Tough MoBay United test for UWI FC

first_imgFirst-time Red Stripe Premier League campaigners UWI FC will continue their march towards a top four position and a place in the semi-final round when they host last year’s beaten finalists and current leaders, Montego Bay United, in one of four matches today.Last week, the university boys improved their chances with a handsome 5-1 win over Boys’ Town, but will find Montego Bay United – a team which has been in the final for the past two years – tough nuts to crack. Not only are the opponents historically strong, but are in good form with Owayne Gordon and Allan Ottey handling the goalscoring responsibility since the departure of Dino Williams.Ronaldo Rodney has also been in good form as has been Jermaine Woozencroft. The issue with Woozencroft is that the opposition has been using rough play to stop him and he has been biting the bait.UWI’S MAIN MANGirvon Brown has been the main man on the offensive front for UWI FC, with good support from Anthony Greenland and Anthony Grant, and goalkeeper Amal Knight leading the defensive line. Montego Bay United are nothing like Boys’ Town and will be a much tougher unit to break down.In addition to the win that UWI FC will need, they will also need Humble Lion FC, the team currently occupying the fourth spot, to lose. The form book would suggest that a loss for Humble Lion is wishful thinking as their opponents, Reno FC, are well below their best and will be expected to drop points even though they are playing at home.At Stadium East, seventh-placed Cavalier FC will be hoping to capitalise on a slip-up by UWI FC and close the gap on them with a positive result over the slumping Boys’ Town.Tivoli Gardens still cannot consider themselves safe from the drop despite being six points clear of the battling Rivoli FC, who play away to Harbour View on Monday. With that being the situation, a positive result for Tivoli Gardens would be a fantastic result for Glendon ‘Admiral’ Bailey and his charges. Their opponents, Portmore United, are not in danger of falling out of the top four, but would be eager to regain the form which saw them top the table. Anything but the best from Portmore United could see them falter in the semi-final round and make the job easier for their opponents.Today’s Games• 5 p.m.: Cavalier vs Boys’ Town – Stadium East• 3 p.m.: FC Reno vs Humble Lion – Frome Complex• 3 p.m.: Tivoli Gardens FC vs Portmore United FC – Edward Seaga Complex• 3 p.m.: UWI FC vs Montego Bay United – UWI Bowl, MonaTomorrow’s game• 8:40 p.m.: Harbour View FC vs Rivoli United FC Harbour View StadiumPOINTS STANDING P W D L GF GA GD PtsMoBay United 27 15 9 3 45 15 30 54Arnett 26 15 5 6 42 20 22 50Portmore 26 14 5 7 31 24 7 47Humble Lion FC 26 10 9 7 24 22 2 39UWI FC 26 10 7 9 30 35 -5 37H. View 26 8 10 8 30 26 4 34Cavalier SC 26 8 7 11 21 25 -4 31Reno 26 7 9 10 25 38 -13 30Boys’ Town 26 8 6 12 29 43 -14 30Tivoli 27 8 5 14 30 37 -7 29Rivoli 26 5 8 12 25 34 -9 23Waterhouse 26 4 10 12 22 32 -10 22last_img read more

Week 8 football preview: Corning heads to Cottonwood; Mercy at Princeton

first_imgCottonwood >> Firmly entrenched in the battle for the Northern Athletic League title, the Corning High football team heads to Cottonwood Friday to battle West Valley, one of two undefeated teams in the NAL standings. The Cards have not won in Cottonwood since at least 2002, meeting nearly every year either in league or nonleague play. “This is going to be our year, we’re hoping,” Corning senior running back Curtis McCoy said last week after a 34-28 win over Red Bluff, which joins Los Molinos …last_img read more

How Khalil Mack, Aaron Donald deals could impact free agency

first_imgAaron Donald and … The new league year begins March 13 with the start of free agency, but the 2019 season unofficially started this week with the NFL Scouting Combine.Beat writers Matt Schneidman (Raiders) and Cam Inman (49ers) have got you covered in Indianapolis for their respective teams. Here are some other issues to be sorted out in a league-wide sense between now and free agency, the draft, minicamps, training camps and finally the playing of games.The Donald/Mack effectlast_img

Lucy Gets a Date with Big Man

first_imgAnother specimen of Australopithecus afarensis has been announced from Ethiopia.  This one supposedly preceded Lucy by 400,000 years, and according to its discoverers, belonged to a group of primates that shows they “were almost as proficient as we are walking on two legs, and that the elongation of our legs came earlier in our evolution than previously thought.”  The discovery by Yohannes Haile-Selassie’s team, was published in PNAS.1  It was immediately announced in the press by National Geographic, Science Daily and PhysOrg.    True to tradition, the discoverers had to give the specimen a catchy name for the press.  In the local Afar tribal language, it’s Kadanuumuu, but in English, it’s Big Man.  That’s because the male had substantially larger stature than Lucy – 5 feet instead of her 3 feet.  The researchers claim this specimen is 3.6 million years old (compared to Lucy’s 3.2 million).  Ardipithecus ramidus (Ardi), found in the same general area, is said to be 4.4 million years old.    The main claims about Big Man is that it shows upright posture more than Ardi, based on pelvic positions and limb proportions.  Only a scapula, a few ribs, parts of the neck and one shoulder, parts of the pelvis, one arm and one leg were found – no skull fragments.    Only National Geographic offered a dissenting opinion.  Its writeup included the observations of Zeresenay Alemseged, an anthropologist at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco.  He doubts that it belongs to A. afarensis, and says that without skull fragments and teeth, it is hard to make a positive identification.  He also thinks Lucy and another baby specimen claimed to be 3.3 million years old show evidence of living in the trees.    In the paper, the team admitted that fitting the new find into an evolutionary sequence requires a bit of punctuated equilibrium.  Here’s what the last paragraph said:The total biomechanical pattern of Au. afarensis involves a host of specialized postcranial characters, all of which are fully consistent with data reported here for KSD-VP-1/1,2 those previously available for Au. afarensis, and the Laetoli footprints (58, 60), which at 3.66 Ma are just slightly older than KSD-VP-1/1 (61).  Equally important are similarities between the Au. afarensis pelvis and the recently described H. erectus specimen from Busidima (BSN49/P27a�d) (11).  These similarities are particularly striking, especially in light of the time separating them (at least 2.2 million years).  Such constancy of morphotype suggests that highly derived terrestrial bipedality enjoyed a long period of stasis punctuated only occasionally by additional modifications to the postcranium of apparently decreasing selective significance (e.g., length of pedal intermediate phalanges, lower limb length).It should be noted that the Laetoli footprints, dated earlier than this specimen, are identical to modern human footprints (03/22/2010).  Haile-Selassie seems to be claiming that bipedality evolved in a few hundred thousand years, then remained essentially unchanged except for minor details for almost four million years.1.  Haile-Selassie et al, “An early Australopithecus afarensis postcranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Published online before print June 21, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1004527107.2.  This is the designation for the new fossil.This is the lightning flash before the thunder.  The news media all light up on cue, but then the long peals of thunder hit when the other teams get angry at the Ethiopian team for trying to put the spotlight on their Big Boy, making him the new star on the Human Evolution Walk of Shame (06/10/2010).  Just you wait.  This is not the History Channel, you know; it’s the Follywood Squares.(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Successful Transplant Games for Durban

first_img6 August 2013The World Transplant Games, which wrapped up in Durban on Saturday with a moving closing ceremony, have been deemed a resounding success by athletes and organisers.Over 1 800 participants from 50 countries enjoyed Durban’s sunshine in winter weather conditions that were warmer than the last Summer Games held in Sweden in 2011.The Durban Games marked the first time that they had been held on African soil and the delegates were overwhelmed by the opening ceremony, featuring Zulu culture and a mass choir of 1 300 members of the public, singing the official World Transplant Games song.Organ donor awarenessThe Games serve as the biggest organ donor awareness event in the world. The aim of the Games is to offer hope to those awaiting transplants and encourage the public to become donors by showing the difference that organ transplants can make to the lives of young and old people alike.In addition to competing in qualifying events, competitors had to be transplant recipients of either solid organs or bone marrow.South African athletes made their mark in Durban.One of the hosts’ standout performers was Helletje Uys, the National Secretary for the South African Transplant Sports Association and the Secretary for the World Transplant Games Local Organising Committee.She won gold in golf and was nominated the best women’s golfer of the Games.In addition, Uys, who has undergone a kidney transplant, added a gold medal in the shot put and broke Transplant Games’ records for the javelin, discus and shot put.‘Fighting for your life’Swedish athlete Martha Ehlin encapsulated the agony that most of the athletes have experienced when she said: “When you are on the list, waiting for a donor, you are not waiting, you are fighting for your life and we are now celebrating our lives at this event in Durban.”Ehlin, who had five transplants during a 17-hour operation, won five gold medals in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 2011 and won gold for shot put, javelin and cricket ball in South Africa, as well as a silver medal in high jump.She competed in four sports at athletics and volleyball, one dedicated to each of her five organ transplants.Howard Dell, running for United States, set a record he desperately wanted on the last day of competition.Competing against record holder Andre Lassooij of the Netherlands, he broke the 200m World Transplant Games record, clocking 25.96 seconds to better the previous mark of 26.79. Dell also won the 100 metres in record time.Montague Summers of Australia broke two world Transplants Games records for the 800 and 1500 metres and equalled the 400 metre World Transplant Games record. He also raised Aus $16 000 (approx R160 000) for an organ donor project to inspire transplantees to integrate in society and sport.The next World Transplant Games will be held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, in 2015.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Heckler at NDP Jagmeet Singh event an example of racism in Canada

first_imgA political science professor says a racist heckler that interrupted a campaign rally for NDP leadership hopeful Jagmeet Singh is an example of the discrimination that deters minorities from politics.A video posted on YouTube of Singh’s campaign event in Brampton, Ont., earlier this week shows a woman interrupting his speech and accusing him of supporting Shariah law and the Muslim Brotherhood.Singh, who is Sikh, responds to the woman saying he supports and loves her, and that he won’t be intimidated by hate.“Everyone in this room loves you, we all support you, we believe in your rights,” he said as she continued yelling at him in front of a crowd of supporters.Erin Tolley, an associate professor at the University of Toronto, said the incident is a reminder that although Canada promotes multiculturalism, racist views are still prevalent.“I think one danger in Canada is we become very congratulatory about our multiculturalism … but to some extent that conceals the number of Canadians that harbour racist sentiments,” she said.Tolley said studies have shown about 30 per cent of Canadians hold racist opinions and while they may not all be vocal about their views, it does influence how they vote.In her research on race and politics, she said discrimination against minorities, gender and people’s sexual orientation can give them pause about whether they want to enter or continue in politics.“I’m working on a study right now talking to people who had ran for the nomination of their party and many candidates of colour were somewhat surprised by what a negative experience it was, and so they are thinking twice about whether they want to continue,” she said.Singh’s ability to keep calm and respond in a positive manner to the heckler is evidence that it wasn’t the first time he experienced outwardly racist remarks, Tolley said.Although it was a negative incident, she said it did allow Singh to show off his leadership skills and raise his profile across the country.“He shows he’s not an angry person, he can keep his wits about him, he isn’t going to lose his cool and, politically, regardless of the situation, that’s seen as advantageous.”Singh’s rising popularity, at least among the NDP, is a sign of a growing desire among the public for more diversity in politics, Tolley said.She added that he’s also viewed as an inspiration to many people, which is reflected in the success he had in getting more people to join the party.Tolley noted that if Singh is voted NDP leader this October, he will be the first federal leader of colour selected by party members in Canada.“Talk about it’s 2017 – given Canada’s history of multiculturalism, how come that hasn’t happened before now?” she said.last_img read more

Manitobas child services watchdog to launch review of Tina Fontaine case

first_imgAPTN National NewsAt the time of her disappearance, Tina Fontaine was a ward of a child and family services agency and now Manitoba’s Children’s Advocate says they’re in the very early stages of an investigation into her case.“We’re still in the process of determining how large the review is going to be,” said spokesperson Ainsley Krone. “Our role is really to look at the quality and the type of service that was provided to the child.”Krone couldn’t discuss specific details or provide a timeline for their investigation but says when the review is completed, her office could provide recommendations to the province and agencies involved.The discovery of 15-year-old First Nation girl’s body in a Winnipeg river has sparked sadness and anger.Winnipeg police still haven’t said how Tina Fontaine died but they are asking the public to contact them with any details that may help the investigation. Her remains were reportedly found in a bag in the Red River.Police said her body was found while searching for another missing man Faron Hall. Police divers located her body then.It’s a case that has shocked even police.“She’s a child. This is a child that’s been murdered. Society would be horrified if we found a litter of kittens or pups in the river in this condition. This is a child,” Winnipeg police Sgt. John O’Donovan told reporters at a press conference. “Society should be horrified.”Fontaine was from the Sagkeeng First Nation, an Ojibway community 121 km north of Winnipeg. Police say she had only been in the city for a month before she disappeared on August 9.“She’s definitely been exploited and taken advantage of,” said O’Donovan.A monument to missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls was only unveiled days ago in Winnipeg. On Facebook, provincial Aboriginal Affairs Minister Eric Robinson expressed his outrage that Fontaine’s body was found not far from that same monument.“Last week we unveiled a monument and plaque to honor missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls,” wrote Robinson. “Little did we know a young girl would be found on the Red River, determined to have been murdered only 7 days later.”Robinson says it’s time the federal government calls a national inquiry.In May, the RCMP released a report that found nearly 1,200 Indigenous women had been murdered or went missing in the past three decades across Canada.news@aptn.calast_img read more

More resignations – including losing top lawyer – hit MMIWG inquiry

first_imgKathleen MartensAPTN NewsThe National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls is dealing with more resignations.APTN News has learned two key members of the inquiry’s communications team are the latest to depart, meaning nearly 30 staffers have left the federally-funded probe.Shaylen Smith and Nadine Gros-Louis are the latest to go, confirmed Catherine Kloczkowski, special advisor – project management.Gros-Louis took a provincial job with the Quebec government, Kloczkowski said in an email.And Smith is pursuing “new opportunities.”The inquiry is looking to fill two positions until it hands in its final report in spring 2019 on the root causes of violence against Indigenous women and girls.“As you can appreciate,” Kloczkowski added, “with the announcement in June of a six month extension instead of the anticipated two year extension requested, staff are understandably beginning to think about their next steps and career opportunities beyond the National Inquiry.”Smith and Gros-Louis aren’t household names but were go-to personnel for media outlets seeking information and arranging interviews with inquiry commissioners and employees.Jennifer Cox, the commission’s co-lead legal counsel, is also gone, APTN has learned.She followed Breen Ouellette  out the door to become the seventh lawyer to exit the inquiry.Cox was named Project Lead of the Enhanced Child Family Initiative at the Mi’kmaq Rights Initiative in October that will see the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia assume control over child welfare matters.Some former staff members have spoken out in the past – saying the inquiry is hobbled by poor management and infighting.But Chief Commissioner Marion Buller has declined to comment publicly on the turnover, citing privacy around personnel issues.And the lawyers sign contracts that forbid them from sharing any inquiry information.They swear in witnesses and handle sensitive testimony that will form the final report.The inquiry has two final hearings remaining – Nov. 26-30 in Calgary and Dec. 10-14 in Ottawa.The two-year inquiry was established by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in September 2016.His government rejected a request to double the time period – and $50 million in funding – of its mandate.kmartens@aptn.ca@katmartelast_img read more