U.S. solar installations top 2 million mark, capacity hits 70GW

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:The number of solar installations in the United States has officially surpassed 2 million, according to the latest data from Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). The milestone comes just three years after the industry completed its 1 millionth installation, a feat that took 40 years to achieve.Wood Mackenzie analysts expect the U.S. to crack the 3 million mark in 2021 and 4 million in 2023.“The rapid growth in the solar industry has completely reshaped the energy conversation in this country,” said Abigail Ross-Hopper, president and CEO of trade group SEIA. “This $17 billion industry is on track to double again in five years, and we believe that the 2020s will be the decade that solar becomes the dominant new form of energy generation.”California was central to the market’s early years and remains a critical leg today, but its importance is diminishing as other state markets grow up. California accounted for 51 percent of the first million installations but 43 percent of the second million.Success in acquiring more customers, and at lower costs, will determine how quickly the industry installs its next million systems — and at what price. Largely due to the challenges of customer acquisition cost, Wood Mackenzie forecasts residential growth at just 3.3 percent in 2019.The 2 million solar systems currently installed, which represent more than 70 gigawatts of capacity, provide enough electricity for around 12 million homes. But that’s just a fraction of U.S. buildings. According to the Census Bureau, in July 2017 the U.S. had 137.4 million “housing units,” a figure that includes apartments as well as single-family homes, but doesn’t count businesses, manufacturing and other commercial buildings.More: U.S. surpasses 2 million solar installations as industry looks to ‘dominate’ the 2020s U.S. solar installations top 2 million mark, capacity hits 70GWlast_img read more

Khan: I won’t box behind closed doors

first_imgRelatedPosts Italy introduces compulsory virus testing for travellers from France Nigeria records new COVID-19 infections, more deaths as figures rise to 57,242 I was in best of forms before Tokyo Paralympics was postponed — Powerlifter Ejike Former world champion Amir Khan has said he won’t fight behind closed doors should boxing resume during the coronavirus outbreak.British officials are looking at July as a possible return date for bouts, albeit these would take place in the first instance without spectators at venues. “Even though there is big money I wouldn’t be able to do it as I need the fan base there,” British boxer Khan told the BBC on Saturday.“I’ve got three kids. I do so much in the sport already and I feel I’d rather be 100 percent sure before I jump back in,” explained the 33-year-old.Twice a light-welterweight world champion after earning an Olympic silver medal as a teenager, Khan won his last bout with a fourth-round victory over Billy Dib in Saudi Arabia in July to take his professional record to 34 wins from 39 fights.Khan has previously made it clear he wants to end his career with a lucrative bout against ring great Manny Pacquiao or in an all-British contest with Kell Brook — and those fights need a crowd.“I just feel that for a boxer to walk into an arena and walk into a fight having no fans in an empty stadium it’s going to be like walking into a sparring session so I can’t really see that working,” he added. “It’s hard to lift yourself really and get yourself ready for a fight. I can’t see the big names doing that unless there’s ridiculous money from the TV company on the table. You need the audience there to lift your spirits.”Meanwhile Khan questioned whether the health measures proposed by the British Boxing Board of Control for staging bouts amid the pandemic, including the testing of boxers, who would isolate at designated hotels, and officials wearing masks during bouts, would be enough to stop the spread of the virus.He said: “What if someone gets badly injured or catches something from his opponent?”Tags: Amir KhanBBCCoronaviruslast_img read more

Mayweather takes on ‘Ninja Boy’ kickboxer in Japan rumble

first_img0Shares0000Floyd Mayweather (left) and kickboxer Nasukawa (right) are undefeated © AFP / Behrouz MEHRITOKYO, Japan, Dec 31 – US boxing superstar Floyd “Money” Mayweather fights undefeated Japanese kickboxing prodigy Tenshin Nasukawa on Monday, a New Year’s Eve multi-million-dollar rumble outside Tokyo to be held under boxing rules.At 41, Mayweather is more than twice the age of his Japanese opponent, the 20-year-old known as “Ninja Boy” but will carry a more than 4kg (9lb) weight advantage into the ring. The bout in Saitama, north of Tokyo, will be fought over three rounds of three minutes but there are no judges and no winner will be declared unless there is a knockout.The bout will also not count on the record of either fighter — allowing both men to retain their cherished unbeaten records — and is being promoted as a pure exhibition match.It will also be boxing only — putting Nasukawa at a disadvantage, with the kickboxer reportedly liable to a $5 million fine if he aims a kick at Mayweather.The purse has not been officially disclosed but media reports have claimed that Mayweather is making $88 million for the nine minutes of action.At a pre-fight news conference, a relaxed-looking Mayweather said he could complete three rounds “in his sleep”.“It is all about entertainment. I don’t worry about anything,” said Mayweather, a legend in the boxing world who has a perfect 50 in and zero defeats record with 27 knockouts.The relaxed American said he would not be concerned even if he were to be floored by his Japanese opponent.“Me getting knocked out or me getting knocked down … I don’t worry about it at all. If that does happen, I mean that’s entertainment. That’s all we need to see,” said Mayweather.– ‘Gym rat’ –Kickboxer Tenshin Nasukawa was little-known outside Japan before the Mayweather clash was announced © AFP/File / Toshifumi KITAMURAVirtually unknown outside the kickboxing ring in his own country, the bleach-blond Nasukawa from Chiba near Tokyo also boasts an unbeaten record.He won the world junior karate championship, made his professional kickboxing debut at the age of 16 and has a 28-0 record with 21 wins by knockout.Promoters RIZIN have hailed him as “perhaps the best combat sports prospect the country has ever seen” and the 20-year-old himself has claimed he has a “punch that boxers don’t have.”“I want to be the man who changes history. I’ll do that with these fists, with one punch — just watch,” Nasukawa said.Even Mayweather appears impressed, describing his opponent as “an unbelievable talent” and praising his lithe, “gym rat” physique.“He is very young. He is very active… very tough. I had a chance to see some highlights (of his performance) and I was impressed with Tenshin. I was very impressed with him.”Nasukawa has dismissed the idea that the boxing rules will count against him, saying: “All I have to do is to give 100 percent … Since Mayweather is expected to dodge my offence, I really want to hit him.”Nothing to lose: Even if knocked out, the three-round exhibition will not count against Floyd Mayweather’s perfect 50-0 record © AFP/File / Toshifumi KITAMURAThis is the second time Mayweather has been coaxed out of retirement. Last year, he knocked out mixed martial arts fighter Conor McGregor in the 10th round of a super-hyped boxing match.There are also unconfirmed rumours Mayweather could take on reigning UFC lightweight champion Khabib Nurmagomedov, who said last month any match-up would be “twice as interesting” as the McGregor fight.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more