Columnist addresses politics and journalism

first_imgAmerican Studies professor Jack Colwell delivered the fourth and final lecture in the Mendoza College of Business Ethics Week series Thursday, stressing the public’s responsibility to stay informed and invested in politics without falling into the trap of “taking things for granted.” Colwell, who is also a political columnist for The South Bend Tribune, framed his discussion of ethics with the interaction between politicians and journalists, two entities that deeply affect the public experience of government. He said the role of the journalist has shifted to accommodate the partisanship and divisive nature of politics today. “Many viewers seek out the news that they want to believe,” Colwell said. “Objectivity is boring and fact-checking is biased if those facts dispute what you want to believe.” The business of journalism affects the content of the message the public receives, Colwell said, and voters today are very willing to avoid logic and rationality in order to doggedly adhere to their political parties of choice. “Voters want to believe what is claimed by candidates and commentators of their particular side of the political spectrum,” Colwell said. “They think the other side must be lying, must be cheating, must be stealing the election, must be defeated.” Colwell discussed the prevalence of negative political advertisements and their success in altering the public opinion of political figures. The ads’ target populations take the policies of their affiliated parties for granted and assume these loyalties should supersede practicality, he said. The parties’ unwillingness to compromise severely inhibits legislative productivity and polarizes news outlets, Colwell said. “In Congress, it is easy to spout anger at any time, for any purpose, in any way and that is not good for democracy,” he said. “Divisiveness and anger in politics is not totally uncommon … but [compromise] is something I fear we lack today.” Colwell said the increased number of news sources, legitimate or not, creates a disconnect between the reality of politics and public awareness.   “Don’t think that [everyone] is providing unbiased news or objective news,” Colwell said. “I hate the term ‘news media.’ The term has come to encompass everything from The Wall Street Journal to tabloids at the supermarket … to Twitter to some blogger writing in the basement in his underwear. “The term now means anything and everything and thus, it now means nothing.” Colwell said the unbiased presentation of facts and political information is an important part of journalists’ duty, and society needs more qualified reporters to take on this mission. “We need reliable news in our democracy, even if it isn’t coming from newspapers delivered on our porch like it used to be,” Colwell said. “We need real journalists. We need real news. We can’t rely on what is said by that blogger in the basement, nor can we rely on what politicians say in their 30-second spots.” The ethical dilemma of the political media relates to the unbiased presentation of facts, Colwell said. The manipulation of public opinion to win elections is a dangerous, ignoble result of the media culture today. “It’s possible, though I won’t say probable, that the voters will stop taking things for granted,” Colwell said. “And if they do, the political consultants will respond. Their job is to win and the negative attacks have won [in the past], but if that changes, their strategies will change as wlast_img read more

NextGen Know-How: Leadership is a behavior

first_img 22SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » A few weeks ago, I attended an event for professional speakers where a well-known presenter shared ways to create connection with your audience. During his speech, he mentioned the town in upstate New York where he grew up. He grew up only 15 minutes from my hometown, so I was excited to talk with him afterwards. He certainly created a connection with me in that moment. We had something in common.After the session concluded, I walked up to him to say how great his speech was and started to tell him where I was from, when…he totally blew me off. He was so busy getting his marketing materials together that he didn’t even make eye contact with me. I was disappointed. Not because I had a need to connect with him on a personal level, but because he wasn’t practicing what he had just taught in his speech. The content of his speech was excellent, but the feeling I got from him afterward totally turned me off.In the speaking industry, there’s an unwritten rule that your speech is not really over when you leave the stage. You may have finished the content, but it’s important to stay connected to your audience until you leave the building. Until then, you are still “on” and your audience is still judging you based on your interactions.The same is true for leadership. As a leader, people observe your actions, even in the small moments that may not seem to matter. Leadership is a behavior, not a role. Everything you do has impact. Even when you are working late and only one person is in the office with you, or when you’re at the company barbecue, or when you’re at a conference out of town, you have an impact.last_img read more

Bethard exits UK online gambling scene

first_img TVBET passes GLI test for five live games in Malta and Italy August 25, 2020 Share Submit StumbleUpon Related Articles Bethard Group has confirmed that it will terminate its entire UK online gambling market presence next month.  The Malta-based gambling operator communicated to UK customers that its flagship Bethard brand would no longer accept wagers or further transactions from the 6 July. UK customers have been given until the 10 August to withdraw funds and clear their player accounts, as Bethard closes its UK presence in line with UKGC licensing procedures.Bethard confirmed to SBC that its UK exit follows a strategic review undertaken during lockdown in which management have chosen to focus on ‘profitable markets’.The operator secured its UKGC licence in 2018 as part of the firm’s multi-market expansion targeting growth in the UK, Denmark and Ireland, having established its presence as a challenger sportsbook in its home market of Sweden.In the exit statement, Bethard management has chosen not to disclose any specific reasons for its decision to depart the UK online gambling scene, simply underling that it has reviewed all marketplace options.UK online gambling tax, regulatory and compliance changes undertaken during the course of 2019-to-2020 have seen a number of licensed incumbents depart the market, including 188BET, Betclic Everest, ComeOn and Royal Panda.Bethard management confirmed that the operator will maintain its presence across all other established markets, through licenses for Malta, Denmark, Ireland, Spain and Sweden. UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020 Winning Post: Swedish regulator pushes back on ‘Storebror’ approach to deposit limits August 24, 2020 Sharelast_img read more