Got E coli ? Outbreak showed danger of raw milk

first_img CDC. Echerichia coli O157:H7 infection associated with drinking raw milk—Washington and Oregon, November-Decmeber 2005. MMWR 2007 Mar 2;56(8):165-7 [Full text] See also: Mar 2, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Federal health officials are using an analysis of an Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak that involved 18 cases in December 2005 to remind people of the dangers of drinking unpasteurized milk. FDA news releasehttp://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01576.html Five patients were hospitalized, and four of them had hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potentially fatal kidney disorder. The hospitalized patients were all children (aged 1 to 13). The FDA statement listed higher numbers, saying the CDC identified 45 outbreaks linked to raw milk or cheese made from raw milk between 1998 and May 2005. Those outbreaks involved 1,007 illnesses, 104 hospitalizations, and 2 deaths. The statement didn’t specify whether this included all pathogens, and FDA officials could not be reached for clarification this afternoon. In a news release yesterday, the Food and Drug Administration said raw milk can be contaminated not only with E coli, but also with Salmonella, Listeria, Campylobacter, and Brucella species. Investigators analyzed the DNA fingerprints of E coli O157:H7 from eight patients and found that seven of them matched one another and also matched isolates from milk samples and environmental samples from the milking-parlor floor, the report says. In addition, there was a dose-response relationship between milk consumption and the risk of illness, with a 37.5% risk for those who drank 3 or more cups daily.center_img By interviewing 43 of 45 families who held shares in the cows, health investigators found 18 cases of E coli infection, 8 of which were laboratory-confirmed, according to the report in today’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Repor (MMWR). The 18 case-patients constituted 13% of the 140 people who reported drinking raw milk from the farm. Raw milk has been banned from interstate commerce since 1987, but it can be sold legally in 27 states. However, “Because raw milk certification has failed to prevent many raw-milk-associated infections in the past, consumers should not assume that certified raw milk is free of pathogens,” the CDC says. The FDA noted that proponents of raw milk claim that it is more nutritious than pasteurized milk and is inherently antimicrobial. “Research has shown that these claims are myths,” the statement said. The MMWR report says 33 outbreaks linked to raw milk, involving E coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Campylobacter, were reported to the CDC from 1988 through 2005. The outbreak was traced to a farm in Cowlitz County, Washington, that ran a cow-share program, in which people bought interests in dairy cows and received raw milk in return, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Raw milk can be sold legally in Washington state under a licensing system, but the farm blamed for the outbreak was not licensed, according to the CDC. Inspectors said they found mud and manure on the floor of the milking area, inadequate handwashing facilities, and improper procedures for cleaning equipment.last_img read more

Researchers find long-lived immunity to 1918 pandemic virus

first_img “The B cells have been waiting for at least 60 years—if not 90 years—for that flu to come around again,” he said. “That’s amazing, because it’s the longest memory anyone’s ever demonstrated.” Determine if the survivors still had antibodies to the virus Aug 17 Vanderbilt University Medical Center press release The group collected blood samples from 32 pandemic survivors aged 91 to 101. The multipronged study had four components, to: The findings appeared online Aug 17 in Nature. Study collaborators hail from several institutions: Vanderbilt University, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Scripps Research Institute. Aug 19, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – A study of the blood of older people who survived the 1918 influenza pandemic reveals that antibodies to the strain have lasted a lifetime and can perhaps be engineered to protect future generations against similar strains. See if the B cells—the ones that produce the antibodies—could be cultured and produce antibodies to a 1918 virus protein Evaluate if the antibodies could protect mice infected with the 1918 influenza virus Dr Tshidi Tsibane, a study author and postdoctoral fellow in Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s microbiology department, said in a press release from Mount Sinai that though there is no need for a new treatment for 1918 influenza virus infections, the results are still useful. The investigators generated B lymphoblastic cell lines from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight subjects. Transformed cells from the blood of 7 of the 8 donors yielded secreting antibodies that bound the 1918 hemagglutinin. From the B cells of three donors, the research group generated five monoclonal antibodies that not only strongly neutralized the 1918 virus, but also cross-reacted with proteins related to the 1930 swine flu virus. However, the antibodies did not react against more contemporary influenza strains. Author James E. Crowe, Jr, MD, professor of pediatrics and director of the Vanderbilt Program in Vaccine Sciences, said in a press release from Vanderbilt that the researchers were surprised by the findings.center_img Attempt fusing cells having the highest levels of activity with myeloma cells to create a hybrid cell line that secretes monoclonal antibodies The people recruited for the study were 2 to 12 years old in 1918 and many recalled sick family members in their households, which suggests they were directly exposed to the virus, the authors report. The group found that 100% of the subjects had serum-neutralizing activity against the 1918 virus and 94% showed serologic reactivity to the 1918 hemagglutinin. Xiaocong Y, Tsibane T, McGraw P, et al. Neutralizing antibodies derived from the B cells of 1918 influenza pandemic survivors. Nature 2008 (published online Aug 17) [Abstract] Aug 17 Mount Sinai School of Medicine press release Inspiration for the study came from an unlikely source, an episode of an old medical television show that portrayed a town protecting itself from the 1918 virus outbreak by using blood from an elderly survivor, the Associated Press (AP) reported yesterday. The storyline prompted Eric Altschuler, MD, a professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at UMDND to ask the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a grant to test people over age 90 for the 1918 flu antibodies, according to the AP report. The NIH funded much of the study and enlisted the expertise of other experts. Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said recent studies have projected that immunity lasts several decades; the current study provides proof, the AP reported. “This is the mother of all immunological memory here,” he told the AP. The authors point out that it is difficult to be certain that the monoclonal antibodies they isolated were first stimulated during the 1918 influenza pandemic. However, they write that the subjects’ clinical histories and the high affinity of the monoclonal antibodies for the 1918 strain “strongly suggest that recent exposures do not account for this immunity.” They add that exposure to similar viruses circulating during first part of the 20th century probably bolstered the subjects’ B cell function. “These findings could serve as potential therapy for another 1918-like virus,” said Dr Tsibane in the statement. In the final arm of the study, the researchers infected mice with the reconstructed 1918 virus and the next day tested the five monoclonal antibodies at various doses to see if the therapy protected the animals. The mice receiving the lowest dose of the 1918 monoclonal antibody died, as did the ones receiving the control antibody. All given the highest antibody doses survived. See also:last_img read more

Choralaires to raise voices for holidays

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREPettersson scores another winner, Canucks beat KingsHardin said two performances will be offered, and that the annual Christmas concert often fills the 400-seat theater. This year’s show will be the second to feature high school singers. Although the group often partners with other quartets, bell ringers and others, they had rarely worked with high schoolers before. “They were very popular last year, so we had them come back,” Hardin said. Sunny Hills High School Vocal Ensemble will sing at the matinee performance, while La Habra High School Chamber Singers will appear in the evening. According to President Norman Bernier, the group has about 60 members, but just 30 will perform for the Christmas concerts. WHITTIER – Whittier residents are receiving an aural Christmas card this year, courtesy of the Choralaires Barbershop Chorus. The group is putting on its annual Christmas concert today in two showings, with the help of local high school vocal groups, members of the Long Beach Chorus and the Young At Heart women’s quartet. The concert, “A Christmas Card from the Choralaires,” is themed with large versions of old-fashioned Christmas cards decorating the Whittier Center Theatre where the performances will take place. “It’s everyone’s favorite songs for Christmas that will put them in the mood, and to hear the four-part harmony is just a delight,” said Dale Hardin, who planned the show’s format. The Choralaires, founded 57 years ago, were once one of the largest barbershop choruses in the country, with more than 200 members. Now, the group is smaller but seasoned, with some members in their 30th or 40th year of participation. The group now gives two or three major concerts a year, and performs at the request of community groups. The Christmas concert, however, it one of the largest undertakings for the group. Practices began three months ago, and sets and props have been constructed for the show. “We’re ready to go,” Hardin said. “We’re going over the set up of the theater and the set up of the lighting, and we’ll be ready to go for the matinee.” Show chair Dick Stemen said the group was worried about construction already under way for renovations at the theater, but he believes that the show will go on. Bernier said the concert will also feature a raffle for a variety of items including tickets to Disneyland and Knott’s Berry Farm, as well as musical theater tickets and access to resorts in Reno. Tickets for the event cost $15 for adults, $6 for students and children under 13. Stemen said the group, made up of volunteer singers, will use proceeds from the raffle and ticket sales to buy music for the chapter and for charity. “That money, we contribute toward the music for the high school and other schools in the area,” Stemen said. The Choralaires perform at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. today at the Whittier Center Theatre, 7630 Washington Ave. To check ticket availability, call (562) 923-5951. airan.scruby@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3029 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more