How President-Elect Biden Has Managed Trump’s Refusal to Concede

first_imgStill, she acknowledged: “I know he wants to get started on the transition. He would like some support from the administration to do that. But he’s going forward based on his own resources.”- Advertisement – “Biden’s path to victory in his administration is going to be by putting forward bold plans to address Covid, the economy, climate change and racial injustice,” said Garrett Blad, a spokesman for the Sunrise Movement, a youth-driven progressive organization that is focused on climate and has sought to shape Mr. Biden’s appointments. “Working with the G.O.P. elite who right now are trying to undermine our democracy we do not believe is a strong way forward.”Mr. Biden’s advisers and allies have also acknowledged that they are in fact troubled by the possible ramifications from the Trump administration’s refusal to give Mr. Biden and his transition team access to federal agencies as well as intelligence briefings.The head of the General Services Administration has not formally recognized Mr. Biden as the winner of the election, a step that allows the transfer of power between administrations to proceed.As more time passes, that refusal becomes more problematic, Biden aides say. But even so, they are showing little eagerness to raise the temperature or to wage a legal battle.“We’re not interested in having a food fight with the G.S.A. administrator or anyone, really,” Jen Psaki, a Biden transition adviser, said on Friday. “We just want to get access to intelligence information, to threat assessments, to the ongoing work on Covid, so that we can prepare to govern.”In the meantime, Mr. Biden was taking a break — or something resembling a break. He traveled on Thursday to his vacation house in Rehoboth Beach, Del. “He’s earned, certainly, a couple days off,” Ms. Psaki said.Thomas Kaplan reported from Washington, and Katie Glueck from New York. Those steps, to prepare to govern and to combat the pandemic that has upended American society, followed convention and unfolded without drama. Mr. Biden has decades of experience in Washington to draw on, and his initial moves after winning the presidency demonstrated a familiarity with how one administration typically passes the torch to the next. “It’s a reflection of the president-elect’s desire to project stability at a time of great instability,” said former Gov. Tom Vilsack of Iowa, an early Biden supporter.What was not typical — far from it — was the reaction of Mr. Trump, who continued to refuse to concede, and to make false claims about election fraud. But Mr. Biden pressed on and passed up the chance for aggressive confrontation, treating the president of the United States as if he were a heckler shouting from the bleachers who would eventually tire and go home.This week, Bob Bauer, a Biden campaign adviser and former White House counsel, described Mr. Trump’s election-related legal challenges as “noise,” while Mr. Biden’s sister and close political adviser, Valerie Biden Owens, downplayed the significance of any postelection commentary offered by the president.“It doesn’t matter what Donald Trump says,” she said on “Axios on HBO.” “It doesn’t matter. Joe is president-elect. He will be sworn in on Jan. 20.” Mr. Biden himself suggested Mr. Trump’s refusal to concede was more of a stain on the president’s name for the history books than an imminent obstacle for the Biden transition, telling reporters on Tuesday: “How can I say this tactfully? I think it will not help the president’s legacy.”Asked how he expected to work with Republicans if they would not even acknowledge him as president-elect, Mr. Biden responded with a smile: “They will. They will.”Not everyone is so confident that Republicans will engage — or that Mr. Biden should even prioritize trying to work with them. The Presidential TransitionUpdated Nov. 13, 2020, 4:04 p.m. ETcenter_img WASHINGTON — Joseph R. Biden Jr. ran for president insisting that President Trump was an “aberration” who did not reflect the character or views of the American people.And in his first week as president-elect, Mr. Biden’s remarks and activities suggest an effort to dismiss Mr. Trump further: this time, as a nuisance.- Advertisement – Mr. Biden, who spent much of the week working from the Wilmington, Del., area, held calls with Pope Francis and the leaders of many of the nation’s closest allies, taking initial steps toward his goal of repairing the country’s standing on the world stage following a campaign in which he emphasized his relationships with world leaders.After spending months stressing the need to follow science, he named a group of experts to advise him on the coronavirus pandemic, and on Friday he issued a statement calling for “urgent action” as virus cases continue to surge.And he named Ron Klain, a veteran Washington figure who served as the Ebola czar in the Obama White House, as his chief of staff, a pick that was well received across the ideological spectrum within the Democratic Party.- Advertisement – As he refuses to concede, Mr. Trump has stoked fear and anxiety among many Americans, and he has plainly slowed critical transition processes, to the concern of the Biden team. Yet publicly, Mr. Biden and his aides are seeking to project steadiness. They have ignored Mr. Trump’s tweets, they are building out a White House staff and they are working to model how a shift away from four years of presidential tumult can be done — and how Mr. Biden is likely to behave once he is in the White House.“He is not going to get his knickers in a twist around Donald Trump’s bad manners,” said former Senator Carol Moseley Braun, Democrat of Illinois, who served in the Senate with Mr. Biden. “He knows that he’s going to be president on the 20th of January.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

Students skate, bike, walk to school

first_imgPhoto Gallery: Walk to school day LA MIRADA – Brett Pierce and Fernando Velasco were a little sore and tired before they even started their day at La Mirada High School on Friday. Pierce, 15, and Velasco, 14, rode their foot-powered scooters from their Norwalk homes 3 miles to school as part of “Skate, Bike, Walk to School Day,” a local effort to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. “It was pretty tiring,” said Pierce. “My legs hurt and my calves are tired. It’s pretty far.” “We’re on our way,” Williamson said. “It’s still a new program in its infancy. We’ll work harder next year.”165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! But it was worth it, he said. “I wanted not to make smog and help out our environment,” he added. The two youngsters were among 65 students who took part in the event, organized by foreign language teacher Norma Williamson and other teachers. “We’re trying to educate them about alternatives to fossil fuels and about climate change,” Willliamson said. This was the second year of the event. While organizers had expected 200 students to take part, resulting in a redcution of 1,000 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, participation was up from last year.last_img read more

Mayweather takes on ‘Ninja Boy’ kickboxer in Japan rumble

first_img0Shares0000Floyd Mayweather (left) and kickboxer Nasukawa (right) are undefeated © AFP / Behrouz MEHRITOKYO, Japan, Dec 31 – US boxing superstar Floyd “Money” Mayweather fights undefeated Japanese kickboxing prodigy Tenshin Nasukawa on Monday, a New Year’s Eve multi-million-dollar rumble outside Tokyo to be held under boxing rules.At 41, Mayweather is more than twice the age of his Japanese opponent, the 20-year-old known as “Ninja Boy” but will carry a more than 4kg (9lb) weight advantage into the ring. The bout in Saitama, north of Tokyo, will be fought over three rounds of three minutes but there are no judges and no winner will be declared unless there is a knockout.The bout will also not count on the record of either fighter — allowing both men to retain their cherished unbeaten records — and is being promoted as a pure exhibition match.It will also be boxing only — putting Nasukawa at a disadvantage, with the kickboxer reportedly liable to a $5 million fine if he aims a kick at Mayweather.The purse has not been officially disclosed but media reports have claimed that Mayweather is making $88 million for the nine minutes of action.At a pre-fight news conference, a relaxed-looking Mayweather said he could complete three rounds “in his sleep”.“It is all about entertainment. I don’t worry about anything,” said Mayweather, a legend in the boxing world who has a perfect 50 in and zero defeats record with 27 knockouts.The relaxed American said he would not be concerned even if he were to be floored by his Japanese opponent.“Me getting knocked out or me getting knocked down … I don’t worry about it at all. If that does happen, I mean that’s entertainment. That’s all we need to see,” said Mayweather.– ‘Gym rat’ –Kickboxer Tenshin Nasukawa was little-known outside Japan before the Mayweather clash was announced © AFP/File / Toshifumi KITAMURAVirtually unknown outside the kickboxing ring in his own country, the bleach-blond Nasukawa from Chiba near Tokyo also boasts an unbeaten record.He won the world junior karate championship, made his professional kickboxing debut at the age of 16 and has a 28-0 record with 21 wins by knockout.Promoters RIZIN have hailed him as “perhaps the best combat sports prospect the country has ever seen” and the 20-year-old himself has claimed he has a “punch that boxers don’t have.”“I want to be the man who changes history. I’ll do that with these fists, with one punch — just watch,” Nasukawa said.Even Mayweather appears impressed, describing his opponent as “an unbelievable talent” and praising his lithe, “gym rat” physique.“He is very young. He is very active… very tough. I had a chance to see some highlights (of his performance) and I was impressed with Tenshin. I was very impressed with him.”Nasukawa has dismissed the idea that the boxing rules will count against him, saying: “All I have to do is to give 100 percent … Since Mayweather is expected to dodge my offence, I really want to hit him.”Nothing to lose: Even if knocked out, the three-round exhibition will not count against Floyd Mayweather’s perfect 50-0 record © AFP/File / Toshifumi KITAMURAThis is the second time Mayweather has been coaxed out of retirement. Last year, he knocked out mixed martial arts fighter Conor McGregor in the 10th round of a super-hyped boxing match.There are also unconfirmed rumours Mayweather could take on reigning UFC lightweight champion Khabib Nurmagomedov, who said last month any match-up would be “twice as interesting” as the McGregor fight.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more