Brisbane suburbs that buyers love so much it will take decades for them to leave

first_img 0-5km Herston 17.9South Brisbane 15.9Herston 14.9West End 14.5Auchenflower 14.4Geebung 14.1Petrie Terrace 14 5-10km More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North2 hours agoNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by Eagle Farm 18.5Mansfield 16.5Nathan 15.1McDowall 14.6Tennyson 14.4Bethania 14.2Everton Park 14.0 11-15km Robertson 15.9Macgregor 15.6Bunya 15.5Darra 15.5Wishart 15.3Upper Mount Gravatt 15.2 16-20km Ellen Grove 16Rochedale South 13.7Woodridge 13.4Springwood 12.9Capalaba 12.6 BRISBANE COUNCIL TIGHTEST HELD: Eagle Farm 18.5 years Herston 17.9 yearsMansfield 16.5 yearsEllen Grove 16 years Robertson 15.9 years South Brisbane 15.9 yearsMacgregor 15.6 years (Source: CoreLogic) Ron and Donna Payne have lived in Greater Brisbane’s Bahrs Scrub for over 25 years and only just decided to downsize to the coast. Picture: Annette DewTHESE are the Brisbane suburbs that buyers love the most – where once they get a foothold, it takes about a quarter of a century for them to leave.Two-thirds of suburbs in the Queensland capital region were so tightly held they averaged 10.9 years before their owners put their homes up for sale, with the longest coming out of Bahrs Scrub, 23km from the Brisbane CBD.The suburbs were diverse from inner-ring suburbs of Eagle Farm and Herston to Mansfield, Sheldon, Ellen Grove, Park Ridge and Robertson across the wide middle ring.For those who have been sitting on property for as long as several decades, there could be a windfall ahead though, with land so tight, developers have come knocking in sleepy suburbs.“Changes in zoning can be a motivating factor for developers to start knocking on doors,” Mr Pressley said.Houses in high demand South Brisbane were also among the hardest to get hold of, averaging 15.9 years before owners let them go – which was exactly the same holding period as Coochie Mudlo 32km from the CBD.Buyers agent Simon Pressley of Propertyology said emotion was the strongest driver in those markets – though in some places like the much-maligned Coochie Mudlo market it was more about resale potential.“Mostly people have a strong emotional connection,” he said. “For a person who really aspires to an acreage lifestyle in the capital city, having pursued that dream and achieved it, something really significant has to happen in their life for them to let go of that.”He said for somewhere like Eagle Farm where the average hold period was 18.5 years, it was about lifestyle.“It’s often something they’ve always aspired for and it will take a heck of a lot of effort given multimillion-dollar construction all around and they will stay there until retired.”Ron and Donna Payne were among those who have spent a quarter of a century in one place, buying acreage in Bahrs Scrub 25 years ago. Mr Payne said having children leave home was good timing to put their six bedroom home on the market – complete with tennis court, pool and stunning scenery.Their agent Quy Early of QMT Realty said development was rapidly arriving to the area which had the last acreage between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.“On the other side of the motorway you’ve got huge developments happening with normal suburban blocks and these acreage blocks will be in big demand in future.”He said culture might be playing a role in boosting hold periods in some suburbs, including Mansfield, Macgregor, Wishart and Darra.“Those are everyday, run-of-the-mill Brisbane suburbs. They have the same characteristics north, south and west of the CBD with no unique features. You can’t put finger as to why they’re held longer. Sometimes people of different cultures can stick together but we can’t be certain.”The shortest hold period for property in Brisbane was two years out of Yarrabilba in Logan and 1.8 years at Springfield Central, both places where substantial new development has taken place in recent years. GREATER BRISBANE SUBURBS RESIDENTS DON’T WANT TO LEAVE: Bahrs Scrub (Logan) 25.5 yearsEagle Farm (Brisbane) 18.5 yearsHerston (Brisbane) 17.9 yearsMansfield (Brisbane) 16.5 yearsSheldon (Redland) 16.3 yearsEllen Grove (Brisbane) 16 yearsPark Ridge (Logan) 15.9 yearsRobertson (Brisbane) 15.9 yearsSouth Brisbane (Brisbane) 15.9 yearsCoochie Mudlo Island (Redland) 15.9 yearsMacgregor (Brisbane) 15.6 yearsBunya (Moreton Bay) 15.5 yearsDarra (Brisbane) 15.5 years (Source: CoreLogic)center_img 21-25km Bahrs Scrub 25.5Sheldon 16.3Logan Central 13.5Daisy Hill 12.7Boronia Heights 12.4 (Source: CoreLogic)last_img read more

Wire-to-wire Fairhaven win for Lizzie Prior

first_img4 May 2015 Wire-to-wire Fairhaven win for Lizzie Prior Teenage international Lizzie Prior pulled off an impressive wire-to-wire victory in the girls’ championship at the weather-hit Fairhaven Trophies in Lancashire.“I was gunning for a win, but it’s a lot nicer to know I started in the lead and ended in the lead – that’s definitely an achievement for me,” said Prior, from Burhill in Surrey. She was five-under par for 54 holes and won by three shots.England also retained the Nations Cup, thanks to Hollie Muse (West Lancashire), Toby Briggs (Dunston Hall) and George Gardner (Castle Royle) who won by four shots from Ireland. Muse, who was joint runner-up in the girls’ event, was also in last year’s winning team.Briggs came close to giving England a clean sweep of the titles. He finished runner-up in the boys’ championship, two strokes behind Sweden’s Joacim Ahlund.The tournament was hit by heavy overnight rain after the second round and the final day’s play was reduced from 36 holes to 18. When play finally got underway, conditions were excellent. “It was bright and sunny, really nice,” said Prior.She came to this event with memories of last year, when she shared the lead at the halfway stage, only to stay in the slipstream as Lancashire’s Sophie Lamb played the last two rounds in nine-under par.This time, Prior was determined to win: “I wasn’t going for second!” she said afterwards.She opened her account with a score of three-under 72 which led the girls’ event by a shot from rivals including another girl international, Emma Allen of Hampshire. She added level par on the second day, when breezy, wet conditions made scoring tricky, and extended her lead to two shots. A final round of two-under 73 clinched it for her and she finished three clear of Muse and Scotland’s Shannon McWilliam.Briggs, meanwhile, was moving steadily up the leaderboard in the boys’ event after sharing 29th place on three-over 75 after the first round. He scored level par 72 on the second day, helped by holing a fairway shot for an eagle two on the par four seventh. It moved him into a group of players who shared fourth place, which also included Sam Done (Kenwick Park).In the final round Briggs, an U16 international from Norfolk, returned two-under 70 for a total of one-over par. It set a challenging target for the remaining four players to chase – and only Ahlund got past him. Done, who scored 71 in the last round, took third placeClick here for full scoreslast_img read more

Sammy scores her first US win

first_img Tags: England teams, Roehampton Golf Club, Sammy Fuller, USA college golf, Women’s Golf 21 Sep 2018 Sammy scores her first US win England international Sammy Fuller has just won her first tournament on the US women’s college circuit, less than a year after she had a kidney removed.Fuller, a student at Keiser University in Florida, shot four-under par over three rounds on the Palmer course at PGA National and won by 12 shots.The 19-year-old from Roehampton, Surrey, established a three-shot lead over the first 36 holes and finished with a bogey-free round of three under.“This was a great achievement for Sammy, especially after having a kidney removed earlier this year,” commented her father, Ashley.The PGA National has always been a good hunting ground for Fuller who won five straight Honda Junior Classics there.She has recently returned to her US university after a successful summer’s golf when her results included finishing runner-up in the English women’s match play championship. Fuller, who first played for England as a 14-year-old, was on duty this summer in the Women’s Home Internationals.Image copyright Leaderboard Photographylast_img read more