GANJA BILL TABLED IN SENATE

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppKINGSTON, Jan. 23 (JIS): A Bill which seeks to decriminalise ganja for medicinal, religious, and private/personal use was tabled in the Senate today (January 23).The Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act, 2015, was laid on the table by Minister of Justice, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding.The amendments will make the possession of small quantities of ganja, amounting to two ounces or less, a non-arrestable but ticketable infraction, attracting a fine payable outside of the court, but not resulting in the possessor attaining a criminal record.However, failure to pay the monetary penalty will be deemed a minor offence punishable in the Petty Sessions Court by an order for community service.The legislation prohibits the smoking of ganja in public spaces, subject to specified exemptions.Proposed changes to the Act will also facilitate ganja being used for therapeutic purposes, as prescribed by a registered practitioner, or for scientific research conducted by an accredited tertiary institution or otherwise approved by the Scientific Research Council (SRC).The changes will enable the use of ganja in religious engagements by stakeholders, such as Rastafarians.The Bill also makes provisions for the creation of a Cannabis Licensing Authority to regulate the proposed hemp and medicinal ganja industry in Jamaica. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Consultation on Gaming Policy 2015 Recommended for you Police execute search warrants and get Ganja; questioning man in cutlass crooks case Related Items:bill, dangerous rugs act, ganja, petty session court, scientific research council PM Tables Sexual Harassment Billlast_img read more

The best sunscreens to buy right now

first_img 1 Personal care Now playing: Watch this: How to choose the right sunscreen Sunscreen is a contentious product because there’s often a lot of disagreement on which sunscreen chemicals are safe, what SPF is appropriate and whether sunscreen harms coral reefs or not. Here’s what you should know about sunscreen in 2019: 1. Everyone should wear sunscreen, regardless of your skin color, because anyone can get skin cancer. 2. Sunscreen protects against both UV damage and wrinkles. 3. Both chemical and physical sunscreens are considered effective and safe. Chemical sunscreens contain active ingredients such as oxybenzone, avobenzone, homosalate, octinoxate, octisalate, and octocrylene that absorb UV radiation. 4. Physical sunscreens — with zinc oxide, titanium dioxide or both as active ingredients — are good for those with sensitive skin and acne-prone skin, and new formulas are much easier to blend than earlier, chalky versions. 5. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends using broad-spectrum protection with SPF 30 sunscreen, which blocks UVA and UVB rays. UVA rays speeds up the aging process of skin cells and promote wrinkles, while UVB rays damage skin cells, cause sunburns and are believed to cause skin cancer. 6. No sunscreen can block 100% of UV rays. SPF 30 sunscreens block 97% of UVB rays, and at SPFs above that, the increased protection is negligible.  7. All sunscreens, regardless of SPF, rub off or break down on your skin in the course of 2 hours — even faster if you’re swimming or sweating. 8. The state of Hawaii; Key West, Florida; and a few island nations have banned sunscreens with oxybenzone because a scientific study found that it can kill coral. Currently, none of these bans are in effect — the two in the US start in 2021. Some companies are selling “reef-safe” sunscreens that abide by the ban. These products and services are independently chosen by our editors. CNET may get a share of the revenue if you buy anything featured on our site. The prices are accurate as of publishing time, but may change. The best sunscreens for 2019 71rmjydspal-sl1500 Hawaiian Tropic Best everyday body sunscreen Hawaiian Tropic Sheer Touch Ultra Radiance Sunscreen Lotion SPF 30  This is the sunscreen I currently have and use because it feels lightweight and rubs in easily. It’s like putting on lotion, and it moisturizes like lotion because it has shea butter. Be forewarned this has a subtle shimmer to it, so you’ll look ever-so-slightly glittery. $7.92 at AmazonHate any and all glitter? Try Banana Boat’s Sun Comfort Broad Spectrum Sunscreen Lotion (SPF 50, $10.06 at Amazon) for a similar hydrating option. Best sunscreen for kids 6887033-nocolor-0 Neutrogena Neutrogena Wet Skin Kids Sunscreen Spray Kids rarely want to sit still long enough for you to apply (and reapply) sunscreen. But this formula goes on quickly and is meant to work on wet skin. The spray cuts through water to adhere to skin, so your kids stay protected even as they spend all day getting in and out of the pool. $10.50 for two at Amazonsupergoop-sunscreen Supergoop Best facial sunscreen Supergoop Smooth and Poreless Matte Mineral Sunscreen SPF 40 If you have ever struggled to rub in the white cast left behind by mineral sunscreens, only to end up looking like a ghost, this is your new sunscreen. In recent years, Supergoop has been cranking out new formulas for any need — like powder sunscreen you can swipe on over your makeup during the day — great for oily skin! — or a sunscreen oil that holds in moisture on your skin. I picked up the brand’s Smooth and Poreless at Sephora on a whim, and it’s what I currently use on my face. Of any facial sunscreen I’ve used, I’ve loved this the most because it feels like a primer and blurs my pores. It’s not definitely not cheap, but it’s worth the cost for me. For a cheaper facial sunscreen, check out the Asian sunscreen pick below. $38 at Sephora Best facial sunscreen for sensitive skin EltaMD UV Clear Broad-Spectrum SPF 46 eltamd EltaMD This EltaMD sunscreen is well-loved because despite the fact that it uses zinc oxide, it goes on clear and blends into your skin without leaving a white cast. I’ve tried it firsthand and it glides on so well, you don’t feel like you’re wearing sunscreen. Just be careful when shopping to make sure you buy it directly from Amazon, not a third-party seller, because there are Amazon shoppers who’ve reported receiving counterfeit products. (Shown is the SPF 40 version, but I’ve linked to the SPF 46 version.) $28 at Amazon Best sunscreen for babies Blue Lizard Australian Baby Sunscreen SPF 30+ 81kcksitq5l-sl1500 Blue Lizard Doctors recommend that you limit your baby’s sun exposure with hats, clothing and shade and that you not use sunscreen on infants under six months. Once they reach the six-month milestone, you can use sunscreen, but stick to formulas that are free of dyes and scents and that use minerals (zinc oxide and titanium dioxide) for sun protection. This Blue Lizard formula checks all of those boxes and the bottle turns pink in the sun, to give you a nudge to reapply. $14.98 at Amazon Best sport sunscreen 71aotbrtj1l-sl1500 Neutrogena Neutrogena Beach Defense (Spray, Lotion or Stick)  Sport and water-resistant sunscreens can feel thick and greasy, but I like Neutrogena’s Beach Defense line because it’s more lightweight, water resistant for up to 80 minutes and smells like a tropical beverage. The spray is easy to apply, is water- and sweat-resistant for up to 80 minutes and comes in SPF 70. If you want or need something without a scent, try Banana Boat’s Simply Protect Sports sunscreen, which doesn’t have any added fragrance. $8.79 at Amazon for the spray Best Asian sunscreen Biore UV Aqua Rich Watery Essence Sunscreen SPF 50 613lfin0xul-sl1000 Biore Okay, if you are a skin care nerd like I am, prepare to fall down the Asian sunscreen rabbit hole. South Korean and Japanese skin care brands have become well known for sunscreens that use different chemicals than what’s approved by the FDA in order to provide superior protection. One of the most wildly popular Asian sunscreens is Biore’s, which is a thin, light formula that blends in easily. While you can’t find it in US stores — because of the FDA — they are readily available on Amazon and other retailers, like YesStyle. Just know that these products will ship from Asia, and have to go through customs, so they will almost certainly not arrive within the two-day Prime window. $12.58 at AmazonAnother great option is the COSRX Aloe Soothing Sun Cream SPF50 PA+++ ($12.86) because it applies like a lightweight moisturizer and provides hydration too. If you have sensitive skin, give this formula a try. Share your voice 5:36center_img Sina Schuldt/picture alliance via Getty Images Any doctor will tell you that sunscreen is the secret to great skin. Not only does sunscreen help prevent skin cancer, it also stops the sun’s rays from breaking down the collagen in your skin, which leads to wrinkles and sagging. More than ever before, companies have finally started making sunscreens that you’ll actually want to use. I’m talking facial sunscreens that apply and blend like makeup primer, spray sunscreens you can reapply to your kids right after they jump out of the pool and lightweight lotions you’ll reach for every day. There are now so many brands and great options that finding the best sunscreens available is a big task. The list below scratches the surface, highlighting some of the best-selling sunscreens on Amazon, plus a few formulas that make sunscreen much more palatable to wear.  Read more: La Roche-Posay My Skin Track UV, Shade, Sunburn Alert: How to measure your sun exposure when you’re outside   Tags Comment I got my face professionally scanned for wrinkles and…last_img read more

Startup Playi using friendly robots to teach kids computer programming

first_img(Phys.org) —Startup Play-i has created a crowd-sourcing campaign to gather funds for building and selling its pair of robots called Bo and Yana—both are part of an overall toy design to teach children as young as five years old, to program a computer. The idea, the team says, is to get children interested in programming by making it a part of storytelling. Citation: Startup “Play-i” using friendly robots to teach kids computer programming (2013, October 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-startup-play-i-friendly-robots-kids.html More information: www.play-i.com/ The two robots look and behave differently. Yana has three wheels and can roll around, it can also play its little xylophone if programmed to do so. Yana, which the creative team behind the robots calls the storyteller, is able to make different recognizable sounds on demand.The team behind Play-i is a collection of people who used to work for big tech companies such as Google, Apple and Frog Design. They started their company with the idea that children are capable of learning sophisticated concepts if they are presented in the right way. Bo and Yana are programmed using kid-friendly icons on a smartphone or tablet (since the operating system is iOS, that means iPhone and iPad, at least for now). To get either of the robots to do something, children develop a story around what it is they want done, then use the icons to develop the story, which results in the robots carrying out actions that follow what they’ve described. One example would be having Bo retrieve a flower from another robot, or a person, then carry it to someone else for presentation. Yana on the other hand can be taught to emit a sound like a helicopter if someone touches it. The concept is simple, by breaking down something that seems complex into something that is actually small parts of a story, children can develop more complex programs.The Play-i team is also looking to the future with their robots—code that is created from the icons is displayed on the tablet screen so that the child can see what they have wrought—as they grow older they can progress to writing code directly, giving them even more control over their toys.The crowd-funding campaign has a goal of collecting $250,000, if that number is reached, Play-i says the robots will be available for purchase by this summer, likely priced at $199 and $69 for Bo and Yana respectively. Explore furthercenter_img © 2013 Phys.org Dash Robotics crowdfunding ‘origami’ runner you can assemble at home This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

How to Get Funding Act Like You Dont Need It

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. 3 min read This story appears in the October 2012 issue of . Subscribe » Register Now » Here’s one way to raise more money in a seed round: Say, “No thanks.” That’s what Zain Jaffer and Jack Smith, founders of the Vungle mobile ad platform, did when a bevy of heavyweight investors clamored to get a piece of their company as it exited the hot San Francisco incubator AngelPad.The two say they weren’t initially interested in securing funding; they didn’t want to deal with the pressure of fighting for control with investors. But as tech luminaries like Google Ventures, AOL Ventures, Crosslink Capital and angel investors SoftTech VC, SV Angel, 500 Startups and Tim Draper started knocking on their door, it was tough to turn down the cash. They closed on $2 million in January.”When we said we didn’t have any more room for investors, they thought it was a bluffing tactic, so they pushed slightly harder,” says Smith, who moved with Jaffer from London in 2011 to take part in AngelPad. They launched Vungle in beta this year.The investors wanted in on the duo’s ability to tap into the rapidly growing world of mobile advertising, a sector worth $1.45 billion in 2011 and expected to reach $2.61 billion this year, according to eMarketer. Vungle takes screen grabs and video from apps in action to build the equivalent of a movie trailer for its clients. Because the spots are structured like trailers, they “give you more of a flavor of the application’s features and appearance,” Jaffer says.Vungle’s app trailers are absurdly cheap and easy to make. Armed with experience in video production, the founders can turn around a finished production in as little as 24 hours–no need for pricey designs and programming. The cost: free (for now) with a commitment to buy a mobile ad campaign that starts at a few thousand dollars.Distribution comes from developers who’ve embedded a simple Vungle code into their apps so that the trailers can appear at natural breaks in the action, such as the completion of a game level or task. That’s how it works on faceBlocker, an app that allows users to blur certain faces or details on a photograph. As users make their way through the app, a 15-second Vungle trailer will play at a natural pause point.David Silverman, partner at San Francisco-based Crosslink Capital, loves Vungle’s take on in-app advertising. He says the ability to capture a segment of this market is “the fundamental piece” to what will be a profitable business.Smith and Jaffer are hard at work expanding Vungle’s client base beyond the 20 or so it has now and getting themselves on the radar of app developers whose business models depend on advertising. “Until now, if you wanted to run a video ad campaign for or in your app, good luck,” Jaffer says. “We figured out how to make it easy.” November 5, 2012last_img read more

Have You Considered Using Blockchain as Part of Your Marketing

first_img Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. The digital age is upon us, and it is unsparing in its reach. Every aspect of a company needs innovating in order for the organization as a whole to stay ahead of the competition.Related: 4 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Embrace the Next Phase of Digital Maturity, ‘Cognitive Transformation’In this world of demanding consumers, then, catching their attention via effective messaging is vital to begin any relationship, and only continued — and excellent — marketing will sustain a loyal customer base in a time of constant disruption.Here are five ways to build a better marketing strategy using innovative technology, and to stay ahead of the game in the digital age.1. Use blockchain as a tool to reach consumers.Today’s web ecosystem is one of interconnected subcommunities. The vast scope and nuances of these communities can make it hard to segment them into distinct, targetable groups. It also makes it harder to reach these distinct communities without an intermediary. However, technology like the blockchain is making it easier than ever to reach out directly to these types of groups.Related: When It Comes to Innovation, Go Big or Go HomeThe potential of a marketing tool to be able to reach a global community in a hyper-targeted, peer-to-peer fashion is on the horizon. If the disruption blockchain is capable of is any indication, this tech should be keeping status quo web marketers up at night.2. Target connected channels.Web channels and forums are based on interests, but are completely sustained by the free flow of information, relationships and exchange among their members. While some tend to be static or exclusive, many are constantly growing, sharing and adapting organisms. Finding and targeting these communities should be a key plank in any effective marketing strategy.For example, blockchain content platforms like DAC are global, decentralized and absolutely dependent on the constant communication and exchange of information among their members. For DAC, this means using blockchain technology to incentivize audio content creators and their fans to build and develop a robust content community..The blockchain-based audio-content website model aims to create and foster a sense of community among music fans across the world. In today’s web, messaging to one of these members is a way to message to his or her entire network — which should have any savvy CMO champing at the bit.3. Incentivize a community of supporters.The digital age has created many new channels for companies to reach their target audience, but many established digital marketing techniques have become less effective in recent years. Instead of solely advertising a message to your audience, you can achieve more impactful outcomes by incentivizing that audience with benefits that turn its members into active supporters of your company.Blockchain startup Agora, which offers end-to-end verifiable voting technology, has incentivized an audience through its token bounty program as well as the company’s core product. Agora has engaged its community by offering rewards to those who share its message on social media and other channels.Agora has also built reward mechanisms into its own voting platform. Through one such mechanism, governments can reward voters, using Agora’s tokens, for casting a ballot, which may ultimately serve to increase global political participation.4. AI has already arrived, and it’s smarter than you.Once the stuff of science fiction, artificial intelligence has recently exploded in scale and practicality. It is showing tremendous promise as a tool for marketing and messaging. As companies like Google develop efficient and effective marketing AI, incorporating this tech into future marketing plans will be crucial for any company that wishes to survive.Self-taught AI will be able to create more efficient algorithms than any human is capable of programming, meaning that customers will be reached more precisely and effectively than ever before.AI could even be responsible for creating marketing content, instantly adjusting its messaging according to user response. Anyone expecting to keep up with the growing number of platforms and segmentations that will define the digital age must begin to understand and embrace artificial intelligence as the uber-tool it will become.5. Big data is only getting bigger — so, use it.The current juggernaut technology in online advertising is the aptly named Big Data. Collected from the web habits of billions of users, this data is used by advertisers to classify and predict the habits of its consumers. Big Data will only get more important as the internet continues to grow and influence more aspects of our lives.Related: How Blockchain Is Creating a New Future for Digital MarketingThe internet of things (IoT) will be the interconnected network of all appliances and machines in one’s life. For example, sensors detecting the temperature will be able to communicate and adjust every appliance in the household to the ideal setting. This expanded network will create increased amounts of data, all of it useful for marketing purposes and targeting. The company that successfully models this IoT data will be able to conquer the future of marketing.How do you think technology can influence the future of marketing? March 15, 2018 5 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more

Stack Overflow survey data further confirms Pythons popularity as it moves above

first_imgThis year’s Stack Overflow Developer Survey results provided a useful insight into how the programming language ecosystem is evolving. Perhaps the most remarkable – if unsurprising – insight was the continued and irresistible rise of Python. This year, for the first time, it finished higher in the rankings than Java. We probably don’t need another sign that Python is taking over the world, but this is certainly another one to add to the collection. What we already know about Python’s popularity as a programming language Okay, so the Stack overflow survey results weren’t that surprising because Python’s growth is well-documented. The language has been shooting up the TIOBE rankings, coming third for the first time back in September 2018. The most recent ranking has seen it slip to fourth ( C++ is making a resurgence – but that’s a story for another time…), but it isn’t in decline – it’s still growing. In fact, despite moving back into fourth, it’s still growing at the fastest rate of any programming language, with 2.36% growth in its rating. For comparison, C++’s rate of growth in the rankings is 1.62%. But it’s not just about TIOBE rankings. Even back in September 2017 the Stack Overflow team were well aware of Python’s particularly astonishing growth in high-income countries. Read next: 8 programming languages to learn in 2019 Python’s growth in the Stack Overflow survey since 2013 It has been pretty easy to trace the growth in the use of Python through the results of every recent Stack Overflow survey. From 2016, it has consistently been on the up: 2013: 21.9% (6th position in the rankings) 2014: 23.4% (again, 6th position in the rankings) 2015: 23.8% (6th) 2016: 24.9% (6th) 2017: 32% (moving up to 5th…) 2018: 38.8% (down to 7th but with a big percentage increase) 2019: 41.7% (4th position) But more interestingly, it would seem that this growth in usage has been driving demand for it. Let’s take a look at how things have changed in the ‘most wanted’ programming language since 2015 – this is the “percentage of developers who are not developing with the language or technology but have expressed interest in developing with it:” 2015: 14.8% (3rd) 2016: 13.3% (4th) 2017: 20.6% (1st) 2018: 25.1% (1st) 2019: 25.7% (1st) Alongside that, it’s also worth considering just how well-loved Python is. A big part of this is probably the fact that Python is so effective for the people using it, and helps them solve the problems they want to solve. Those percentages are growing, even though it didn’t take top position this year (this is described by Stack Overflow as the “percentage of developers who are developing with the language or technology and have expressed interest in continuing to develop with it”): 2015: 66.6% (10th position) 2016: 62.5% (9th) 2017: 62.7% (6th) 2018: 68% (3rd) 2019: 73.1% (2nd, this time pipped by Rust to the top spot) What’s clear here is that Python has a really strong foothold both in the developer mind share (ie. developers believe it’s something worth learning) and in terms of literal language use. Obviously, it’s highly likely that both things are related – but whatever the reality, it’s good to see that process happening in data from the last half a decade. Read next: 5 blog posts that could make you a better Python programmer What’s driving the popularity of Python? The obvious question, then, is why Python is growing so quickly. There are plenty of theories out there, and there are certainly plenty of blog posts on the topic. But ultimately, Python’s popularity boils down to a few key things. Python is a flexible language One of the key reasons for Python’s growth is its flexibility. It isn’t confined to a specific domain. This would go some way of explaining its growth – because it’s not limited to a specific job role or task, a huge range of developers are finding uses for it. This has a knock on effect – because the community of users continues to grow, there is much more impetus on developing tools that can support and facilitate the use of Python in diverse domains. Indeed, with the exception of JavaScript, Python is a language that many  developers experience through its huge range of related tools and libraries. The growth of data science and machine learning While Python isn’t limited to a specific domain, the immense rise in interest in machine learning and data analytics has been integral to Python’s popularity. With so much data available to organizations and their employees, Python is a language that allows them to actually leverage it. Read next: Why is Python so good for AI and Machine Learning? 5 Python Experts Explain Python’s easy to learn The final key driver of Python’s growth is the fact that it is relatively easy to learn. It’s actually a pretty good place to begin if you’re new to programming. Going back to the first point, it’s precisely because it’s flexible that people that might not typically write code or see themselves as developers could see Python as a neat solution to a problem they’re trying to solve. Because it’s not a particularly steep learning curve, it introduces these people to the foundational elements of programming. Something which can only be a good thing, right? The future of Python It’s easy to get excited about Python’s growth, but what’s particularly intriguing about it is what it can indicate about the wider software landscape. That’s perhaps a whole new question, but from a burgeoning army of non-developer professionals powered by Python to every engineer wanting to unlock automation, it would appear that the growth of Python both a response and a symptom of significant changes.last_img read more