Transfer gossip: Telegraph say Chelsea are set to sign Giroud for £18m

first_imgSome of the recent transfer speculation involving Chelsea…Embed from Getty ImagesChelsea have agreed a fee with Arsenal for Olivier Giroud, according to The Telegraph.The Telegraph say the Blues are poised to sign Giroud for £18m and that this will pave the way for Arsenal to complete the signing of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang from Borussia Dortmund, with Chelsea’s Michy Batshuayi joining the German club on loan as Aubameyang’s replacement.Earlier, The Sun claimed Chelsea will move for Tottenham’s Fernando Llorente if they cannot land Giroud.And the Daily Star claimed Chelsea are ready to let David Luiz join Arsenal in exchange as part of a deal involving Giroud.Speculation over Hazard and CourtoisEmbed from Getty ImagesThe Telegraph say Chelsea will refuse any bid from Manchester City for Eden Hazard – even an offer of £200m.The Mirror have claimed City are looking to buy the Belgian for £150m this summer and that he is boss Pep Guardiola’s number one target.There also continues to be speculation over the future of Chelsea goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois.It comes after Real Madrid, who have long been linked with the Belgian, apparently missed out on the signing of Athletic Bilbao keeper Kepa Arrizabalaga.Real were apparently keen to sign Arrizabalaga, who has signed a new contract.A number of newspapers, including the Telegraph, suggest this could put Courtois’ future in doubt.It is claimed that Real do not want him to sign a new contract at Stamford Bridge and could make a move to sign him.Rochdale youngster linkedChelsea are interested in Rochdale teenager Daniel Adshead, it is claimed.ESPN say it has been told by “sources close to the League One club” that the Dale prospect, 16, is being monitored by the Blues and Arsenal.Midfielder Adshead broke into the first team this season and has been touted as one of the Football League’s brightest young players.Sun say Sunderland boss wants AmpaduEmbed from Getty ImagesSunderland boss Chris Coleman reportedly wants to sign Ethan Ampadu on loan from Chelsea.Wales international Ampadu, 17, has impressed for Chelsea’s first team when selected this season and The Sun say Coleman is looking to take him to the Stadium of Light. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

World War III Is Already Here – And We’re Losing

first_imgEvery day the Pentagon is attacked 3 million times. They’ve infiltrated our banks. They’ve ransacked our technology industry. They’ve breached the networks of the Chamber of Commerce. They’ve read our email by taking down one of America’s pre-eminent technology companies, Google. It’s already World War III, people. And all we do is smile at the enemy.Last Wednesday, The New York Timesannounced that its computers had been hacked. That passwords had been stolen. That its private networks had been traversed with impunity by a bunch of brazen hackers. We’re not talking Anonymous here nor a bunch of ethical hackers. No we’re at war with China.To paraphrase an old newspaper joke, “what’s black and white and red all over?” The Chinese Red Army, that’s who.How do we know that? As William Gibson might bark, “Pattern Recognition!” Computer security experts consulting with The New York Times identified the malware “as a specific strain associated with computer attacks originating in China.”There other telltale signs. Like the fact the hackers broke into The Times’ computers starting on Sept. 13, as the newspaper was putting its final touches on a report that the relatives of China’s Prime Minister Wen Jiabao had accumulated a fortune worth several billion dollars through business dealings.The Definition Of WarIn May 2011, the Pentagon promised it would announce a formal strategy to deter cyberattacks by declaring foreign computer hacks an act of war. But despite mounting evidence that Chinese attacks continue relentlessly, there has been no further action. In view of all the recent happenings, that’s tantamount to raising the white flag.The New York Times was not the only company hacked. That same day, The Wall Street Journal admitted it too had been infiltrated by Chinese hackers who apparently were trying to monitor its China coverage. And Bloomberg computers were infected by Chinese hackers after the company published an article on June 29, 2012 about the wealth accumulated by relatives of Xi Jinping, China’s vice president at the time.But media companies are not the only ones being breached. An Air Force Cyber Command Recruiting video on YouTube urgently proclaims, “This building will be attacked 3 million times today,” while hovering over the Pentagon. Those are blatant acts of war, people, and the daily siege of the Pentagon is just part of today’s cyber-warfare landscape.Cyberattacks are exploding. In Jan. 2010, Google, Intel, Adobe and and more than 30 other companies were attacked in a coordinated terrorist campaign. Google said the attacks originated in China, which lead the company to abandon the Chinese market. If Google leaves the world’s largest market, what does that say about the enemy?In January 2011, Morgan Stanley admitted it too had been hit by the same China-based hackers who attacked Google’s computers, an operation dubbed “Aurora” by cyber-security firm McAfee. Terremark Worldwide estimates that the number of companies known to be hacked in Operation Aurora now exceeds 200.While government organizations and companies spend vast amounts of money on security precautions, the situation is so dire that the Defense Department, whose Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) developed the Internet in the 1960s, “is beginning to think it created a monster,” reports Bloomberg BusinessWeek.What Should We Do?Let me repeat that again, the inventors of the Internet you like and use so much think they’ve created a monster! So what should we do?I believe we need a serious dose of innovation and reinvention to stem this monster tidal wave.America today spends about $718 billion on defense and security. Most of that money is spent on resources and equipment designed for old-fashioned warfare.The reality is that World War III is being fought in cyberspace and most real-life interaction will be handled by robots. And in both sectors our public and private capital spending priorities are completely misaligned.The global cyber security market was valued at $64 billion in 2011, or less than 10% of what the U.S. spends on defense and security. Major U.S. players include CA Technologies, Cisco Systems, Fortinet, IBM, McAfee and Symantec. International security firms include Check Point Software (Israel) and Kaspersky (Russia).Our venture capital scenario is not much better. In 2011, VCs collectively invested $935 million in tech security companies, nearly double the $498 million they invested in 2010, according to a MoneyTree report compiled by PricewaterhouseCoopers, the National Venture Capital Association and Thomson Reuters.Clearly, the U.S. cyber security market is woefully underfunded. As Delaware Senator Thomas Carper puts it, “The issue of Cyber Warfare is not science fiction any more. It’s reality.” Here’s what I believe we should do:* U.S. Defense Budget – America should reshape its defense budget to reflect the reality that World War III is already here and it’s being fought in the cyber trenches. This means the Pentagon should officially declare Chinese cyber attacks as foreign warfare and treat the matter with the utmost urgency.* Robotics – The worldwide robotics industry today is a $25 billion global industry, with most R&D activity taking place in South Korea and Japan. How can America allow its next-generation cyber-soldier technology to be based on foreign know-how? My recommendation: put the U.S. on a robotics fast-track with a combined government-private sector investment budget of $20 billion annually.* Cyber Security – Like the robotics industry, cyber security is in dire need of more attention, but it’s not very sexy. VCs are falling all over themselves to fund the next Facebook or Snapchat, but what if those services could no longer function because the Chinese brought the Internet to its knees with relentless denial-of-service attacks? That $1 billion VCs invested in 2011 in cyber security is a drop in the bucket compared to the Pentagon’s $718 billion budget. We need to ratchet this up to $5 billion, preferably $10 billion, by next year.* Internet 2 – As the pronouncements of DARPA suggest, the Internet was not designed for what it’s doing today. Please take some time to read this Bloomberg Businessweek story, it’s downright scary. We need to insulate this country from the enemy, and that means designing an all-new Internet, one created from the ground up for secure operations, and preferably one that insulates the U.S. from the rest of the world.I’m sure this last bit of advice will have free-thinkers around the world cringing. But when the Chinese decide that you’ve had enough freedom, it might be too late to come to your senses. I fully expect to be hacked by the Chinese this week.I’ve added Mandiant to my address book. I rather be safe than sorry. And please do contribute to my crowdsourced ideation engine to suggest more ideas on how we can protect ourselves in this brave new world.Image courtesy of Larry Ye / Shutterstock. Related Posts michael tchong IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…center_img Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Tags:#China#cybersecurity#Government#international#security#War last_img read more

TNT, SMB repulse foes

first_imgArellano zooms to 2-0 card WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding “It’s been very difficult for us,” the rookie coach answered when asked why such a talent-laden squad is running in the middle of the 12-team pack and is still a win out of the playoffs despite improving to 5-3. “Every day has been different for us, something always comes up.“As a team, we are unstable because of a lot of things—Gilas, import situation, Gilas, injuries and then Gilas again,” he said. “But again, that’s a sacrifice we have to make. Hopefully, we can (eventually) get our stride.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutRiding its superior local lineup, San Miguel Beer snapped a two-game losing streak after a 103-96 decision of Rain or Shine later in the night, improving to 4-3 overall and staying alive in the hunt for a top four berth.The Beermen got paltry numbers from outgoing import Terik Bridgeman—he was held to just four points—for the second straight game, but with four locals tossing in twin digits, San Miguel was able to put a halt to the Elasto Painters’ three-game winning streak. LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles03:02From UAAP to PBA, Austria and Racela renew coaching battle in finals02:11’Not just basketball’: Circumcisions, pageants at Philippine courts01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Rain or Shine dropped into a tie with the Beermen, who got 27 points from Chris Ross. MOST READcenter_img Read Next UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC PBA IMAGESTNT KaTropa led from start to finish on Wednesday night and brought down one of the leaders in the PBA Governors’ Cup in sister team Meralco, 113-107, at Smart Araneta Coliseum.After that, coach Nash Racela was still talking about the instability of his crew, which, he stressed, has been the main reason the Texters have been on and off in the season-closing conference.ADVERTISEMENT E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary View comments SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chieflast_img read more

LEVEL 4 REFEREES PRESENTERS

first_imgEvery now and again people achieve remarkable things in our sport, but very rarely do they receive recognition for their achievements. Over the past few weeks four people have gained their level 4 referee presenter status, Chris Harapa, Erene Devall, Scott Dews and Michael Rush. On the database of referee presenters there are only 100 people who have ever achieved this level and this award. Because of their remarkable achievement, we decided to take some time to focus on them and their involvement as Touch referees. Recently I asked each of them some questions about their involvement with Touch, what they love, what’s tough and what they see as the future of refereeing… CHRIS HARAPA: 1) When did you first start Touch refereeing and how long have you been refereeing? I first started refereeing about 1990 down at the Domain lunchtime competition in Sydney as a duty ref, before a friend suggested that I take it more seriously as I was a better ref than a player. I joined South Sydney Referees the following year and they helped me get my level 1. I had lots of help then because some of the best refs then officiated at Souths; Adam Foley, Gary Mournehis, Richard Lawry, Mark Sinclair (all level 6’s & still involved in the sport). I stopped refereeing 3 years ago due to nerve damage in my back and am currently a member of the NSW Referees Panel. 2) What makes refereeing difficult? The speed & intensity of the game as well as the different standards across the park. Referees also devote a lot of time and money to the sport and this makes it hard for them and their families. 3) What do you enjoy about refereeing? When I refereed it was the great camaraderie and friendships that will last a lifetime. Even now as a panel member, the buzz and excitement of a tournament and seeing everyone puts a smile on my face. Also the challenge of improving, attaining higher badge levels and getting better quality games. 4) When did you become interested in other aspects, such as referee presenting/coaching/observing? I had no choice in giving up refereeing because I was forced to give it away, but when the Director of Referees, Ian Matthew invited me to assist the panel for the first time, I jumped at the chance to stay involved and give something back. Presenting and coaching is all part of the job, and I love it. 5) What levels have you achieved in these areas? As a referee, I attained my Level 4 State badge. As a referees’ coach, I am now a level 3 and hope one day to get that L4 at a national tournament. As a presenter, L4 as you now know. I’m also a level 1 player coach. 6) What has been the highlight of your career? Any great memorable moments? Achieving my L4 state badge and getting that blue blazer. An unbelievable semi final game at the State Cup in 1996 between the two best Womens’ sides at the time, Easts v Cronulla which went down to 3 on 3 and helped me get my level 4 badge. Also, you can’t beat our Referees’ Grading Night when you see the smile on a referee’s face when they receive their blue blazer and you helped them get there! 7) Who has been a positive influence for you? All my fellow referees through the years, the NSW Referees Panel, Ian Matthew (Director), my daughter Leah who is an inspiration (I got her involved from the age of 9 and she still loves playing now at 20), my son and best mate Dan, and my wife Megan as she is the one that encourages me and helps me to stay in Touch. 8) What do you see in the future for Touch refereeing in Australia? I can see a bright future ahead. Being associated with so many people that are happy to give up their time and energy as well as a genuine love for what they do, we will only get better in what we do. We are continually developing improving and delivering our courses on a regular basis as well as providing our senior and experienced referees a means to becoming coaches & presenters to help in the development of our junior, female & emerging referees. ERENE DEVALL: 1) When did you first start Touch refereeing and how long have you been refereeing? I started in Kiama, NSW playing in 1980 and started refereeing as a L1 in 1983 (a life time ago) 2) What makes refereeing difficult? Its not difficult it just has lots of challenges. 3) What do you enjoy about refereeing? The people you meet from all walks of life 4) When did you become interested in other aspects, such as referee presenting/coaching/observing? When I started going through the levels as a referee. I have always been someone that likes to give something back – quite a few people helped me along the way – now its my turn. I also get a buzz out of seeing the people you help achieve their goals too. 5) What levels have you achieved in these areas? L4 Referee (retired when I became pregnant with my first child) L4 Coach and now L4 Presenter 6) What has been the highlight of your career? Any great memorable moments? Coaching a great friend of mine through the system from L1 through to L6 referee and being present when he received his L6 at NTL. Too many highlights to mention one in particular – there have been so many. 7) Who has been a positive influence for you? My husband has been the one to support and encourage me to achieve as I have, however, on the Touch Scene there are four people that have had the greatest influence on my career – Greg West, Ian Matthew, Lou Tomkins and Steve Fisher – they are part of the reason I stay involved. 8) What do you see in the future for Touch refereeing in Australia? I would like to see refereeing promoted as a sport within a sport – you either hate it or love it, there is no middle ground. I think that it does take a special type of person to become a Touch Referee. Within my career, thankfully, the highs definitely outweigh the lows. SCOTT DEWS: 1) When did you first start Touch refereeing and how long have you been refereeing? I have been refereeing since the early 90’s, I became more involved & committed when I watched my wife playing rep Touch and realised I could ref at that level. I did my first tournament in ’94. 2) What makes refereeing difficult? During my time when I stopped playing and concentrated on refereeing full time, the park players in open grades basically ran the games, until I gained their respect. Now the only difficult ones are the long term players, who still need the older rules to recover (Mainly women). 3) What do you enjoy about refereeing? To me being able to be involved in high level Touch games e.g.; Mens open NTL, Mens 20’s World Cup) is all the motivation I need. 4) When did you become interested in other aspects, such as referee presenting/coaching/observing? We need a level 1 coaching qualification to gain our state level badges, it was something I enjoyed, passing on information and assistance to developing referees.(My career now is adult training). 5) What levels have you achieved in these areas? I gained my level 6 at NTL’s ’03 and from that and State of Origin I was invited to referee at the Youth World Cup in ’05. 6) What has been the highlight of your career? Any great memorable moments? Gaining the level 6 and then refereeing at the Youth World Cup in 2005. 7) Who has been a positive influence for you? Ian Mathew and his panel have most definitely influenced my career. Ken Golden from this panel more than others, as he was the one that made me realise, I was the only one who could control my career as a referee. 8) What do you see in the future for Touch refereeing in Australia? There is now a new system for referees to follow which will bring more female and younger referees into Touch, this can only make it stronger. MICHAEL RUSH: 1) When did you first start Touch refereeing and how long have you been refereeing? I’ve been refereeing since 1991. 2) What makes refereeing difficult? Players not knowing the key rules & the minority who think its open season on refs on the field. 3) What do you enjoy about refereeing? The constant challenge during the game. You’re more involved in the game than as a player – or maybe that was just a problem with my playing! 4) When did you become interested in other aspects, such as referee presenting/coaching/observing? As part of the refs team at a local venue, you find that after a while you have the opportunity to offer support to new refs. Getting injured and not being able to ref as much also played a key role for me later on. 5) What levels have you achieved in these areas? Level 4 Presenter, Level 3 Referee Coach. 6) What has been the highlight of your career? Any great memorable moments? The memorable moments are when one of the refs you know achieves a goal (a Badge, or a level of game); but also when you see someone new come through and start to show interest in refereeing. 7) Who has been a positive influence for you? One of our Refs Directors here, when I started refereeing, got me interested in sticking with refereeing and having a look at the coordinating and coaching side. More recently getting to work with some of the senior referee coaches. Also, the refs you organise courses and coaching for – a lot of really dedicated people. 8) What do you see in the future for Touch refereeing in Australia? Very positive things. The arm of the sport continues to develop in terms of technical support offered. Refereeing offers a great challenge. The Presenters and Coaching qualifications offer the opportunity to set and achieve goals during and after your on-field career. Once again Touch Football Australia would like to take the opportunity to thank these referees for their contribution to refereeing and the development of our current and future Touch referees at all levels of the sport. We would also like to congratulate them on their own personal achievements and wish them all the best in their future endeavors. By Rachel Moylelast_img read more

10 months agoArsenal boss Emery: We can only make loan signings

first_imgArsenal boss Emery: We can only make loan signingsby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal manager Unai Emery has confirmed the club will only sign loan players this month. The Gunners want to bring Barcelona midfielder Denis Suarez to the Emirates, but are reluctant to part with a fee for the 25-year-old. And Emery has confirmed the club are only looking for temporary signings.”We cannot sign anyone permanently,” Emery said ahead of the Gunners’ game against West Ham on Saturday. “Only loan players this January.”Asked specifically about Suarez, Emery added: “I do not know his situation.”But I know the club is working for the possibility of players who can help us with this condition (on loan).” TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more