Lady Demons’ Jackson, Clarke Sweep Women’s Indoor Track & Field Honors

first_imgFRISCO, Texas – Northwestern State’s Natashia Jackson and Lauren Clarke are the Southland Conference Women’s Indoor Track & Field Athletes of the Week, the league announced Wednesday.The Lady Demons’ sweep comes after a weekend of competition for Jackson at the Matador Qualifier in Lubbock, Texas, and an appearance by Clarke in the Texas A&M Invitational in College Station, Texas. Jackson blew the competition away with a 53.43 in the 400-meter event, placing her first overall and setting a Southland indoor record along the way. Clarke was not to be outdone as she secured first place in the triple jump with a 42-11.75 (13.10m) and second-place honors in the high jump with a 5-08.75 (1.75m) leap. Both marks serve as personal bests for the sophomore.Women’s Indoor Track Athlete of the Week – Natashia Jackson, Northwestern State – Sr. – Houston, TexasJackson continues to impress as the senior set a Southland 400m record for the second-straight week, knocking .22 off her mark from last week for a 53.43 finish. The Houston, Texas, product erased a .30 deficit at the 200m split in order to take the gold medal in the event by a .34 margin. Jackson’s award marks her second-straight weekly honor and her third of the indoor season.Honorable Mention: Jessica Rabius, Houston Baptist; Hailey Alcorn, Nicholls.Women’s Indoor Field Athlete of the Week – Lauren Clarke, Northwestern State – So. – Houston, TexasClarke established a pair of personal bests at the Texas A&M Invitational, winning the triple jump (13.10m) and finishing second place in the high jump (1.75m) event. The sophomore’s triple jump mark is currently tied for 20th in the nation and stands as the longest jump by a Southland competitor this indoor season. Clarke’s high jump mark ranks tied for fourth in the conference and is tied for 47th nationally.Honorable Mention: Annina Brandenburg, Abilene Christian; Jemira Thomlinson, Houston Baptist; Alanna Arvie, McNeese.Southland weekly award winners are nominated and voted upon by each school’s sports information director. Voting for one’s own athlete is not permitted. To earn honorable mention, a student-athlete must appear on at least 25 percent of ballots.last_img read more

U.S. is often an outlier in global education

first_imgThe United States cut back on education spending after the Great Recession, whereas the government of the United Kingdom poured more money into its schools.Those two contrasting data points are part of a massive new analysis of the state of education around the world by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Released today, the group’s 2014 report, Education at a Glance 2014: OECD Indicators, draws upon student test results, government spending, employment statistics, and other metrics to make the case for what OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría calls “the critical role that education and skills play in fostering social progress.”The United States remains the world leader in overall education spending, although the OECD report suggests that it’s getting a poor return on its investment in terms of what students learn. Even so, spending dropped by 3% in real terms for the 3 years after the global financial meltdown in 2008. Only five other countries chose to go that route. (Italy, Iceland, Hungary, and Estonia recorded double-digit declines, and Russia cut spending by 5%.) The U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) rose by 1% during that period, meaning that 2011 education spending in relation to its GDP was only 96% of what it was in 2008.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) U.S. spending on education headed south after the 2008 crash, a path most countries avoided. Education at a Glance 2014: OECD Indicators center_img In contrast, public spending on education in the United Kingdom rose by 17% after the recession. Combined with a 3% drop in its GDP, the results put U.K. education spending in 2011 at 120% of its 2008 level—by far the strongest showing for any of the 34 countries in the OECD report.The 570-page report covers everything from how many 3-year-olds are attending preschool to how adults without a high school education are faring in the workplace. It’s no surprise that a country’s economic philosophy—be it socialist, free market, state capitalism, or some combination—is often reflected in the findings. Still, the data on education mobility—whether an adult child completed more education than his or her parents did—are sobering.Along with Germany, the United States sits in the bottom tier of countries when it comes to giving the next generation a leg up the skills ladder. Only 30% of U.S. adults no longer in school, and 25% in Germany, have surpassed their parents in the classroom. In Russia, Finland, and Korea, the percentage is nearly 60%. A similar sharp split exists for downward educational mobility: The U.S. and German percentages are nearly 20%, whereas for the other three countries they are less than 10%.last_img read more