Why Brownridge Stepped Aside

first_imgYesterday, Kent Brownridge—the former Wenner Media executive who, along with Quadrangle Partners, formed Alpha Media last year after acquiring Dennis Publishing’s U.S. assets (Maxim, Stuff and Blender, though not The Week) for $240 million—announced he was stepping down as CEO. The company named a pair of co-CEOs to take his place, with Brownridge retaining the title of chairman.This was a curious move, because Brownridge, a notorious workaholic, became known for his hands-on management style at Wenner Media, where he spent 21 years as Jann Wenner’s consigliore. And despite the curious timing—both Blender and Maxim, like most consumer titles, have struggled to sell ads in 2008—it appears that Brownridge’s departure is truly a case of a 68-year-old publishing executive wanting to spend more time away from the office, cut the 100-hour workweeks in half and, perhaps for the first time in his career, take a “summer Friday” or two.“I have a new wife who’s not liking this very much. And while my health is very good, I want it to stay that way,” Brownridge told Portfolio. “I plan to get home at six instead of 10. Also, we have summer Fridays here, so I might even do that.” Brownridge sounded more confident that he would, in fact, take them when he spoke to WWD: “I’m going to take summer Fridays, not go into the office every day, and I’m not going to stay past 5 p.m.” He admitted that his post-Wenner “retirement” didn’t work, which is why he plans to be an “active” chairman while spending less time fielding a “steady flow of e-mails at all hours to [his] BlackBerry.” The sources I spoke with yesterday seemed to buy Brownridge’s version, and refuted the notion that there was pressure from Quadrangle to move Brownridge out, although that’s always a possibility.For now, though, he can rest his BlackBerry thumb, and take that summer Friday.last_img read more

BAC Mono R improves on an alreadywild track toy

first_img Exotic Cars Performance Cars 10:08 More From Roadshow 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet first drive: The uber-roadster 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 0 Share your voice 2020 Lotus Evora GT first drive: A reminder to drive Now playing: Watch this: Enlarge ImageIt doesn’t look like it’s legal to drive on public roads, but that’s half the fun of it. BAC The BAC Mono is part of a weird corner of the automotive industry that makes race cars legal enough to be driven on the road. It’s an absolutely wild car, and now, at the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed, there’s a new one that’s even more bonkers than the car that preceded it.BAC on Thursday unveiled the new Mono R, heralding the second generation of the company’s road-legal track toy. It’s lighter than before, but it’s also more powerful than before, which means its performance should easily trounce its forebear. The whole package weighs just 1,224 pounds in its R form, which is ridiculously light and also some 55 pounds lighter than the standard Mono. All that weight savings comes from a confluence of lightweight parts, including a magnesium chassis, magnesium transmission parts, carbon-ceramic brakes, a titanium exhaust system, lighter AP Racing brakes and a carbon fiber floor. The body panels are also made of carbon fiber. BAC Mono R unveiled at 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed BAC Mono R is somehow more hardcore than before 30 Photos Post a comment Tags Goodwood Festival of Speed 2019 Speaking of the body panels, the new Mono doesn’t look too different compared to its predecessor, sporting the same wildly styled look that’s more at home on a racing circuit than your local village road. But BAC has paid extra attention to the aerodynamics, growing wider side pods while improving the efficiency of its rear wing. LED headlights up front keep things nice and bright, because when you’re going that fast, you need all the help you can get. (Maybe save the high-speed antics for the daytime.)Under the body is a 2.5-liter I4 producing about 340 horsepower, about 35 more than the standard Mono. That extra power comes from a larger cylinder bore, a shorter crankshaft stroke, a new air intake, revised throttle bodies and a tweaked cylinder head. It should be even better to drive, too, thanks to revised suspension geometry that reduces body movements under braking and a gas tank that helps lower the center of gravity closer to the core of the planet.If you’re looking at this and thinking, “Man, I need one,” I hate to say it but you’re out of luck. Only 30 BAC Mono R models will be built, and all of them were offered to existing Mono owners around the world, so they’re now sold out. Better luck next time?last_img read more

Challenging the Racist Legacy of Confederate Monuments

first_imgPablo Machioli’s statue is a protest of Confederate monuments and what they represent. It was confiscated by Baltimore police and Baltimore park rangers. (Photo Credit: Sean Yoes)I spent part of Monday afternoon (Nov. 2) in Druid Hill Park helping load a 500 pound, 12 foot tall statue of a pregnant, bare breasted woman of color into the back of a city-owned pick-up truck. It was no easy task.But, despite her size, the statue was on route this week to its third destination in just a few days and her future still seems dubious.However, what is clear is how she arrived at an out of the way storage facility in Druid Hill Park, less than 24 hours after being erected on Oct. 29, in the Wyman Park Dell in front of the statue of Confederate icons Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson.“It will be destroyed and you will be arrested for disorderly conduct,” was the unequivocal declaration of a Baltimore City police officer around 4 p.m. on Oct. 30, according to community organizer and activist Owen Silverman Andrews.“He said, `Get away from the statue,’ and he grabbed me by the arm and kind of dragged me off to the side and said, `if you step towards it again I’ll arrest you,’” Andrews told the AFRO.The statue was confiscated by Baltimore police and Baltimore City park rangers and transported to Druid Hill Park. Andrews was subsequently given a citation and the statue is currently at the Copycat building, an artist enclave on Guilford Avenue.Andrews is part of a group that placed the statue crafted by artist Pablo Machioli in front of the Lee-Jackson monument, in protest of what it stands for in the minds of many; oppression, racism and White supremacy.“In this case this woman is protesting with the fist up and walking away, giving the back to them (Lee and Jackson),” said Machioli a native of Uruguay. We are being suppressed by violence. So, the best way for me is to show disobedience, but at the same time doing something peaceful and positive and include the community,” he added.After the massacre of the Charleston Nine during a church bible study last summer by a Confederate flag embracing, White supremacist there has been new scrutiny of Civil War symbols across the country including Baltimore.Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake tasked a seven-member commission to analyze four monuments on city property and hold a series of public hearings. In addition to the immediate removal of all Confederate monuments, the group has added new demands this week. They want the commission to widen the scope of the hearings to include the statue of Christopher Columbus in Druid Hill Park. They also want the city to allow artistic responses to these monuments without fear of being fined or otherwise intimidated by Baltimore police or Baltimore City park rangers. The group also demands more funding for artists, particularly artists of color and women artists.The Lee-Jackson monument in particular has sparked the ire of many because it was erected in 1948, almost 100 years after the civil war was fought, more an affirmation of segregation and institutional racism in Baltimore, as opposed to a commemoration of the Civil War.“The monuments are a creation of a period of American history…that’s the nadir of race relations, the sad period from 1890 to 1940,” said James Loewen a sociologist, who recently testified before the city’s Confederate commission.“That’s when the United States, White folks anyway, were most racist in their thinking more than any other time. That’s when they (the statues) are from. We need to understand that about them and they then also tell us complete lies about the Civil War,” Loewen added.What he alludes to is an inscription on the Lee-Jackson statue that says they fought the war in a “gentlemanly” way. But, according to Loewen, when Lee went through Maryland, his army enslaved every Black person they saw, whether they had been legally emancipated or not.Sean Yoes“For a long time the slaves back then, and now…our hands are made of gold,” explained Machioli, in reference to the hands of the statue being painted gold. “It (symbolizes) our hands, workers hands suppressed hands,” he added.“They can take it away, but they can’t destroy it,” Andrews said. “Even if they destroy it physically they can’t destroy what happened….they’re only making it stronger.”Sean Yoes is a senior contributor of the AFRO and executive producer and host of First Edition, which airs Monday through Friday, 5-7 pm on WEAA, 88.9.last_img