The Guardian Small British paper makes big impact with NSA stories

first_imgFor a newspaper that’s small and underweight even by British standards, the Guardian has a knack for making some big noises, both in its home market and across the pond.The venerable paper (founded in 1821) was one of five news organizations to publish stories based on WikiLeaks’s trove of leaked U.S. diplomatic cables in late 2010. The only U.S. newspaper to publish the leaks, the New York Times, did so thanks to the generosity of the Guardian, which shared the documents.Next, the Guardian’s revelations about the extent of illegal phone tapping by journalists at Rupert Murdoch’s News of the World in 2011 helped bring down the massively popular British tabloid and led to a wave of criminal prosecutions in Britain.In late May, the Guardian was at it once more. The newspaper raced The Washington Post to break details of a massive National Security Agency surveillance program. It subsequently posted the first and only video interview with Edward Snowden, the young American security contractor who was the source of The Post’s and Guardian’s stories.Not a bad run of scoops for a financially struggling, frankly liberal newspaper with a newsprint circulation of fewer than 160,000 copies daily (which makes it roughly the size of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette) but with a significantly larger digital following worldwide.The NSA stories, in particular, raised the Guardian’s profile to an Everest-like peak. Its video interview with Snowden, conducted by its star U.S. columnist Glenn Greenwald, attracted nearly 7 million unique views worldwide in one day. The total was a record for the paper’s website, which is already one of the world’s most heavily trafficked news sites with a high of 41 million unique monthly visitors.The NSA and WikiLeaks revelations also raise a question: Why is a London-based news organization revealing so many secrets about the United States government?“We’re just doing what journalists do,” replies Alan Rusbridger, the Guardian’s longtime editor and architect of its global digital strategy. “We were contacted, just as The Washington Post was contacted, [by a source] with some very interesting documents. No journalist in the world wouldn’t have been interested in this.”The Guardian, he points out, is equally dogged about domestic spying; it published revelations last month that the British equivalent of the NSA monitored the computers and phone calls of foreign officials during two G-20 summit meetings in London in 2009 — a story that embarrassed the British government on the eve of hosting another international summit.Since 2008, the Guardian has been making a major push to appeal to the U.S. market. After a bout of layoffs, it now employs 29 journalists in the United States, primarily in New York and Washington. Online visitors from the States are channeled to the Guardian’s U.S. edition, which features America-centric news. Monday’s page, for example, carried articles about the deaths of firefighters in Arizona and a retrospective of photos from the Battle of Gettysburg.Along the way, the paper has hired a succession of U.S. pundits such as Murdoch biographer Michael Wolff, NPR host Bob Garfield and former Wonkette blogger Ana Marie Cox.Its biggest hire, arguably, has been Greenwald, the crusading columnist who broke (along with The Washington Post’s Barton Gellman) the NSA surveillance stories.Greenwald joined the Guardian as a regular columnist and blogger last August. He said the decisive factor in his decision to leave Salon.com for the Guardian wasn’t money, but rather the newspaper’s approach to the powerful.“For at least a couple of years before I went there, I found myself citing Guardian articles quite frequently in the work I was doing,” Greenwald said in an exchange of emails from Rio de Janeiro, where he resides with his Brazilian husband. “They were extensively covering vital stories that most U.S. media outlets were either ignoring or downplaying in areas of U.S. foreign policy, civil liberties, secrecy, whistleblowing and the like.” WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds up a copy of Britain’s Guardian newspaper as he addresses media on the grounds of Ellingham Hall in Norfolk, eastern England, on Dec. 17, 2010. Carl Court/AFP In Greenwald’s view, U.S. media outlets “tend to be far more reverent of and accommodating to political power than British media outlets, including the Guardian.”Then again, the Guardian has its own sacred cows. Unlike its U.S. media cousins, which have traditionally sought neutrality in their news reporting, the Guardian hews to the British model of identifying with a political party. The paper has been liberal since its founding by Manchester mill owners and cotton merchants; in the last British elections it supported the minority Liberal Democrats.It has played politics here, too. In 2004, it enlisted its readers to write to undecided voters in Ohio, advising them to vote against President George W. Bush. The campaign elicited a thunderous rebuke from U.S. and British readers alike and was scrapped.Rusbridger explains that some of the Guardian’s willingness to experiment, and much of its independence, is a result of its unusual ownership structure. The newspaper has been owned for decades by a charitable foundation, the Scott Trust Limited, whose “core purpose” is to secure the paper’s editorial independence “in perpetuity.” The trust also owns a sister newspaper, the Observer. (On Sunday, the Observer posted and then quickly withdrew a story that alleged the United States had worked with European Union countries to collect personal communications data; the piece was based solely on information from Wayne Madsen, a U.S. conspiracy theorist who has suggested that President Barack Obama is gay.)For all its nominal success abroad, the Guardian is troubled at home. Circulation of its domestic print edition has tumbled by more than half since the beginning of 2006; according to British media accounts, the paper lost about $1 million a week from 2009 to 2012. It continues to lose money, according to Rusbridger. “We’ve been through lean times like everyone else,” he says. “Last year wasn’t great.”But he notes that the paper is subsidized by other ventures owned by the trust, including Auto Trader, a highly profitable British car-sales site.Rusbridger isn’t blind to the irony. The next round of globe-rattling government-secrecy revelations, he says, may be brought to you by “a secondhand car magazine.”© 2013, The Washington Post Facebook Commentscenter_img No related posts.last_img read more

Go back to the enewsletter Guests at the newly enh

first_imgGo back to the enewsletterGuests at the newly enhanced Four Seasons Resort Nevis in the West Indies have even more reason to book one of the resort’s luxury accommodations with the addition of seven new suites and two new suite categories. As part of the recently completed enhancement project’s first phase, these new suites incorporate modern design elements with a timeless Caribbean feel, offering a spacious place to rest, relax and reconnect.After converting 14 guest rooms, the resort now boasts 24 completely redesigned suites across five new categories: Alexander Suites, Kalinago Suites, Chelanii Suites, Poinciana Suites and Indigo Suites. Named to tell the story of Nevis in different ways, these suites represent aspects of the island’s people, history, nature, wildlife and culture.Alexander SuitesNamed after Nevis’ most famous native son, these contemporary one-bedroom suites are ideal for entertaining with 164 square metres of interior living space. Guests can host family and friends for an intimate dinner or unwind outdoors with a nightcap while enjoying the Caribbean breeze and sweet sounds of Nevis from their expansive patios.Kalinago SuitesAs guests step from the private patio of their 82-square-metre suite directly onto the lawn and down to the sugar-soft sand of Pinney’s Beach, the fresh ocean breeze will envelop them as it did the indigenous Kalinago people of Nevis.Chelanii SuitesJust like the families of sea turtles that nest on Nevis’ shores, guests staying in these spacious suites will relax in complete splendour just steps from the turquoise waters that are sure to captivate them as they surrender to the unspoiled island of Nevis. These suites offer 111 square metres with a separate sitting area and one-and-a-half bathrooms.Poinciana SuitesLike its namesake, the beautiful royal poinciana trees that dot the property and are the national flower of St. Kitts and Nevis, these suites give an elevated perch over the sparkling, sun-kissed Caribbean Sea. Covering 66 square metres, they offer a private escape with a separate room and living space.Indigo SuitesStreaming with natural light and spacious surroundings, these suites provide an extra layer of privacy from the lush flora and fauna of Nevis that once produced an abundance of indigo dye, one of the island’s first cash crops. These suites also offer 66 square metres of interior space.Guests travelling to Nevis in April and May 2019 can enjoy 20% off their stay when booking at least seven days in advance. For reservations, use the chain code FS.Go back to the enewsletterlast_img read more

Study finds sexual problems to be relatively common among middleaged Canadians

first_imgAug 2 2018At least one third of middle-aged Canadians experience sexual problems, according to a new U of G study.Researchers found nearly 40 per cent of women and almost 30 per cent of men between the ages of 40 and 59 face challenges in their sex lives.”This study shows that sexual problems among middle-aged Canadians are relatively common,” said Chris Quinn-Nilas, a PhD candidate in family relations and human development and co-author of the study. “This is significant given this demographic is among the largest in Canada at the moment and research has shown that sexual problems can hinder a person’s overall well-being.”Published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, the study is based on a national survey of 2,400 people who were asked about their sexual health, happiness, and pleasure as well as about sexual behaviours and attitudes.Nearly 40 per cent of women reported their sexual desire was lower than they would have liked over the preceding six months. A significant number of women also reported sexual problems including vaginal dryness (nearly 29 per cent), vaginal pain (17 per cent) and difficulty achieving orgasm (14.5 per cent).About one-third of men reported low sexual desire and about one-quarter said they experienced erectile and ejaculation problems within the preceding six months.The large-scale study, one of the first to capture a national picture of the sex lives of middle-aged Canadians, was a collaboration of researchers from the University of Guelph and the Sex Information and Education Council of Canada with the support of the Reproductive and Sexual Health Division of Church and Dwight Canada, makers of Trojan condoms.One of the factors influencing sexual desire is relationship status, said co-author Prof. Robin Milhausen, Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition.Both men and women, who are married or living with their partner, are more likely to experience lower desire than people who are single, separated, divorced or widowed.Related StoriesNew computational model explores daily pain sensitivity rhythmsOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchStudy estimates health care costs of uncontrolled asthma in the U.S. over next 20 years”There is a feeling of predictability and over-familiarity that comes with long-term relationships that can hinder a person’s level of sexual satisfaction over time,” said Milhausen. “It’s a reminder that the sexual aspects of your relationship are important and contribute to overall relationship health and personal wellbeing. Making an effort, keeping the lines of communication open, and expanding your sexual repertoire can be helpful in keeping the spark alive in long-term relationships.”The study also uncovered a correlation between poor health and low desire and other physical sexual problems.”It makes sense that if someone has arthritis, their desire for sex may be stymied by intense joint pain,” said Quinn-Nilas. “But we also found poor health was related to vaginal dryness for women and erectile difficulties in men, and, on the plus side, there are potential treatments for these sexual problems.”The high rate of sexual problems among middle-aged Canadians highlights the need for doctors to check in with patients about their sexual health, added Quinn-Nilas.A previous study found that doctors rarely ask members of this demographic about their sexual health during routine visits, even though most middle-aged Canadians feel sexual health is a part of health care and that they should be asked, he said.”Assessing sexual health should be a regular part of our health care, especially given the potential impact of sexual problems on overall health and well-being, and the recent advancements in treatments for sexual problems available in Canada that could help improve mid-life Canadians’ level of sexual happiness.”Source: https://news.uoguelph.ca/2018/08/sex-problems-among-middle-aged-canadians-common-u-g-study-reveals/last_img read more