Someone New Wants to Chat With You Your Refrigerator

first_img Who among us hasn’t shouted at an ornery inanimate object in the privacy of our home? Well, thanks to LG, now some of those objects might just talk back. The South Korea-based electronics giant announced today they are rolling out a new line of smart refrigerators, ovens and washing machines that promise to make consumers lives even more interconnected.Related: Samsung’s Gesture-Operated TVs May Soon Switch On Your Living Room LightsThe products are the first to utilize the company’s HomeChat service. Through social messaging app Line, a popular WhatsApp and Viber competitor with some 400 million users, LG customers can remotely operate and get information from their appliances when they aren’t at home.The company likens connecting with the smart appliances to “chatting with a close friend,” and while you wouldn’t necessarily go that far, the smart refrigerator does feature an internal camera (that takes pictures in case you forget your shopping list) and a “freshness tracker” that tells you when something is expired, while the smart oven can recommend new recipes.Related: Get This: A Smart Toilet That Aims to Correct Poor Posture, and Even Detect Pregnancy and Disease Depending on your perspective, the prospect of a totally outfitted home may seem cool or creepy, but it is a bit concerning nonetheless, especially when as recently as January, smart refrigerators were part of the cause of sizable hack attack. With more connection comes the necessity for increased security. But the “Internet of Things” marches on — the LG appliances are currently only available for purchase in Korea, with the company aiming to expand to other markets like the U.S. at a later date. Related: 8 Ways the ‘Internet of Things’ Will Impact Your Everyday Life Register Now » 2 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globalcenter_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. May 7, 2014last_img read more

Mobile Sharing Economy Internet of Things the Coming Economic Boom

first_img The rise of the sharing economy over the past few years has shifted mindsets and traditional business models. Consumers are much more open to renting items and services from individuals instead of established businesses and organizations. This is shaking up engrained business models and allowing for new possibilities in the global marketplace. The peer-to-peer sharing models, like Spinlister (where I work) and Lyft, offer new and unique options for transportation at your fingertips.Related: 8 Ways the ‘Internet of Things’ Will Impact Your Everyday LifeSharing has gone mobile. A decade ago the sharing economy was fragmented and limited in its practical use. First, people had to accept the idea of sharing. People had to be willing to trust the community and take a risk on another person actually delivering that good or service.Second, when people began sharing they were unable to do so on a global level. That made it difficult to sustain any real income. Before mobile devices were widely available, sharing was limited to informal personal networks or websites offering limited services via the Internet. AirBNB probably would have succeeded regardless of mobile technology, but what about the other major players that help drive the sharing economy as a whole?Advances in mobile technology have propelled an entirely new marketplace with people sharing everything. More importantly, it has made the fulfillment of immediate or impulsive needs possible and convenient. It helps complete transactions that start online, coordinate multiple parties and make the entire experience frictionless.Sharing would struggle if it weren’t convenient and it would never be convenient without mobile technology. People are constantly on the go and busy. If an item they’re trying to share is on their person, they need a way to update the location of those goods to be truly useful and frictionless for both sides. Mobile technologies have opened the doors for people to effortlessly share goods and make money.The realization that idle goods can generate significant income, and mobile technology makes sharing those goods easy, has transformed the sharing economy into a multi-billion dollar industry. A recent internal study commissioned by us at Spinlister found that only 4 percent of Americans have used AirBNB or Uber. Imagine how big the sharing economy will be once it hits 20, 30, 40, or 50 percent saturation.Related: The Internet of Things May See Huge Growth, So Companies Want in NowSharing in an interconnected era. I was recently discussing a concept called The Internet of Things (IoT) with a brilliant young engineer working within an exclusive technology development department at a major electronics company. There is a race to develop hard goods that both serve a function and connect directly to the Internet, other goods and devices. That information can be relayed into third party applications.For Instance, imagine you need a eight-foot step ladder. With IoT, you could locate the ladder nearest to you. Add that data to a sharing economy platform and you could share almost every object you own! This is an extreme example but it illustrates how mobilization technology will expand the sharing economy in the future.While practical use of this technology is likely five to 10 years out for major product lines, I expect  these applications will trickle down to everyday goods over the next decade or two. Within that time frame I also expect the sharing economy to mature, more major players will emerge and a critical mass of people will regularly use a sharing economy platform.Once IoT is added into the equation, people will start thinking of mobility in terms outside of their mobile phones. This “mobility of things” will open the door to the sharing of almost everything you can think of. It will be easy, fluid, cheap and revenue generating.The sharing economy movement is the gold rush of our generation. The advances in mobile technology will strengthen the marketplace while making it easier and more convenient for all parties involved to participate.Related: What’s the Right Path for Startups Entering the ‘Internet of Things’? 4 min read September 22, 2014 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now »last_img read more

Google Pulls the Plug on Helpouts

first_imgFebruary 16, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 2 min read Register Now »center_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Say sayonara to Helpouts, Google’s live video-discussion tool. The tech giant is pulling the plug on Helpouts on April 20.Google launched Helpouts in 2013 as a way for entrepreneurs and topic experts to share information and connect with customers online. A sort of cross between YouTube and Google Hangouts, the tool allowed people to host or attend live video demonstrations and conversations, where experts could provide one-on-one advice in real time.Related: Google Is Giving Away 2GB of Permanent Storage to Users Who Perform Security ChecksUnlike Hangouts, business owners and experts who used Helpouts were able to charge a fee for each video session, with Google taking a percentage of that, of course. “The Helpouts community includes some engaged and loyal contributors, but unfortunately, it hasn’t grown at the pace we had expected,” Google said in a post announcing the shutdown. No word on exactly how many experts were utilizing Helpouts or on how many people in general were on the platform. A Google spokesperson did not immediately return an email seeking comment.Google says people will be able to use Google Takeout to download their Helpouts history between April 20 and November 1.Related: 26 Little-Known Facts About Google (Infographic)last_img read more