Kevin Durant no longer All-Star Game starter, according to vote

first_imgHow badly do Warriors fans want Kevin Durant to re-sign with the team? Well, right about now would be a good time to show him.As of now, the love for Durant is a little lacking in the All-Star Game voting.The Warriors star is no longer one of the Western Conference starters, having been supplanted by Oklahoma City’s Paul George in the latest voting for the All-Star Game, the league announced Thursday.Meanwhile, Stephen Curry has maintained his lead over Western Conference guards for the …last_img read more

Owami celebrates women as active citizens

first_img‘Be Bold For Change’ – The theme for the third inaugural Owami Women Play Your Part Recognition Awards that took place on Thursday 21 September 2017 at La Toscana in Fourways to celebrate women who are socially and economically responsible, influential and engaged at a local community level.Brand South Africa and Owami Women congratulates all the women who were recognised and trusts that they will inspire more South Africans to play their part. (Image: Mathiba Molefe)Phindi MadunaThe third inaugural Owami Women Play Your Part Recognition Awards took place on Thursday 21 September 2017 at La Toscana in Fourways to celebrate women who are socially and economically responsible, influential and engaged at a local community level. This year’s theme was ‘Be Bold For Change’.Women are an important part of South African society who have been contributing to lessening many of South Africa’s social, economic and political challenges for years. The many social, economic and political achievements of South Africa are due to the combined energies of women from different walks of life and they must be shown appreciation. This is the basis for the partnership between Brand South Africa and Owami Women.“The National Development Plan recognises that although progress has been made to improve the lives of women; discrimination, patriarchal beliefs and poor access to quality education and career opportunities persist”, said the deputy minister of communications, Tandi Mahambehlala.The awards focus on recognising and celebrating women who are developing their communities and are playing their part in the areas of education, entrepreneurship, and skills development. Owami Women and Brand South Africa called on the country to nominate women they believed play their part and contribute towards a positive social change in our nation.Deputy minister of communications, Tandi Mahambehlala’s positive keynote address reiterated that “the National Development Plan recognises that although progress has been made to improve the lives of women; discrimination, patriarchal beliefs and poor access to quality education and career opportunities persists”.Women of all ages converged in Monte Casino’s La Toscana in Fourways to celebrate the achievements of South African women and inspire the next generation of young women to take up the challenge and pursue greatness.The deputy minister was followed by the acting chief executive of the SABC, Nomsa Philiso, who was the guest speaker. She shared some motivating anecdotes about the role that bold women have played in her life saying: “What inspires me are women that go for it but do not leave people behind”. She encouraged others to “get people to believe in themselves. It takes nothing away from you”.This year the following women were recognised:Dr Sheena Geness from the Geness Foundation in GautengOfentse Nhlengethwa from Lebone II College in North WestAobakwe Tsheloane from Lebone II College in North WestNangamso Khoza from the Inqubela foundation in the Eastern CapeRahab Matebane from the Mapitsi Foundation in GautengNabilah Plaatjies from I love ZA in GautengPontsho Manzi from Fabulous Woman in GautengShamila Ramjawan from the Princess D CupLetlotlo Morule from Lebone II College in North WestMargaret Ramatsobane from Sizakele Social and Education Programme in GautengLouise van Rhyn from Symphonia in GautengLydia Hlongwane from I Care Organisation in GautengZuraida Jardine who is a philanthropist and presenterFlorah Modiba from the Arebaokeng Hospice in GautengThandekile Nhleko from the Ikhono Foundation in KwaZulu-NatalMotsatsi Mmola who is a Youth Change Agent in LimpopoLebogang Mashigo from the Nubreed Music Institute in MpumalangaRefilwe Sedumedi from the Sedumedi Foundation in Gauteng“If you are a South African and you feel that you want our country to be positive, it is your responsibility,” said Bridget Nkuna (Left), founder and CEO of Owami Women.Brand South Africa and Owami Women congratulates all the recipients who were recognised and trusts that they will inspire more South Africans to play their part.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Ohio Poultry Association highlights award winners and looks at proactive measures for avian influenza

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As always the Ohio Poultry Association Annual Celebration Banquet was an event not to be missed. The 33rd annual banquet featured great food and the chance to recognize award winners.The Ohio Poultry Association’s Golden Feather Award is given to an individual who has distinguished themselves as a champion of poultry, livestock or other agriculture issues. The 2018 Golden FeatherThe 2018 Golden Feather Award from OPA went to Kevin Elder.Award went to Kevin Elder.  As a technician for the Fairfield Soil and Water Conservation District in the late 1970s and early 1980s, Elder helped introduce farmers to no-till practices. He then served as the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Soil and Water Conservation, Engineering Section administrator and as an agricultural pollution abatement specialist and was instrumental in rewriting Ohio’s agricultural pollution abatement law and developing the state’s manure management program. In addition, he worked with local soil and water conservation districts and USDA agencies to design and inspect the construction of natural resource conservation practices.In 2001, Elder joined the Ohio Department of Agriculture and helped to establish what is now the Division of Livestock Environmental Permitting where he recently retired as the chief and executive director. In this capacity, he oversaw environmental compliance of the state’s largest livestock and poultry farms.The Ohio Poultry Association’s Legacy Award recognizes individuals who are committed to advancingThe Ohio Poultry Association’s Legacy Award went to G.A. Wintzer & Son Co. in Wapakoneta.the mission and values of the state’s egg, chicken and turkey farmers and this year went to G.A. Wintzer & Son Co. in Wapakoneta. The sixth-generation family operation has several family members still actively involved in the business that employs approximately 120 local residents and their fleet of 200 trucks and trailers travel over 2 million miles per year. G.A. Wintzer & Sons Co. services a large amount of laying companies and feed mills throughout all of Ohio and much of Indiana. The company picks up thousands of restaurants and a variety of grocery stores, food processors, butcher shops and small food operations throughout a five state region. Additionally, they collect millions of pounds of raw material per week and recycle that material back into usable products.Terry Wehrkamp of Cooper Farms received the OPA Golden Egg Award for his commitment to advancing the mission and valuesTerry Wehrkamp of Cooper Farms received the OPA Golden Egg Award.of the state’s egg, chicken and turkey farmers. In his current role as Cooper Farms’ director of live production, Wehrkamp oversees the feed production and care of the company’s turkeys, chickens and hogs. He has been a leader on a local, statewide and national level serving on numerous boards for industry and community organizations, including the Ohio Poultry Association, Midwest Poultry Consortium, Animal Agriculture Alliance, National Turkey Federation, Paulding County Farm Bureau, and Paulding County Carnegie Library, among others. In addition, he contributed to the National Poultry Improvement Plan as an Ohio Delegate and member of the General Conference Committee, and was also a member of the Ohio Smart Agriculture Steering Committee.In addition, the migratory bird season is starting to wind down in Ohio but it was still an important topic leading up to the Ohio Poultry Association Annual Banquet. Jenna Gregorich is the Bird Health Program Manager for the Ohio Poultry Association, where she works at implementing the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP). She provided an update of the program.“We are a little unique because in other states this is usually housed in the Department of Agriculture, but we work closely with the ODA and the USDA to help plan Ohio’s disease response efforts,” Gregorich said.The NPIP was established in the early 1930s to eliminate Salmonella Pullorum Disease, which was a major problem in poultry production resulting in up to 80% mortality in chicks. The bacterium Salmonella pullorum causes disease in young chicks and poults producing white diarrhea, dehydration and high mortality. Recovered birds become lifelong carriers and produce Salmonella pullorum infected eggs, which causes the disease in chicks.Through intensive blood testing and elimination of infected birds, the disease has been eradicated from commercial poultry flocks since the early 1970s. Pockets of infection, however, may remain in backyard flocks and there is potential for the disease to spread from these local isolated flocks into commercial poultry at large. The Ohio Department of Agriculture and Ohio Poultry Association work cooperatively on requiring a negative Pullorum Typhoid test for birds older than 16 weeks of age prior to being entered in a swap, sale or exhibition. Primarily chickens and turkeys are affected though other species such as guinea fowl, parrots, partridges, peafowl, pheasants, quail and sparrows may also become infected.Since the start of the program in the 1930s, the NPIP has expanded to monitor other diseases — including avian influenza — in poultry flocks nationwide in cooperation with industry, state and federal agencies to improve poultry and poultry products throughout the country. Avian influenza is the focus this time of year in particular.“It is good that it is quiet right now. We are in the planning response efforts and not actively fighting a disease. My main focus is avian influenza. It is going on a little bit in other states but Ohio, knock on wood, has been very fortunate,” Gregorich said. “Our producers practice awesome biosecurity and they have really enhanced what they are doing on the farm level to keep disease out. We haven’t had any avian influenza breaks. We’re working on education, training, biosecurity and letting people know what the disease is for not just poultry producers but also consumers.”For Ohio, the risk for avian influenza is highest during waterfowl migration seasons, particularly in late winter and early spring.“Right now is prime time waterfowl migratory season. The prime seasons are in the fall when the birds are heading south and right now when they head back north. We just had meetings with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and it is just starting to slow down. Hopefully that will soon calm down and summer is our quiet time,” she said. “February and March are really the times of year things will pop up and we have to watch for the signs.”Gregorich and the NPIP have worked extensively with Ohio’s many commercial egg and poultry operations to help with the ramped up biosecurity efforts in recent years, but they also spend time working with Ohio’s smaller flocks.“The commercial producers really know their biosecurity, but there is a different thought process for some of the backyard flocks that we are trying to educate people about,” she said. “We have the NPIP program with 305 participants where we actively go out and test for avian influenza and monitor on an annual basis. We have a new website now for NPIP where you can learn about biosecurity and how to get tested. We answer questions and emails. We do a number of different workshops. Even if you only have five birds, you need to worry about how to keep them healthy and not get problems in your flock.”One of the earliest signs of avian influenza is increased death with up to 100% mortality in many cases. Birds could also show signs of sickness through respiratory symptoms, depression, loss of appetite, drops in egg production, and/or diarrhea.Consistent biosecurity practices are the best way to prevent diseases from entering a flock. The following steps suggested by OPA and NPIP can help keep birds healthy:1. Keep your distance: Isolate your birds from visitors and other birds by setting up a Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer Area.2. Keep it clean: Prevent germs from spreading by cleaning and disinfecting shoes, tools and equipment. Handle and store feed and water in a way to limit exposure of rodents, insects and wild birds.3. Don’t haul disease home: Clean and disinfect vehicles and cages.4. Don’t borrow disease from your neighbor: Avoid sharing tools and equipment with neighbors.5. Know the warning signs of infectious bird diseases: Watch for early signs to prevent the spread of disease.6. Report sick birds or unexpected deaths to OPA (614-882-6111) or the Ohio Department of Agriculture after hours line at (888-456-3405).last_img read more

Students, women join campaign demanding protection of Manipur territory

first_imgMany sections of the people, including students and women, joined the campaign in Manipur demanding the protection of Manipur’s territory, against the backdrop of the understanding the Centre had reached with some Naga bodies, which held peace talks for the last 22 years. Students from most of the districts came out of their classes on Friday, squatted on busy roads and formed human chains, thereby hindering free flow of traffic.They raised slogans that Manipur territory cannot be compromised and diluted. Women activists and student leaders told The Hindu that Manipur is a State with 2,000 years of written history. M. Keinatombi, a woman activist said, “That Manipur had been an independent kingdom is established by the international treaties the State had signed with some foreign countries. Manipur had its Assembly and elected MLAs. King Budhachandra who was a titular head was summoned in Shillong, now capital of Meghalaya, in September 1949 and he signed the merger agreement under duress after keeping him under house arrest”. He had signed the merger agreement on September 21, 1949 though it was officially made public on October 15, 1949 to synchronise with that of Tripura, a princely State in the Northeast which was merged with independent India. However eminent scholars and other intellectuals in a public convention were of the unanimous view that the merger agreement with Manipur is “null and void” since the State Assembly never authorised the titular king to sign the agreement.”Women who take out torchlight procession every day say that they shall not rest till the details of the Naga agreement are put in public domain.After snapping ties on Thursday with the Manipur government, the Coordination Committee on Manipur Integrity (COCOMI), formed by five civil society organisations quarter-backing the agitations, exhorted the people to launch various campaigns near the houses of the 60 MLAs and four MPs who are allegedly shirking their accountability to the people on this burning issue.Sunil Karam, coordinator of the COCOMI says, “Though the Chief Minister N. Biren had assured the leaders of the civil organisations to summon an emergency session of the Manipur Assembly it is now clear that there will be no session to take a resolution on the Naga agreement. On the other hand, Biren says he will be first to resign or to sacrifice his life if Manipur’s interest and territory are compromised. However some leaders point out that it will be immaterial if Biren resigns or takes the extreme step once the Naga agreement is inked.”Earlier another BJP Cabinet Minister. T. Shyamkumar said he will commit suicide if Manipur’s territory is compromised.However, women activists said that no purpose will be served by their “sacrifices” after the inordinate delay. Women vigilantes say that if there is nothing objectionable in the Naga agreement it should have been kept in the public domain. They further say that it is fearsome why the government is transporting security personnel in trucks, special aircrafts and helicopters to Manipur ahead of the public announcement of the details of the Naga agreement.Police said though they are outnumbered by students, women vigilantes and other activists in the day-and-night agitations, the additional forces from Tripura and other States have not been deployed in the trouble-prone areas yet.last_img read more