US Mobile Ad Spending Tops 4B in 2012

first_imgThe effectiveness of mobile advertising is still being debated, but media buyers are already going all-in while also increasing their presence on the Web.Mobile ad spending grew 180 percent to top $4 billion in 2012, according to the latest estimates from digital marketing research firm eMarketer. At the same time, the Interactive Advertising Bureau and PwC US report Internet ad revenues totaled $9.3 billion for the third quarter.See Also: AAM Data: Mobile and Digital Monetization Expected to Rise On the mobile side, eMarketer highlights this year’s exponential growth as an outlier–the expected growth rate for 2013 is a comparatively meager 77 percent, and it slows from there–but predicts the market will surpass $20 billion by 2016.Google is still the mobile-ad king with more than $2.1 billion in revenue and 57 percent market share, but others are closing the gap.Facebook–who only began offering mobile-specific advertising via “Sponsored Stories” mid-way through this year–was the second-largest seller with an expected haul of $339 million for 2012. Mobile earnings estimates for the social giant were as low as $45 million earlier this year. Facebook had no reported mobile ad earnings in 2011.Twitter, also showing no mobile ad revenue in 2011, was this year’s fourth-largest earner with $135 million.Internet Ad Revenues Grow 18 Percent in Q3While mobile was exploding, Internet ad spending continued its steady climb through the third quarter.The sector grew 18 percent year-over-year and 6 percent from the second quarter to reach $9.3 billion.”Sustained growth in internet ad revenue despite economic head winds is a testament to the value marketers get from using digital media,” says Sherrill Mane, SVP of research, analytics and measurement for IAB, in a statement. To stay updated on the latest FOLIO: news, become a Facebook fan and follow us on Twitter!last_img read more

Startup Playi using friendly robots to teach kids computer programming

first_img(Phys.org) —Startup Play-i has created a crowd-sourcing campaign to gather funds for building and selling its pair of robots called Bo and Yana—both are part of an overall toy design to teach children as young as five years old, to program a computer. The idea, the team says, is to get children interested in programming by making it a part of storytelling. Citation: Startup “Play-i” using friendly robots to teach kids computer programming (2013, October 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-startup-play-i-friendly-robots-kids.html More information: www.play-i.com/ The two robots look and behave differently. Yana has three wheels and can roll around, it can also play its little xylophone if programmed to do so. Yana, which the creative team behind the robots calls the storyteller, is able to make different recognizable sounds on demand.The team behind Play-i is a collection of people who used to work for big tech companies such as Google, Apple and Frog Design. They started their company with the idea that children are capable of learning sophisticated concepts if they are presented in the right way. Bo and Yana are programmed using kid-friendly icons on a smartphone or tablet (since the operating system is iOS, that means iPhone and iPad, at least for now). To get either of the robots to do something, children develop a story around what it is they want done, then use the icons to develop the story, which results in the robots carrying out actions that follow what they’ve described. One example would be having Bo retrieve a flower from another robot, or a person, then carry it to someone else for presentation. Yana on the other hand can be taught to emit a sound like a helicopter if someone touches it. The concept is simple, by breaking down something that seems complex into something that is actually small parts of a story, children can develop more complex programs.The Play-i team is also looking to the future with their robots—code that is created from the icons is displayed on the tablet screen so that the child can see what they have wrought—as they grow older they can progress to writing code directly, giving them even more control over their toys.The crowd-funding campaign has a goal of collecting $250,000, if that number is reached, Play-i says the robots will be available for purchase by this summer, likely priced at $199 and $69 for Bo and Yana respectively. Explore furthercenter_img © 2013 Phys.org Dash Robotics crowdfunding ‘origami’ runner you can assemble at home This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more