel, Featherbrooke and Chancliff in Krugersdorp while properties in Constantia Kloof, Ruimsig and Helderkruin in Roodepoort have been moving rapidly,” Steffers said.‘A preferred destination’ There are several reasons why South Africa has become a preferred destination for these pensioner immigrants, he said. “First of all the visa requirements are fairly lenient and as long as an pensioner immigrant can prove that they have an adequate visible means of support and that they will not become a burden to the state, visas are usually fairly easily obtainable.” Pensioners, especially those in southern Europe who are seeing their pensions and other benefits erode as a result of austerity measures introduced by the European Union, are looking at some unusual parts of South Africa to resettle. 14 February 2013last_img read more

Degree to grow local govt capacity

first_img30 July 2013Local government is critical to South Africa’s industrialisation, Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies said at the launch of a Bachelor of Economics (Local Economic Development) degree at the University of the Western Cape on Monday.“South Africa needs municipalities that are effective, and developments need to start there,” Davies said in a statement.He said the programme, sponsored by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), would help municipalities to stimulate area-based economic development by identifying economic gaps and working with small businesses to close those gaps.“Ultimately this intervention will assist the DTI to achieve its strategic objective of industrial development, competitiveness and employment creation in all corners of the country, ensuring that key economic policies like the IPAP [Industrial Policy Action Plan] are understood and driven at a local level.”Four-year degree programmeThe four-year degree programme is offered by the University of the Western Cape in collaboration with the University of Johannesburg through their B. Econ (Local Economic Development) degree.The programme commenced in 2012 with 26 registered students, of whom 23 have progressed to their second year, with 30 new students currently doing their first year.“Bursaries will be available for the students enrolling for the degree in 2013,” Sipho Zikode, deputy director-general in the DTI’s broadening participation division, said in a statement on Monday.Zikode added that the DTI was currently negotiating with municipalities to take students for in-service training to complete their qualifications.University of the Western Cape vice-chancellor Brian O’Connel said the university was honoured to partner with the government on the initiative, adding that the only way South Africa could address the inherited challenges of apartheid was by developing the appropriate competencies.Capacity building programmeThe degree programme forms part of a comprehensive capacity building programme designed to build economic and industrial development capacity at local government level.It includes a short learning programme, as well as mentorship and research components targeting people already working in municipalities who are unable to attend the full-time degree course.All universities who are members of the consortium have received appropriate training so that they can offer the programme to municipalities and all other interested individuals in their localities.The short learning programme will be offered to municipalities by the University of the Western Cape, University of KwaZulu-Natal, University of Limpopo, Tshwane University of Technology, Walter Sisulu University, University of Fort Hare and Cape Peninsula University of Technology.The capacity building programme was developed by the DTI in partnership with the South African Local Government Association, the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, and the Industrial Development Corporation.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

South African classrooms go digital

first_img21 July 2015A teaching and learning programme to create paperless classrooms in 375 high schools would start rolling out today, said the Gauteng department of education.The programme is about combining and using a range of technology like interactive boards and mobile devices such as tablets and laptops with internet connectivity, to conduct teaching and learning. There will be unlimited data usage from 5am to 9pm.Empowerment and responsibility“A child of a domestic worker or a child of a gardener or a child of an unemployed parent will have a tablet in their hands,” Gauteng education MEC Panyaza Lesufi told Grade 12 pupils at the Grace Bible Church in Soweto. “Gone are the days where only those that are rich will have a quality education.”The top three students in their schools would also be given a four-year bursary, he said.“We are empowering you that when you finish your education and are given a form in a bank, and they ask you how much you earn, you will cancel that and say I don’t earn a salary, I pay salaries.”He warned that social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and WhatsApp would not be allowed on the devices. Pornography sites would also be blocked. “With every tablet, we will get an activity report which will show us which sites you visited,” he told the pupils.In numbers“The department has also purchased over 17 000 tablets for Grade 12 learners and 1 800 3D LED interactive boards that are currently being installed in matric classrooms at the targeted schools,” said the department.Over 4 000 classrooms were also re-furbished with new ceilings and specialised lights and blinds to cater for the lighting requirements of the interactive boards. The boards are integrated with the tablets to increase interaction between teachers and students during class.Security riskEarlier this year, tablets were recalled from schools. They needed to have additional security measures installed to stop theft of the devices.“The devices have been fitted with trackers to ensure that they are traceable should they get lost,” said the department. All schools were also linked to police stations to ensure rapid response.Lesufi said if a pupil’s device was being stolen, the student should not act like Rambo and fight the criminals. “Your life comes first.” In addition, if a matriculant did not return the device after the exams, the school would withhold the pupil’s results until it was returned.“This tablet belongs to government. not you. But you are allowed to take pictures with your friends and family.”The deadline for the completion of the renovations to the classrooms, mainly in schools in townships and rural areas, is the end of August.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 81 | Hops, Hallmark and a whole lot more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 81st episode of the Ohio Ag Net podcast, sponsored by AgriGold, has chats with Jamie Arthur about the unique challenge of growing hops; Christine McCracken, senior protein analyst with Rabo Agrifinance about the tough time for hog producers due to challenges from African Swine Fever and more; Hannah Thompson-Weeman of the Animal Agriculture Alliance talks Proposition 12 that recently passed in California and what it means for livestock producers.All that and much more as we talk holiday preparation, Christmas tree farms, and flag football teams as well. Tune in!last_img read more

Rajbhar to meet Shah over sub-quota issue

first_imgSuheldev Bhartiya Samaj Party (SBSP) chief Om Prakash Rajbhar, who had warned of parting ways with the National Democratic Alliance over the sub-quota demand, said on Friday the matter would be taken up with BJP president Amit Shah next week. Mr. Rajbhar, the Backward Class Minister in the Bharatiya Janata Party government in Uttar Pradesh, has been vocal about implementing an expert group recommendation on subcategorisation of the 27% Other Backward Class reservation into three categories to benefit the most-backward castes. “A meeting with the BJP president Amit Shah has been fixed for March 4 (Monday) during which all issues, including the implementation of social justice committee recommendations will be taken up,” Mr. Rajbhar told reporters after a programme at Rasra in Ballia district. “The matter over continuation in the alliance with the BJP has not yet been resolved,” the SBSP leader said.Mr. Rajbhar had earlier threatened to part ways with the BJP if recommendations of the social justice committee were not implemented by February 24, but had later decided to defer a decision in view of the meeting with BJP leadership.Office allotment Besides the implementation of the recommendations, the SBSP chief has also been demanding an office for his party in Lucknow.last_img read more

Mertens reaches semifinals on debut at Australian Open

first_img“If you believe in yourself, then anything can happen,” she said. “But of course semis is, ‘Wow.’”She’s the first Belgian since Kim Clijsters in 2012 to reach the semifinals in Australia, and knew she had plenty of support at home.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Kim, thanks for watching, I knew you sent me a message before the match — don’t be too stressy,” said Mertens, who trains at Clijsters’ academy. “I’m trying to be in your footsteps this week.”The No. 37-ranked Mertens successfully defended her Hobart International title — she decided last year to target that title instead of entering Open qualifying — two weeks ago, and has now won five matches at Melbourne Park. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Read Next Harden’s 28 help Rockets rally for 99-90 win over Heat Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC MOST READ Svitolina framed an attempted overhead and hit it over the baseline to give Mertens match point, and the 22-year-old Belgian finished it with a backhand crosscourt winner to advance to her first major semifinal.Mertens was one of the biggest movers on the women’s tour in 2017 as she improved her year-end ranking from 120 to 35 and won her first career title.In the semis, she’ll play either second-seeded Caroline Wozniacki or Carla Suarez Navarro.In other quarterfinals, top-seeded Rafael Nadal was playing No. 6 Marin Cilic and No. 3 Grigor Dimitrov faced Kyle Edmund.In other news, No 32-seeded Mischa Zverev was fined $45,000 for a poor performance in his first-round match against Hyeon Chung, the largest penalty ever assessed to an individual during a major.Zverev was punished under a new rule implemented by the Grand Slam Board in the off-season intended to deter players with pre-existing injuries to start a tournament and retired from their first-round matches.Zverev was trailing Chung 2-6, 1-4 on the first day when he retired. His fine of $45,000 nearly equals his first-round prize money of 60,000 Australian dollars ($47,900).Zverev’s fine was the largest ever assessed to a player for an on-site Grand Slam offense. Other players have been fined larger amounts following a Grand Slam tournament, such as Serena Williams’ $82,500 fine in 2009 for her tirade at a U.S. Open line judge.Italian player Fabio Fognini was fined $96,000 last year after insulting a chair umpire at the U.S. Open, an amount that could be reduced to $48,000 if he doesn’t have any further offences over the next two years.The new rule came in response to a rash of first-round retirements at Wimbledon last year. View comments 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Mertens dominated against Svitolina, who also entered her first quarterfinal in Australia on a nine-match winning roll after winning the Brisbane International two week ago.Svitolina had won their only previous tour-level match, but had no answers on Rod Laver Arena and later said hip trouble had been bothering her all year.“She played great from the beginning of the year,” Svitolina said. “But, you know, when I give her opportunities to play and to play a good level, then of course she’s going to play. She’s going to go for shots.“Now she’s in semifinal. Now she’s not just a player that’s up and down. She’s quite consistent, and we can see this.”Mertens raced out to a 5-2 in the first set before Svitolina got her only service break. The second set was no contest. Mertens won a 27-point rally while holding serve in the fourth game, then hit a backhand winner into the open corner to break Svitolina in the next game for a 5-0 lead.ADVERTISEMENT Belgium’s Elise Mertens celebrates after defeating Ukraine’s Elina Svitolina in their quarterfinal at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)MELBOURNE, Australia — A year after opting out of qualifying for the Australian Open, Elise Mertens has reached the semifinals in her debut at the season-opening Grand Slam.Mertens upset fourth-seeded Elina Svitolina 6-4, 6-0 on Tuesday to extend her winning streak to 10 matches and be the first woman through to the semifinals at Melbourne Park.ADVERTISEMENT NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerslast_img read more

Needs Screw the Man Who Cares Campaigns Provide Revenue Jolt

first_imgIn addition to the subscription campaigns, Need attributes the revenue spike to a pair of sponsored meet-and-greet events with magazine staff and two topical speaking events featuring Need contributors and members of local organizations. Need also is planning Street Music for Street Kids concert later this month and a “Your Powers for Good” events series.“The idea behind the events was to not only promote Need but to accomplish it through furthering our end mission of assisting humanitarian organizations and those in need,”  founder and executive director Kelly Kinnunen said.Need launched the ScrewTheMan, SaveTheWorld intiative—which was inspired by Paste’s Save Paste campaign—in an effort to generate 25,000 new subscribers, which would more than double Need’s current circulation of 19,000. If successful, Need said it would eliminate all commercial advertisingfor one year and replace the allocated advertising pages with storiesof how readers are involved in saving the world.The Who Cares? campaign is intended to drive bulk subscription orders. “The average single order sale is up by $12 from last quarter, so each person is ordering more,” Stephanie Kinnunen said. Despite the revenue boost, though, she said the magazine has secured only “a fraction” of the new subscriptions needed to meet its ambitious goal. Minneapolis, Minnesota-based “humanitarian” magazine Need has seen some positive results from its ScrewTheMan, SaveTheWorld and Who Cares? subscription campaigns. So far—through the June, July and August period—the magazine has seen subscription revenue jump nearly 900 percent from the same period last year.“This has been amazing considering it is summer which is normally bad and we have not had a magazine out since early February,” editor-in-chief Stephanie Kinnunen told FOLIO:. Usually carrying a quarterly frequency, Need hopes to print its next edition by mid- to late-November.last_img read more