POLICE LOG for April 28 Bus Catches On Fire Loose Pit Bull

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights of the Wilmington Police Log for Sunday, April 28, 2019:Police came across a refrigerator wth its doors still on on the curb on Faulkner Avenue. This is a bylaw violation. Police spoke with resident, who agreed to remove the refrigerator’s doors. (9:26am)A caller reported two mountain bikes were found on the side of the road at Elizabeth Drive and Sachem Circle. Bikes belonged to two girls who left them there to walk to Dunkin’ Donuts. (11:50am)A Chestnut Street caller reported a truck drove on his property on Friday and left tire marks. Police responded to view damage. (12:07pm)A bus caught on fire and was evacuated on the 93 North Exit 41 ramp. State Police and Fire Department responded. (1:34pm)Police issued a parking citation for a vehicle parked within 10 feet of a fire hydrant on Lords Court. (2:08pm)An Arlene Avenue caller reported a loose pit bull in her yard. Owner showed up while caller was still on the line. (4:30pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 19: Fist Fight At Planet Fitness; Hawk Stuck Inside Building; Gas Line StruckIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 11: Incidents Not What They Seem; Marijuana Confiscated From Vehicle; Missing Woman FoundIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 31: Woburn Man Arrested For OUI; Bad Highway Crash Required MedflightIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Game of Thrones finale recap Season 8 breaks the wheel

first_imgSansa adorns her mother’s colors and wears the crown of Winterfell as a crowd dubs her the Queen of the North. Arya sets sail to the west of Westeros in a Direwolf-branded ship. Jon is greeted by Tormund Giantsbane at the wall and, putting to rest one of the darkest storylines in TV history, is reunited with Ghost. This is not a drill: Jon is here to murder his Queen and pat his wolf — and he’s all out of Queens to murder.ghostsThe only ending that matters. HBO The first scene of Game of Thrones saw brothers of the Night’s Watch venturing north of the wall, where they were murdered by White Walkers. The last ever shot of Game of Thrones was Jon, along with a squad of wildlings, riding north of Castle Black into those same woods.Were you satisfied by the conclusion? If not, don’t fret. George RR Martin should have the final books completed in the next two or three… decades.  Game of Thrones season 8 finale: Our watch has ended Most heartbreaking Game of Thrones deaths 6:00 Sansa asks where Jon is. Grey Worm says Jon must pay for his crimes, and he’s pretty keen to execute Tyrion as well. What happens to Jon and Tyrion is up to the King or Queen, they decide, but there is no King or Queen. Welp, all of Westeros’ lords are here, so Tyrion asks why they don’t just talk among themselves and pick a ruler? The supremely mediocre Edmure stands and starts listing his credentials, but his niece Sansa tells him to sit down. Sansa is great, and in a just world would be the one to hop, hop, hop onto the throne. Samwell suggests the people of Westeros vote, but he’s quickly laughed out of the discussion. What unites people? Tyrion poses that question to the bunch. Yeah, armies, gold and flags are cool, but have you tried stories? As he soliloquizes about tales and common folk or whatever, the camera pans around the group. You can bet whoever it stops on will be the new Lord of the Seven Kingdoms. (I had my fingers crossed for Sansa who, as mentioned, is great.)Who has a better story, Tyrion asks, than Bran Stark?lolgreysA new era.  HBO Bran was pushed out of the top story of a tower and lived. He was paralyzed, but learned to fly. He went beyond the wall and became the Three Eyed Raven. Now, he knows all the stories of man. He’s perfect.Tyrion asks Bran to consider it. “Why do you think I came all this way?” Bran says with all the warmth and excitement we’ve come to love him for. The Lords and Ladies all vote for Bran Stark — except for Sansa. She loves him, but the North will remain an independent Kingdom, she proclaims. No Stark knees will be bent today. Bran agrees, making his first act as ruler one of naked nepotism. It’s agreed. Bran Stark is now Brandon the Broken, Lord of the Six Kingdoms and Protector of the Realm. I watched this episode with five people and it was around this time that I heard all of their hearts breaking in quick succession. It was a symphony of cardiovascular failure. I don’t imagine this will go over well with the “remake this season” crowd, but hey, we’ve had worse Kings. Bran can have no children, and so his Rule cannot be passed down. Tyrion tells Grey Worm that this is the wheel-breaker that their Queen would have wanted. Bran’s second order of business is to make Tyrion his Hand. Tyrion says he doesn’t deserve it, that he’s not as wise as he thought he was. (Nice to hear him admit this, because he sure has been a chump this whole season.) Bran says Tyrion doesn’t want to be Hand, but he doesn’t want to be King, so it’s a perfect combination. Grey Worm is furious and demands justice.”He just got it,” Bran decrees. “He’s made many terrible mistakes. He’s going to spend the rest of his life fixing them.” game-of-thrones-season-8-episode-6-arya-bran-sansaEnlarge ImageKing Stark.  Helen Sloan/HBO A Dream of SpringAfter the scene in which Bran the Broken is anointed, Tyrion, now the Hand, goes to see Jon, now the prisoner. I couldn’t help but think their dialogue was directed at the audience as much as it was to progress the story. Jon learns that he’s being sent to The Wall to take the black. In the absence of Wildlings and White Walkers, the Night’s Watch is now a home for “bastards and broken men.” The Unsullied wanted him dead, while Arya and Sansa wanted him to walk free.”No one is very happy, which means it’s a good compromise I suppose,” Tyrion says. This line reminded me of Inglorious Basterds, which ends with Quentin Tarantino, through Brad Pitt’s character, telling the audience: “This might be my masterpiece.” The next exchange between Tyrion and Jon struck me as showrunners D.B Weiss and David Benioff talking directly to their audience, elements of which have become hostile to them..Jon: “Was it right? What I did?”Tyrion: “What we did.”Jon: “It didn’t feel right.”Tyrion: “Ask me in 10 years.” From here the remainder of the episode was like an extended credits scene where we got to see the characters’ happily-ever-after moments.oldmatessssThe new Small Council.  HBO Jon says his farewells to the Starks. He tells Sansa that the people of Winterfell could have no better ruler than Ned Stark’s daughter. He tells Arya to visit him at the Wall. She says she won’t — because she’s sailing “west of Westeros,” where the Known World ends. Jon apologizes to Bran for not being there for him in his time of need. “You were exactly where you were supposed to be,” Bran says. Classic Bran.We then see Ser Brienne reading The Book of Brothers, in which the deeds of the great Kingsguard knights are recorded. Jaime was thoroughly owned by Joffrey back in season 4 for his sparse entry in the book, but Ser Brienne sees to it that Jaime’s deeds were known. She records his exploits over the years, and ends it with: “Died protecting his Queen.”Next up is a small council meeting, headed by Tyrion. It starts with Grand Maester Samwell presenting Tyrion with a tome, a written history of The Great War and The Last War. The name of this tome? A Song of Fire and Ice. Bronn, who just two episodes ago had threatened Tyrion with death, is now Master of Coin. Ser Davos is Master of Ships. They, along with Ser Brienne and Ser Podrick, talk about rebuilding the city and quarrel over whether they should prioritize ships or brothels. Maybe we don’t deserve peace after all.The show closes as we follow the Stark kids to their new adventures.  Originally published May 19.  See all the Game of Thrones season 8 photos Now playing: Watch this: 6:42 Enlarge ImageWatch the Throne.Sunday’s Game of Thrones finale, arguably the biggest moment in episodic TV this century, is over. After eight years, eight seasons and several dozens of hours, the epic-fantasy drama is behind us.Season 8 has been controversial, and is perhaps encapsulated best by last week’s episode, The Bells. It ended many of Game of Thrones’ longest running and most important plots, including the deaths of Cersei and Jaime Lannister as well as Daenerys Targaryen’s descent into Mad Queendom. But it also sparked a backlash, which led to more than a million fans signing a petition to have the season remade. So not only does the finale have to end one of TV’s most historic shows, it also has to jiu-jitsu bitter fans into feeling satisfied. OK, let’s do this. For the final time, you are now watching the throne. (For the final time until the prequel, that is.) Here’s your official warning: The full recap below features spoilers. The Dragon and the LionThe roughly 90-minute episode was split into two parts. The climax of part one was the death of Daenerys Targaryen at the hands of Jon Snow. Episode 6, titled The Iron Throne, started with Tyrion and Jon walking through a destroyed King’s Landing, the streets of which were decorated by burned and bloodied bodies. They’re not stoked by what they see. They split up, with Tyrion venturing into the Red Keep dungeons, where he finds Cersei and Jaime. He crumbles with grief over the bodies of his siblings, who were killed by a different type of crumbling.Jaime and Cersei died with surprisingly little ceremony last week, but Tyrion’s weeping gave their endings a little extra gravitas. Jon chances upon Grey Worm and his squad of Unsullied executing Lannister soldiers. The war is won, Jon says, and there’s no reason to kill these men. Grey Worm, who now wears a permanent scowl and is extremely hateable, says he’s acting on the orders of the Queen. The two get into a testosterone-fueled confrontation before Jon decides he needs to speak to Daenerys.Before either Tyrion or Jon can make their way to Daenerys, who’s fresh off her descent into villainy, she gives a victory speech to her forces by the steps of the Keep. Jon and Tyrion stand behind her. Somebody please cue the ominous music.game-of-thrones-season-8-episode-6-dany-unsulliedEnlarge ImageSweet… victory? HBO “War is not over until we liberate the world,” she announces in eastern tongue, “from Winterfell to Dorne.” That last line is Jon’s first clue that there’s something not quite right about this new Dany. She proceeds to make Grey Worm her Master of War. I cannot stress how punchable Grey Worm has become. The crowd of Unsullied and Dothraki cheer. Tyrion approaches Daenerys, and she accuses him of freeing Jaime.”I freed my brother and you slaughtered a city,” he replies. He takes off his Hand of the King badge and throws it to the ground. You may recall the first “take off my badge and throw it away” move was pulled by Ned Stark in season 1, protesting King Robert’s demand that an innocent Daenerys, then in Essos with no army nor dragons, be killed. Daenerys, who used her army and dragon to pillage the city, demands he be taken away. Circles man, it’s all about the circles. TV and Movies Jon walks over to the Red Keep to see Daenerys. Drogon is standing guard. Drogon eyes down Jon, but decides he’s cool. Daenerys, in a scene almost identical to her Qarth vision in season 2, surveys the Red Keep. She grabs hold of one of the Iron Throne’s swords. Jon approaches.Jon pleads with her to pardon Tyrion. She says she can’t. “We can’t hide behind small mercies,” she says. This is a different Dany from last episode; she’s assured of her actions, but not in a crazy way. Jon says they’re trying to build a world of mercy. Trust me, Daenerys reckons, she knows what is good. They embrace. She tells him they’ll break the wheel together.”You are my queen, now and forever,” he whispers solemnly. They kiss — and Jon stabs her. With a dagger. To her heart. Which she needed to live. This was actually a deeply affecting scene. Though she refused to free Tyrion, Daenerys showed off her warmer side as she tried to bask in victory alongside Jon. This made her petrified rictus of betrayal all the more poignant. Jon, crying, lays her down. Our last vision of Daenerys is the grieving look she gives her most trusted ally.  Daenerys’ death roused more than my feeble emotions, as it also awoke Drogon. He flies into the Keep, surveys the scene and gets his dragonbreath ready. Jon prepares for his second death, but Drogon doesn’t burn him. Instead he melts the Iron Throne. Drogon picks Daenerys up with his claws and flees.Game over. Enlarge ImageDrogon breaks the wheel. HBO Brandon the BrokenThe second part of the episode was essentially epilogue, and takes place weeks after Daenerys’ death. It begins with Grey Worm leading Tyrion to King’s Landing’s Dragonpit, where Jon and Co. brought the White Walker to Cersei in season 7. There we see a gathering of Westeros’ great lords: Bran, Arya and Sansa Stark are all there. Samwell Tarly is there. Robin Arryn and Yohn Royce of the Vale are there. Ser Davos Seaworth and Ser Brienne too.We even reunite with Ser Edmure Tully, (Catelyn Stark’s brother) who was taken hostage and used as a Lannister pawn after his infamously crimson wedding ceremony back season 3. All the faces you know and love. Burning questions we still have about Game of Thrones 42 Photos Lots more on the GoT finale Where did every character end up? Twitter reacts to *that* death in episode 6 Season 8 finale left plastic water bottles in shot What did Brienne really write about Jaime? Some ideas Now playing: Watch this: Jon goes to see him. (This is an insular, linear episode, with one scene following the story of the previous one, which is strange for Game of Thrones.) Jon, who is now absolutely incapable of reading a person, is still on Team Daenerys. Her best friend and her dragon both got killed, he says. How could she not be a little fiery?”You love her,” Tyrion says. “I love her too… not as successfully as you.” I guess that explains that scene in season 7 when Tyrion looks on with tremendous thirst as Jon enters Daenerys’ cabin. (That’s not a gross euphemism, they were on a ship!)  187 Photos “Love is the death of duty,” Jon says, a callback to his great-great uncle, Maester Aemon, who said that to him in season 1 after Jon’s not father, Ned Stark, was executed. “Sometimes duty is the death of love,” Tyrion retorts. “You are the shield who guards the realms of man.”Tyrion is asking Jon to kill Daenerys, but Jon won’t have it. Tyrion asks what Daenerys will do to Jon, the rightful heir to the throne, and his sisters, who know he’s the rightful heir. Sansa will never bend the knee, he warns. “She doesn’t get to choose,” Jon says. “No, but you do,” Tyrion exclaims, “and you have to choose now.”People love talking smack about Game of Thrones, but this was an A+ scene. HBO, if you end up remaking the season, please leave this scene in. Game of Thrones 22 Share your voice Comments 57 Photos Tags Game of Thrones stars, from season 1 through todaylast_img read more

Someone New Wants to Chat With You Your Refrigerator

first_img Who among us hasn’t shouted at an ornery inanimate object in the privacy of our home? Well, thanks to LG, now some of those objects might just talk back. The South Korea-based electronics giant announced today they are rolling out a new line of smart refrigerators, ovens and washing machines that promise to make consumers lives even more interconnected.Related: Samsung’s Gesture-Operated TVs May Soon Switch On Your Living Room LightsThe products are the first to utilize the company’s HomeChat service. Through social messaging app Line, a popular WhatsApp and Viber competitor with some 400 million users, LG customers can remotely operate and get information from their appliances when they aren’t at home.The company likens connecting with the smart appliances to “chatting with a close friend,” and while you wouldn’t necessarily go that far, the smart refrigerator does feature an internal camera (that takes pictures in case you forget your shopping list) and a “freshness tracker” that tells you when something is expired, while the smart oven can recommend new recipes.Related: Get This: A Smart Toilet That Aims to Correct Poor Posture, and Even Detect Pregnancy and Disease Depending on your perspective, the prospect of a totally outfitted home may seem cool or creepy, but it is a bit concerning nonetheless, especially when as recently as January, smart refrigerators were part of the cause of sizable hack attack. With more connection comes the necessity for increased security. But the “Internet of Things” marches on — the LG appliances are currently only available for purchase in Korea, with the company aiming to expand to other markets like the U.S. at a later date. Related: 8 Ways the ‘Internet of Things’ Will Impact Your Everyday Life Register Now » 2 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globalcenter_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. May 7, 2014last_img read more

3 Ways You Can Avoid Wasting Your Companys Money on Technology

first_imgMarch 11, 2019 5 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Business-tech adoption continues to grow globally. Worldwide, according to a Gartner forecast, IT spending is expected to reach $3.8 trillion by 2019, driven by investments in enterprise software and IT services.Related: 3 Tech Strategies You Can Use to Earn and Save More MoneyThat’s good for the companies making the tech, but perhaps less so for the companies buying it. Reason: With software and hardware becoming increasingly affordable, it’s easy to make rash spending decisions to purchase devices or subscribe to services that promise productivity gains and benefits. Any of those purchases may fail to deliver.So, as an owner, you need to exercise caution, because building your company’s tech infrastructure in a slapdash manner can be a financial sinkhole. The last thing you need for your fledgling venture is a runaway IT budget.Want to avoid wasting money when it comes to technology? Here are three ways to do that:1. Streamline Saas subscriptions.Netskope’s data indicates that enterprise companies often run up to 1,200 cloud services and software-as-a-service (SaaS) products.  Out of those 1,200 cloud services, the most highly used are HR and marketing apps, which respectively average 139 tools for HR and 121 for marketing apps apiece.Given this rate of adoption, it’s common for teams to subscribe to multiple applications twith similar features and overlapping functionalities. Marketing apps, for instance, might all feature some form of analytics and tracking, automation and communication capabilities. To prevent such redundancy, it’s important that companies track their SaaS subscriptions.”Keeping SaaS cost under control is a challenging task when SaaS spend is spread among different business units,” Uri Nativ, co-founder and VP of engineering at Torii, wrote on his company’s blog. “When visibility is low, the spend control is low, which quickly leads to wasted money.”A SaaS spend dashboard has to be presented to IT and your business units in readable way,” Nativ added. “Once the various business units have good visibility on cost, they can control it, save money and reduce waste.”2. Avoid cheap devices from dubious manufacturers.Another area where you may be spending unreasonably is hardware. The electronics manufacturing boom has fed an influx of cheap computing devices into the market. Due to their low prices, you may be tempted to experiment with off-brand PCs, tablets or even internet of things (IoT) devices, like smart thermostats for your workplace.However, many of these devices are sold cheaply because manufacturers cut certain corners on durability and performance. Some cheap devices may even expose you to data breaches. Additionally, issues that arise from shoddy production can become costly to deal with, especially if they result in information loss or down time.As cybersecurity expert Brian Krebs has advised on his blog, “Bear in mind that when it comes to IoT devices, cheaper usually is not better.”There is no direct correlation,” Krebs added, “between price and security, but history has shown the devices that tend to be toward the lower end of the price ranges for their class tend to have the most vulnerabilities and backdoors, with the least amount of vendor upkeep or support.”3. Adopt only mature and proven technologies.For smaller ventures, being an early adopter can be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, you may be able to leverage new technologies and turn them into your competitive advantage. On the other hand, new technologies take time to mature and offer only spotty reliability and poor user experiences. Emerging technologies also commonly fizzle out.Related: How Start-ups are Using Tech to Help SMEs save MoneyTake the case of cryptocurrencies. While they may have enjoyed massive buzz a year ago, users now struggle to find practical uses for many of the tokens in circulation. In late 2017, at the height of the crypto-hype cycle, even small businesses began to invest in these currencies and support them as payment methods. While that action might ultimately be the right move, we’re not there yet: Today, the infrastructure and climate simply aren’t ready yet.As economist Nouriel Roubini has noted, even Bitcoin, the most mainstream cryptocurrency, has serious limitations. “With Bitcoin, you can do five transactions per second; with Visa, you can do 25,000 transactions per second,” Roubini said in an interview with Cointelegraph. “It’s not scalable, it’s not secure, it’s not decentralized. So, what is it worth?”While this doesn’t mean that cryptocurrencies will never find their place in the business ecosystem, companies that were early adopters may now have to re-evaluate whether providing continued support for crypto payments will be worth the costs they’ve incurred.Smart spending countsConventional financial wisdom dictates that just because something is cheap or readily available doesn’t mean that you ought to buy it. The same is true for IT spending.Align your tech adoption with your business goals. That way, you’ll be able to identify which technologies fit your situation best, so that you can make smart purchasing decisions. A streamlined and secure infrastructure should help you get the most benefits with the least expense. You have to carefully evaluate your IT strategy and invest only in technologies that have the most potential to provide real value to your business in the immediate future.Related: Upgrading Your IT EquipmentGiven the competition that businesses face, making sure every penny creates value for your company could be the positive impact your bottom line needs. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

Stack Overflow survey data further confirms Pythons popularity as it moves above

first_imgThis year’s Stack Overflow Developer Survey results provided a useful insight into how the programming language ecosystem is evolving. Perhaps the most remarkable – if unsurprising – insight was the continued and irresistible rise of Python. This year, for the first time, it finished higher in the rankings than Java. We probably don’t need another sign that Python is taking over the world, but this is certainly another one to add to the collection. What we already know about Python’s popularity as a programming language Okay, so the Stack overflow survey results weren’t that surprising because Python’s growth is well-documented. The language has been shooting up the TIOBE rankings, coming third for the first time back in September 2018. The most recent ranking has seen it slip to fourth ( C++ is making a resurgence – but that’s a story for another time…), but it isn’t in decline – it’s still growing. In fact, despite moving back into fourth, it’s still growing at the fastest rate of any programming language, with 2.36% growth in its rating. For comparison, C++’s rate of growth in the rankings is 1.62%. But it’s not just about TIOBE rankings. Even back in September 2017 the Stack Overflow team were well aware of Python’s particularly astonishing growth in high-income countries. Read next: 8 programming languages to learn in 2019 Python’s growth in the Stack Overflow survey since 2013 It has been pretty easy to trace the growth in the use of Python through the results of every recent Stack Overflow survey. From 2016, it has consistently been on the up: 2013: 21.9% (6th position in the rankings) 2014: 23.4% (again, 6th position in the rankings) 2015: 23.8% (6th) 2016: 24.9% (6th) 2017: 32% (moving up to 5th…) 2018: 38.8% (down to 7th but with a big percentage increase) 2019: 41.7% (4th position) But more interestingly, it would seem that this growth in usage has been driving demand for it. Let’s take a look at how things have changed in the ‘most wanted’ programming language since 2015 – this is the “percentage of developers who are not developing with the language or technology but have expressed interest in developing with it:” 2015: 14.8% (3rd) 2016: 13.3% (4th) 2017: 20.6% (1st) 2018: 25.1% (1st) 2019: 25.7% (1st) Alongside that, it’s also worth considering just how well-loved Python is. A big part of this is probably the fact that Python is so effective for the people using it, and helps them solve the problems they want to solve. Those percentages are growing, even though it didn’t take top position this year (this is described by Stack Overflow as the “percentage of developers who are developing with the language or technology and have expressed interest in continuing to develop with it”): 2015: 66.6% (10th position) 2016: 62.5% (9th) 2017: 62.7% (6th) 2018: 68% (3rd) 2019: 73.1% (2nd, this time pipped by Rust to the top spot) What’s clear here is that Python has a really strong foothold both in the developer mind share (ie. developers believe it’s something worth learning) and in terms of literal language use. Obviously, it’s highly likely that both things are related – but whatever the reality, it’s good to see that process happening in data from the last half a decade. Read next: 5 blog posts that could make you a better Python programmer What’s driving the popularity of Python? The obvious question, then, is why Python is growing so quickly. There are plenty of theories out there, and there are certainly plenty of blog posts on the topic. But ultimately, Python’s popularity boils down to a few key things. Python is a flexible language One of the key reasons for Python’s growth is its flexibility. It isn’t confined to a specific domain. This would go some way of explaining its growth – because it’s not limited to a specific job role or task, a huge range of developers are finding uses for it. This has a knock on effect – because the community of users continues to grow, there is much more impetus on developing tools that can support and facilitate the use of Python in diverse domains. Indeed, with the exception of JavaScript, Python is a language that many  developers experience through its huge range of related tools and libraries. The growth of data science and machine learning While Python isn’t limited to a specific domain, the immense rise in interest in machine learning and data analytics has been integral to Python’s popularity. With so much data available to organizations and their employees, Python is a language that allows them to actually leverage it. Read next: Why is Python so good for AI and Machine Learning? 5 Python Experts Explain Python’s easy to learn The final key driver of Python’s growth is the fact that it is relatively easy to learn. It’s actually a pretty good place to begin if you’re new to programming. Going back to the first point, it’s precisely because it’s flexible that people that might not typically write code or see themselves as developers could see Python as a neat solution to a problem they’re trying to solve. Because it’s not a particularly steep learning curve, it introduces these people to the foundational elements of programming. Something which can only be a good thing, right? The future of Python It’s easy to get excited about Python’s growth, but what’s particularly intriguing about it is what it can indicate about the wider software landscape. That’s perhaps a whole new question, but from a burgeoning army of non-developer professionals powered by Python to every engineer wanting to unlock automation, it would appear that the growth of Python both a response and a symptom of significant changes.last_img read more