Cameron: WI cricket on the rise again

first_img Revival process KOLKATA, India (CMC): Embattled West Indies Cricket Board president Dave Cameron believes the region’s recent success on the international stage shows that West Indies cricket is on the rise again. He has also given the assurance that the recent pay dispute with players has been “amicably settled”. He was speaking on Friday after West Indies beat tournament favourites India on Thursday to reach the final of the Twenty20 World Cup for the second time in three competitions. West Indies Women also advanced to the final of the T20 World Cup for the first time when they defeated New Zealand Women also on Thursday. And with the Under-19 Windies side having captured the ICC Youth World Cup earlier this year, Cameron said it was proof that West Indies cricket was “headed in the right direction.” “It is the beginning of the revival process,” Cameron told the Times of India newspaper. “We have put in place a robust system that will take some more time to churn out the results we want. The success of our U-19, ladies and men’s team proves that we are headed in the right direction”. Once World champions, West Indies have slipped to the bottom of international cricket in recent years, following poor results, especially in the Test and one-day formats. They are ranked number eight in Tests, the lowest of all major cricket nations and only above Bangladesh and Zimbabwe, and are ninth in ODIs, resulting in their non-qualification for next year’s Champions Trophy in England. However, Cameron said the WICB had made key structural changes which would see the continued rise of West Indies cricket. “Before 2005, we had an amateurish set-up in first-class cricket, where players only got to play just five four-day matches in a season. We have now replaced that with a professional set-up and players get to play at least 10 matches,” the Jamaican explained. He added: “We have 15 players who are currently contracted to the WICB. Besides this, we have 90 others who are contracted to the six regional franchises. The franchise teams currently compete in the four-day WICB Professional League as well as the one-day WICB Super 50 Tournament. “Currently, 11 women players are centrally contracted. They played some good cricket to get into the WT20 final for the first time and we hope they will go all the way.”last_img read more

Giants make big schedule change for night games at AT&T

first_imgThe Giants can’t promise they’ll get off to a better start in 2019, but at least their night games will be getting off to earlier starts.In a letter to season ticket holders, Giants president Larry Baer revealed weeknight game times at AT&T will begin at 6:45 p.m., 30 minutes earlier than previous seasons.Baer said the earlier starting times for home games on Monday through Thursday will “better serve fans and families during the work week.”The Giants’ “Orange Fridays” will continue to start …last_img read more

Cape Town’s World Cup winter boost

first_imgCape Town Stadium with the harbour andpart of the V&A Waterfront at right, withTable Bay beyond. Tourist accommodationnear the city bowl was 90% full in the finalweek of the 2010 Fifa World Cup.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com image library)MEDIA CONTACTS• Skye Grove, communication managerCape Town Tourism+27 21 487 6800skye@capetown.travel• Tammy WhiteRabbit in a Hat Communications+27 21 447 3197 or +27 73 202 5041tammy@rabbitinahat.co.zaMary AlexanderCape Town, foreign tourists’ favourite South African city, is set to enjoy long-term benefits from successfully hosting the 2010 Fifa World Cup by building its reputation as a special-events destination in the winter off-season.The city is immensely popular during summer, with its sunny and dry Mediterranean climate, but tourists tend to stay away during its cold, windy and wet winters.“Our focus has never been on the short term benefits of hosting this event, but rather on maximising the long term benefits and changing the opinion the world has of us, converting soccer fans into fans of Cape Town,” said Mariette du Toit-Helmbold, head of Cape Town Tourism.“Our aim is to double the economic impact of tourism by 2020 and the successful hosting of the World Cup in Cape Town in winter will definitely make this target more attainable.”This week Cape Town Tourism is launching a campaign to promote the city as a winter destination, with advertising on radio and billboards in Gauteng province, and internationally on TripAdvisor, a major online travel portal. TripAdvisor named Cape Town one of the world’s top 25 destinations in its Travellers’ Choice 2010 Best Destinations Awards.During the World Cup Cape Town Tourism conducted weekly surveys to determine visitor behaviour, choices and trends, and assess the city’s tourism industry’s attitude towards to event.It found that while tourist numbers and bookings were a lot higher than the same period in 2009, they did not live up to the winter peak season anticipated during the World Cup.Nonetheless, 90% of survey respondents agreed that the tournament had had a positive impact on Cape Town as a destination, and 62% agreed that it had helped to counter seasonality.Felicity Purchase, the Cape Town city council‘s head of economic development and tourism, said hosting major events in the Cape Town winter would help boost the city’s economy.“The City of Cape Town has developed an events policy and is now working on a post-2010 World Cup events strategy,” she said. “Events can play an important role in addressing seasonality, which is one of the greatest stumbling blocks in the development of Cape Town as a year-round tourism destination.”While official visitor numbers have not yet been released, the survey, the results of which have been published online, found that the average occupancy level for the 30 days of the 2010 Fifa World Cup was an estimated 55%, some 15% up on the same period in 2009. Bookings rose by at least 30% over the tournament’s final fortnight, with an average of some 70% for the Cape Town metropolitan area.Tourist accommodation in the vicinity of the city bowl and the Cape Town Stadium obviously benefited the most, with 90% occupancy in the final week of the World Cup.International arrivals at Cape Town International Airport from 11 June to 16 July – the final match was on 11 July – were 24% higher than in the same period in 2009. These included an increase in chartered flights, in addition to scheduled international flights. Domestic arrivals were up by 8%.The V&A Waterfront, Table Mountain cableway and other major Cape Town attractions confirmed that visitor numbers higher than those of the 2009 season. More than that, World Cup tourists spent up to four times as much as regular winter visitors.Cape Town Tourism’s 18 visitor centres reported a 47% increase in visitors from kickoff to the final match of the World Cup compared to 11 June to 11 July 2009, with international visitors up by 77% and locals by 15%.Most international tourists came from the UK and US, but there were also significant numbers from South America and the Far East – new markets for Cape Town that tourism officials plan to expand with media and trade campaigns.“We have to follow up the raised profile that our city has garnered as a result of a highly successful World Cup with real, visible, accessible offers that speak to a world still battling their way through tough times,” said Du Toit-Helmbold of Cape Town Tourism.“We are in a unique and incredibly fortunate position to have seen so much positive coverage on television this year. Now it’s up to us to convert that into tangible tourism results through showing that we offer great value.”last_img read more

Five Industry Flame Wars No One Cares About Anymore

first_imgTags:#browser#Firefox#Linux#Microsoft#Microsoft Office#Netscape#OpenOffice#Windows Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts There once was a time when Microsoft was evil, open source was the underdog and flamewars between the two camps were frequent and fierce. Those were the days! Today the industry has traded those early wars for equally vociferous fights between Android and iOS adherents, or HTML5 vs. native mobile application development. However, given how the early battles have faded, it’s likely that today’s nasty flame wars will be tomorrow’s distant memories.Don’t believe me? Let’s see if you still care about these epic brawls of the 2000s.Windows vs. LinuxAs religious wars go, few can top this blood feud. Coming at the height of Microsoft’s market dominance, Linux was the open-source upstart that promised to topple the evil empire, spreading peace, love and open source to all. Microsoft was not amused.Though the Redmond initially tried to discredit Linux as “un-American,” labeling it “a cancer” in 2001. When that didn’t work, in 2003 Microsoft launched its infamous “Get the Facts” campaign, which was long on propaganda and short on facts, then doubled down on the campaign in 2005. When this didn’t work, either, Microsoft got its lawyers involved, dropping an unsubstantiated bombshell that Linux infringed 235 of its Windows patents. The open sourcerors fought back, alleging that Windows infringed on Linux’s intellectual property. Throughout it all, CIOs bought both Windows and Linux servers en masse, while dumping expensive Unix servers. This ultimately seems to have cooled tempers, with Linux dominating in new markets like cloud computing even as Windows remains strong for more traditional enterprise workloads. A new pragmatism seems to govern server OS choice.As for the Linux desktop, it never really caught on, despite its adherents’ fondest hopes. But this also hasn’t mattered, as mobile has displaced the desktop as the premier consumer computing platform. There, Linux (à la Android) is dominant, not Windows, leaving the two camps with little to fight about except royalties.Internet Explorer vs. Netscape (Firefox)Microsoft was at the center of this religious war, too, first beating market-leading Netscape into oblivion with illegal antitrust behavior. The Netscape browser, however, resurrected as Firefox, and this time Firefox seriously cut into Microsoft’s market share, eventually claiming more than 20% of the global desktop browser market, according to Net Applications.Along the way, developers took sides, proclaiming their allegiance in the form of website badges suggesting which browser to use. As for Microsoft, it relaunched its Get the Facts campaign, this time challenging the open-source browsers in the area of security, privacy and more.Over time, this war subsided, despite once being waged in the judicial system and the comments sections of myriads of articles. The desktop became less important, initially establishing Apple as the dominant force in browsers with Google claiming significant share in both desktop and now mobile browser markets.Microsoft Office vs. OpenOfficeAre you noticing a theme here? Yet again, Microsoft is front and center, this time being with its cash-cow Office productivity suite business under siege by the open-source community. Well, sort of. For much of the 2000s, Sun sponsored the vast majority of OpenOffice.org (now OpenOffice) development, and then helped to drive the emergence of the Open Document Format (ODF). While OpenOffice never seriously threatened Microsoft, it did prompt a marketing response.But OpenOffice’s more important legacy, and the one that Microsoft fought more vigorously, was ODF. Across the planet, Microsoft lobbied hard to kill any attempt to institute an open format that would obviate its proprietary Office file formats. It largely succeeded, with adoption for ODF largely stymied.Even so, a larger threat to both ODF and Microsoft has been the emergence of mobile as a primary computing platform. While Microsoft continues to print profits from sales of Office, as the world moves beyond the desktop the need for a full-fledged office productivity suite is fading, whatever the file format. GPL vs. ApacheOf course, Microsoft isn’t the only entity to generate angst and ire in the 2000s. Within the open source camp, the 2000s saw bitter rivalries, including KDE vs. GNOME on the desktop (which neither side won) and free software vs. open source everywhere.The most visible proponent of free software and the GNU General Public License (GPL) that powered it is Richard Stallman. On the more permissive open source side stood Eric Raymond. For a time Stallman and the free source crowd had the upper hand, but over the past few years Apache-style licensing has won out, given the freedom and flexibility it affords developers. This trend accelerated as open source went mainstream, and developers became more concerned with getting work done than scoring political points.Open vs. ClosedThe backdrop for each of these industry flame-fests is the question of open vs. closed technology. Originally confined to a question of licensing, “open” has come to comprise much more, including APIs and data. New breed technology-heavy companies like Facebook espouse openness, arguing that it encourages developer adoption and improves their services. Meanwhile, the closed camp…doesn’t really exist.Oh, sure, there are some who argue that open source is not more secure, or that open data is dangerous, or whatever. But whereas “open vs. closed” was really the fundamental question of the 2000s, it has largely been settled. Today, “openness” is like motherhood and apple pie: everyone loves it, or claims to do so. Today Microsoft openly uses and often advocates open source software. Oracle owns the leading open source relational database, MySQL, and commits significant development resources to advancing it.Which is, perhaps, why today’s big debates are less dominated by quasi-religious overtones. Progress? Yes. But a bit boring?Sadly, yes.Image courtesy of Shutterstock. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Matt Asay A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

Soccer World Mourns Eusebio

first_imgLISBON, Portugal – Tens of thousands of people turned out Jan. 6 to pay tribute to Portuguese football star Eusebio after his coffin was put on public display and taken in a funeral cortege through the streets of Lisbon.People filed out of offices and cafes on a rainy afternoon and applauded as the hearse with a police motorcycle escort passed by. Traffic was halted on the capital’s main roads, and the cortege stopped for a ceremony at city hall.Earlier in the day, dozens of dignitaries and hundreds of fans, some weeping, filed past the coffin at the Lisbon stadium of Benfica, Eusebio’s longtime club. Some 10,000 fans at the Stadium of Light cheered and sang when the coffin was placed in the center of the pitch.The government decreed three days of national mourning after Eusebio’s death Jan. 5 from heart failure. He was 71.Eusebio was an international star and national hero whose heyday was in the 1960s with Benfica and the Portuguese national team. He became one of the world’s top goalscorers and was widely regarded as one of the best players of all time. He was affectionately known as the Black Panther for his athletic physique and agility.The funeral was attended by Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho and many football players, including former world player of the year and retired Portugal captain Luis Figo, as well as Eusebio’s surviving family.Eusebio was to be buried in a cemetery near Benfica’s stadium. Authorities said they would consider moving him later to Lisbon’s National Pantheon, which contains the tombs of illustrious figures from Portuguese history.(Barry Hatton)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more