How the smart stadium will transform the smart city

first_imgWhat’s the difference between a monster truck rally and a Taylor Swift concert?Water. You can’t hold a monster truck rally without thousands of cubic meters of mud, which in turn can mean tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of gallons of water. By the same token, Taylor Swift’s ornate lighting and staging could can cause power consumption to zoom up the charts and unnaturally force a venue into the red zone for peak power charges. (The prevalence of tattoos, however, at both events is probably about even.)The ability to charge accurate “bill backs” to promoters rather than just somewhat arbitrary flat fee are one of the many drivers of the smart stadium, i.e. venues wired with predictive analytics and sensors to fine-tune costs, consumption and even the fan experience. See also: 5 key technologies of a smart cityStadiums can be extremely difficult facilities to manage. Occupancy can zoom from a handful of people to more than 100,000 and back to empty in a few hours. They can snarl traffic, create havoc between regular residents and visitors and consume more power and/or natural gas than any building in the region. No one wants a repeat of the Super Bowl blackout. At the same time they are also monuments to civic pride. IoT can help smooth out those differences and make everyone good neighbors.The Seattle Mariners, for instance, managed to cut water consumption by 10%, or 2 million gallons, over a three year period in part through IoT technology. IoT help the team pinpoint leaks in pipes. (The team also discovered it only costs around $5 in power to open and close its retractable roof.)The San Diego Padres, meanwhile, have installed LED lights, smart sensors and data management systems to better control water and power. A typical game can require 70 megawatt hours of power, 740 therms of natural gas and over 72,000 gallons of water, or about 48 hot tubs. Through IoT, the team expects to cut resources by more than 25% over the next five years. The stadium is a key “citizen” of tomorrow’s citiesBut the benefits go far beyond power. Sound abatement is increasingly one of the biggest problems for venues as stadiums and urbanites continue to flock to the heart of town. IoT gives people an objective way to monitor and better control sound. Better security and safety? IoT in one venue alerted the staff to a small fire caused by a hot dog roller that was accidentally left on after a game. Smart cameras for parking lots and surrounding streets will likely become standard to reduce the crime and vandalism that can sometimes mar public events.Want to find shorter beer lines? Avoid the bathroom with a major flood? Or figure out the best way to get home or to the airport based on anticipated traffic and public transportation options? There will be an app for that. And this is just the beginning. There are an estimated 12,216 stadiums worldwide, according to World Stadiums, and a growing number are located in megacities and emerging markets where water is scarce, power is fragile, and traffic is horrendous. Some stadiums are sparkling new, while others, date back to the 1920s. These venues can become open showcases for what’s possible. Let the games begin. The author is Senior Vice President of Sales, Marketing and Partners at OSIsoft. How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic … Martin Otterson Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Cities Tags:#Internet of Things#IoT#OSISoft#Qualcomm#San Diego Padres#Smart Cities#Taylor Swift center_img How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… Related Posts For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In…last_img read more

BJP to project Cong. as anti-OBC in Gujarat

first_imgThe failure to secure the passage of the OBC Bill in the Rajya Sabha, which would give constitutional status to the National Commission for Backward Classes, due to the Opposition’s success in getting an amendment cleared, will be one of the rallying points for the BJP to attack the Congress in Gujarat as being opposed to the community.Shah’s meetingBJP president Amit Shah will be addressing a big meeting of OBC communities (there are said to be at least 146 castes belonging to the OBC category across Gujarat) in Fagvel on September 18, an amplification of its campaign for the Assembly polls in the State due at the end of the year.The party is expecting a crowd of around 50,000 at the meeting, important in terms of countering any losses the party may face due to the Patidar agitation for reservation.Cow protectionThe Patel or Patidar community had traditionally voted with the BJP, and the agitation, since 2015, has meant that the party is looking to consolidate other sections of voters.Fagvel is also the site of a temple of Bhathiji Maharaj, a folk hero of the Rathore Kshatriya community, who, legend has it, sacrificed his life for cow protection. Significantly, the temple was also the site from where Prime Minister Narendra Modi had flagged off his Gujarat Gaurav Yatra in 2002 as Chief Minister.last_img read more

Manitobas child services watchdog to launch review of Tina Fontaine case

first_imgAPTN National NewsAt the time of her disappearance, Tina Fontaine was a ward of a child and family services agency and now Manitoba’s Children’s Advocate says they’re in the very early stages of an investigation into her case.“We’re still in the process of determining how large the review is going to be,” said spokesperson Ainsley Krone. “Our role is really to look at the quality and the type of service that was provided to the child.”Krone couldn’t discuss specific details or provide a timeline for their investigation but says when the review is completed, her office could provide recommendations to the province and agencies involved.The discovery of 15-year-old First Nation girl’s body in a Winnipeg river has sparked sadness and anger.Winnipeg police still haven’t said how Tina Fontaine died but they are asking the public to contact them with any details that may help the investigation. Her remains were reportedly found in a bag in the Red River.Police said her body was found while searching for another missing man Faron Hall. Police divers located her body then.It’s a case that has shocked even police.“She’s a child. This is a child that’s been murdered. Society would be horrified if we found a litter of kittens or pups in the river in this condition. This is a child,” Winnipeg police Sgt. John O’Donovan told reporters at a press conference. “Society should be horrified.”Fontaine was from the Sagkeeng First Nation, an Ojibway community 121 km north of Winnipeg. Police say she had only been in the city for a month before she disappeared on August 9.“She’s definitely been exploited and taken advantage of,” said O’Donovan.A monument to missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls was only unveiled days ago in Winnipeg. On Facebook, provincial Aboriginal Affairs Minister Eric Robinson expressed his outrage that Fontaine’s body was found not far from that same monument.“Last week we unveiled a monument and plaque to honor missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls,” wrote Robinson. “Little did we know a young girl would be found on the Red River, determined to have been murdered only 7 days later.”Robinson says it’s time the federal government calls a national inquiry.In May, the RCMP released a report that found nearly 1,200 Indigenous women had been murdered or went missing in the past three decades across Canada.news@aptn.calast_img read more

US needs an internet data privacy law GAO tells Congress

first_imgThe federal government’s chief auditor has recommended Congress consider developing legislation to beef up consumers’ internet data privacy protections. much like the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation. The recommendation was included in a 56-page report (PDF) issued Wednesday by the Government Accountability Office, the government agency that provides auditing, evaluation and investigative services for Congress. The report was prepared at the request two years ago by Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. (D-N.J.), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has scheduled a hearing to discuss the subject for Feb. 26.”Since I requested this report, the need for comprehensive data privacy and security legislation at the federal level has only become more apparent,” Pallone said in a statement. “From the Cambridge Analytica scandal to the unauthorized disclosures of real-time location data, consumers’ privacy is being violated online and offline in alarming and dangerous ways.” In making its recommendation, the GAO cited Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, saying the episode was just one of many recent internet privacy incidents in which users’ personal data may have been improperly disclosed. The GAO suggests giving the Federal Trade Commission more authority over internet privacy enforcement but also raised concerns about the commission’s enforcement abilities. Noting that the FTC is already the de facto authority over internet privacy in the US, the GAO found that the FTC filed 101 internet privacy enforcement actions in the past decade. Nearly all of those cases resulted in settlement agreements, and in most cases, no fines were issued because the FTC lacked the authority in those cases. “Recent developments regarding Internet privacy suggest that this is an appropriate time for Congress to consider comprehensive Internet privacy legislation,” the GAO report said. “Although FTC has been addressing Internet privacy through its unfair and deceptive practices authority, among other statutes, and other agencies have been addressing this issue using industry-specific statutes, there is no comprehensive federal privacy statute with specific standards.”The report was issued a day before news emerged that the FTC and Facebook were negotiating a multibillion-dollar fine to settle an investigation into the social network’s privacy practices. The exact amount hasn’t been determined, but it would be the largest fine ever imposed by the agency.The FTC began investigating Facebook last year after it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica, a digital consultancy linked to the Trump presidential campaign, improperly accessed data from as many as 87 million Facebook users. The agency is looking into whether Facebook’s actions violated a 2011 agreement with the government in which it pledged to improve its privacy practices. Facebook has said it didn’t violate the consent decree. Creating a US internet privacy law like the GDPR has won some support from tech leaders. Apple CEO Tim Cook has praised the effective data privacy regulation and said he supports a “comprehensive federal data privacy law” in the US.”It is up to us, including my home country, to follow your lead,” he told the European Parliament in October. 3 Tags Tech Industry Security Comments Share your voice Privacylast_img read more

Conditions for Egypts Morsi could lead to premature death Report

first_imgEgyptian president Mohamed MorsiDeposed Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi is being detained in conditions that fail to meet international standards and could lead to his premature death, according to a report released Wednesday by three British lawmakers.Morsi, who has a history of ill-health including diabetes, liver and kidney disease, is not receiving the adequate medical care required, the members of parliament found.The parliamentarians — who formed an Independent Detention Review Panel — also highlighted that 66-year-old Morsi is kept in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day, with just one hour for him to exercise alone.That could be classified as torture by the UN special rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, the panel noted.”Our conclusions are stark,” said panel chair Crispin Blunt MP, presenting the findings in London. “On his health, the denial of basic medical treatment to which he is entitled could lead to his premature death.”The whole overseeing chain of command up to the current president would have responsibility for this.”The panel requested to visit Morsi in prison to review detention and health conditions, but said it received no response from Egyptian authorities.The report was compiled using “all available testimonies”, including witness statements, reports by NGOs and evidence submitted independently, it added.Abdullah Morsi, Morsi’s son, who told the panel he has been denied access to the deposed president along with other relatives and his legal team, was quoted as saying in the statement that their “fears and concerns have been confirmed by the findings”.He called on the international community to condemn his father’s treatment and “push the Egyptian government to allow his family to visit, and for him to receive medical care”.”We do not want him to die in prison,” he added.Morsi was Egypt’s first democratically elected civilian president following the 2011 overthrow of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak during the Arab Spring uprisings.But his year in power proved deeply divisive and he was ousted by current president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, then the army chief, amid mass protests in 2013.last_img read more