Harry Potter Game Launch Date Set With Maggie Smith Other Actors Lending

first_imgDame Maggie Smith and other actors from Warner Bros.’ Harry Potter films will be giving voice to characters in the new “Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery” role-playing game, which is officially slated to launch April 25.In the game, players create a personalized student avatar to experience life as a student at the famed Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. It’s set in the 1980s, before Harry Potter’s birth.Smith, who played Prof. McGonagall in WB’s big-screen adaptations of J.K. Rowling’s best-selling books, said, “If I could attend Hogwarts as a student, I would be most excited to attend the potions class taught by Severus because it is the most exotic.”In addition to Smith, actors from the Harry Potter films providing voiceovers for Jam City’s “Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery” are: Michael Gambon (Prof. Dumbledore), Warwick Davis (Prof. Flitwick), Sally Mortemore (Madam Irma Pince), Gemma Jones (Madam Pomfrey) and Zoe Wanamaker (Madam Hooch). Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15center_img The free-to-play mobile game is developed by L.A. games studio Jam City in partnership with Portkey Games, Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment’s game label dedicated to Rowling’s Wizarding World.“Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery” players join one of the four Hogwarts Houses before progressing through their years at Hogwarts, participating in magical classes and activities such as Potions and Transfiguration. As players improve their skills, they unlock new locations, spells and other magical abilities — and their decisions affect their character’s story arc and how other characters interact with them.The game will be available for mobile devices via Apple’s App Store, Google Play, and the Amazon Appstore. More info is available on HarryPotterHogwartsMystery.com as well as on the game’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.Separately, WB’s Portkey Games also will be publishing the forthcoming “Harry Potter: Wizards Unite” augmented-reality game being developed by Niantic Labs (the company behind “Pokemon Go”).last_img read more

Startup Playi using friendly robots to teach kids computer programming

first_img(Phys.org) —Startup Play-i has created a crowd-sourcing campaign to gather funds for building and selling its pair of robots called Bo and Yana—both are part of an overall toy design to teach children as young as five years old, to program a computer. The idea, the team says, is to get children interested in programming by making it a part of storytelling. Citation: Startup “Play-i” using friendly robots to teach kids computer programming (2013, October 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-startup-play-i-friendly-robots-kids.html More information: www.play-i.com/ The two robots look and behave differently. Yana has three wheels and can roll around, it can also play its little xylophone if programmed to do so. Yana, which the creative team behind the robots calls the storyteller, is able to make different recognizable sounds on demand.The team behind Play-i is a collection of people who used to work for big tech companies such as Google, Apple and Frog Design. They started their company with the idea that children are capable of learning sophisticated concepts if they are presented in the right way. Bo and Yana are programmed using kid-friendly icons on a smartphone or tablet (since the operating system is iOS, that means iPhone and iPad, at least for now). To get either of the robots to do something, children develop a story around what it is they want done, then use the icons to develop the story, which results in the robots carrying out actions that follow what they’ve described. One example would be having Bo retrieve a flower from another robot, or a person, then carry it to someone else for presentation. Yana on the other hand can be taught to emit a sound like a helicopter if someone touches it. The concept is simple, by breaking down something that seems complex into something that is actually small parts of a story, children can develop more complex programs.The Play-i team is also looking to the future with their robots—code that is created from the icons is displayed on the tablet screen so that the child can see what they have wrought—as they grow older they can progress to writing code directly, giving them even more control over their toys.The crowd-funding campaign has a goal of collecting $250,000, if that number is reached, Play-i says the robots will be available for purchase by this summer, likely priced at $199 and $69 for Bo and Yana respectively. Explore furthercenter_img © 2013 Phys.org Dash Robotics crowdfunding ‘origami’ runner you can assemble at home This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more