STATE REP RACE Candidate Mark Kratman Discusses His Campaign For State Rep

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Your Tewksbury Today Editor Bill Gilman recently interviewed 19th Middlesex State Representative Candidate Mark Kratman (D-Tewksbury).Kratman answers the following questions:What made you decide that this was the right time to run for State Rep?Have you had to work to get yourself known in the Wilmington part of the district?Respond to a recent Patch article highlighting the fact that several builders and developers contributing to your campaign.If you do get elected, how will you be effective for your district without getting into the “cesspool” of Beacon Hill?What are your feelings on the “Millionaire’s Tax?”What is your opinion on sanctuary states and sanctuary cities?What would you like to see the state legislature do to help communities relative to the opioid epidemic and where detox facilities and sober homes should be located?Where can people find out more about you and your campaign?Listen to the 45-minute interview, courtesy of Your Tewksbury Today, below.——Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE: Voting Records Show Prinzivalli Voted Only Once Before Launching Candidacy; Campaign DisputesIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Mark Kratman Holds Successful Campaign Rally, Ready To Fight For Wilmington & Tewksbury At State HouseIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Committee To Elect Mark Kratman Expresses Disappointment With Robertson Campaign’s TacticsIn “Government”last_img read more

The best sunscreens to buy right now

first_img 1 Personal care Now playing: Watch this: How to choose the right sunscreen Sunscreen is a contentious product because there’s often a lot of disagreement on which sunscreen chemicals are safe, what SPF is appropriate and whether sunscreen harms coral reefs or not. Here’s what you should know about sunscreen in 2019: 1. Everyone should wear sunscreen, regardless of your skin color, because anyone can get skin cancer. 2. Sunscreen protects against both UV damage and wrinkles. 3. Both chemical and physical sunscreens are considered effective and safe. Chemical sunscreens contain active ingredients such as oxybenzone, avobenzone, homosalate, octinoxate, octisalate, and octocrylene that absorb UV radiation. 4. Physical sunscreens — with zinc oxide, titanium dioxide or both as active ingredients — are good for those with sensitive skin and acne-prone skin, and new formulas are much easier to blend than earlier, chalky versions. 5. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends using broad-spectrum protection with SPF 30 sunscreen, which blocks UVA and UVB rays. UVA rays speeds up the aging process of skin cells and promote wrinkles, while UVB rays damage skin cells, cause sunburns and are believed to cause skin cancer. 6. No sunscreen can block 100% of UV rays. SPF 30 sunscreens block 97% of UVB rays, and at SPFs above that, the increased protection is negligible.  7. All sunscreens, regardless of SPF, rub off or break down on your skin in the course of 2 hours — even faster if you’re swimming or sweating. 8. The state of Hawaii; Key West, Florida; and a few island nations have banned sunscreens with oxybenzone because a scientific study found that it can kill coral. Currently, none of these bans are in effect — the two in the US start in 2021. Some companies are selling “reef-safe” sunscreens that abide by the ban. These products and services are independently chosen by our editors. CNET may get a share of the revenue if you buy anything featured on our site. The prices are accurate as of publishing time, but may change. The best sunscreens for 2019 71rmjydspal-sl1500 Hawaiian Tropic Best everyday body sunscreen Hawaiian Tropic Sheer Touch Ultra Radiance Sunscreen Lotion SPF 30  This is the sunscreen I currently have and use because it feels lightweight and rubs in easily. It’s like putting on lotion, and it moisturizes like lotion because it has shea butter. Be forewarned this has a subtle shimmer to it, so you’ll look ever-so-slightly glittery. $7.92 at AmazonHate any and all glitter? Try Banana Boat’s Sun Comfort Broad Spectrum Sunscreen Lotion (SPF 50, $10.06 at Amazon) for a similar hydrating option. Best sunscreen for kids 6887033-nocolor-0 Neutrogena Neutrogena Wet Skin Kids Sunscreen Spray Kids rarely want to sit still long enough for you to apply (and reapply) sunscreen. But this formula goes on quickly and is meant to work on wet skin. The spray cuts through water to adhere to skin, so your kids stay protected even as they spend all day getting in and out of the pool. $10.50 for two at Amazonsupergoop-sunscreen Supergoop Best facial sunscreen Supergoop Smooth and Poreless Matte Mineral Sunscreen SPF 40 If you have ever struggled to rub in the white cast left behind by mineral sunscreens, only to end up looking like a ghost, this is your new sunscreen. In recent years, Supergoop has been cranking out new formulas for any need — like powder sunscreen you can swipe on over your makeup during the day — great for oily skin! — or a sunscreen oil that holds in moisture on your skin. I picked up the brand’s Smooth and Poreless at Sephora on a whim, and it’s what I currently use on my face. Of any facial sunscreen I’ve used, I’ve loved this the most because it feels like a primer and blurs my pores. It’s not definitely not cheap, but it’s worth the cost for me. For a cheaper facial sunscreen, check out the Asian sunscreen pick below. $38 at Sephora Best facial sunscreen for sensitive skin EltaMD UV Clear Broad-Spectrum SPF 46 eltamd EltaMD This EltaMD sunscreen is well-loved because despite the fact that it uses zinc oxide, it goes on clear and blends into your skin without leaving a white cast. I’ve tried it firsthand and it glides on so well, you don’t feel like you’re wearing sunscreen. Just be careful when shopping to make sure you buy it directly from Amazon, not a third-party seller, because there are Amazon shoppers who’ve reported receiving counterfeit products. (Shown is the SPF 40 version, but I’ve linked to the SPF 46 version.) $28 at Amazon Best sunscreen for babies Blue Lizard Australian Baby Sunscreen SPF 30+ 81kcksitq5l-sl1500 Blue Lizard Doctors recommend that you limit your baby’s sun exposure with hats, clothing and shade and that you not use sunscreen on infants under six months. Once they reach the six-month milestone, you can use sunscreen, but stick to formulas that are free of dyes and scents and that use minerals (zinc oxide and titanium dioxide) for sun protection. This Blue Lizard formula checks all of those boxes and the bottle turns pink in the sun, to give you a nudge to reapply. $14.98 at Amazon Best sport sunscreen 71aotbrtj1l-sl1500 Neutrogena Neutrogena Beach Defense (Spray, Lotion or Stick)  Sport and water-resistant sunscreens can feel thick and greasy, but I like Neutrogena’s Beach Defense line because it’s more lightweight, water resistant for up to 80 minutes and smells like a tropical beverage. The spray is easy to apply, is water- and sweat-resistant for up to 80 minutes and comes in SPF 70. If you want or need something without a scent, try Banana Boat’s Simply Protect Sports sunscreen, which doesn’t have any added fragrance. $8.79 at Amazon for the spray Best Asian sunscreen Biore UV Aqua Rich Watery Essence Sunscreen SPF 50 613lfin0xul-sl1000 Biore Okay, if you are a skin care nerd like I am, prepare to fall down the Asian sunscreen rabbit hole. South Korean and Japanese skin care brands have become well known for sunscreens that use different chemicals than what’s approved by the FDA in order to provide superior protection. One of the most wildly popular Asian sunscreens is Biore’s, which is a thin, light formula that blends in easily. While you can’t find it in US stores — because of the FDA — they are readily available on Amazon and other retailers, like YesStyle. Just know that these products will ship from Asia, and have to go through customs, so they will almost certainly not arrive within the two-day Prime window. $12.58 at AmazonAnother great option is the COSRX Aloe Soothing Sun Cream SPF50 PA+++ ($12.86) because it applies like a lightweight moisturizer and provides hydration too. If you have sensitive skin, give this formula a try. Share your voice 5:36center_img Sina Schuldt/picture alliance via Getty Images Any doctor will tell you that sunscreen is the secret to great skin. Not only does sunscreen help prevent skin cancer, it also stops the sun’s rays from breaking down the collagen in your skin, which leads to wrinkles and sagging. More than ever before, companies have finally started making sunscreens that you’ll actually want to use. I’m talking facial sunscreens that apply and blend like makeup primer, spray sunscreens you can reapply to your kids right after they jump out of the pool and lightweight lotions you’ll reach for every day. There are now so many brands and great options that finding the best sunscreens available is a big task. The list below scratches the surface, highlighting some of the best-selling sunscreens on Amazon, plus a few formulas that make sunscreen much more palatable to wear.  Read more: La Roche-Posay My Skin Track UV, Shade, Sunburn Alert: How to measure your sun exposure when you’re outside   Tags Comment I got my face professionally scanned for wrinkles and…last_img read more

Youth Says Involvement in Riots Changed His Life

first_imgFrom handcuffs to hard hats, Jamel Maxwell says that his life changed after being arrested during the uprising. (Courtesy photos)Jamel Maxwell was riding the bus to Mondawmin Metro Station last April, when the bus driver announced she wouldn’t be stopping at the end of the line, letting passengers off five blocks away from the station. Maxwell lived south of North Avenue.He walked to Mondawmin Metro Station to transfer to another bus. All the buses were shut down. He walked toward home and into a swelling crowd of youngsters and police equipped in full riot gear, barricading roads in the area. What he didn’t know was that people had begun to gather in what would become known as the Uprising, a day when the frustration for many in Baltimore boiled over in the aftermath of the death of Freddie Gray in police custody.“I wasn’t even going to get into it. But in my mind I’m thinking this is a trap,” Maxwell told the AFRO, “A police officer tells me to keep moving, but I had nowhere to go. The situation was provoked. I got angry and joined the crowd,” he said. He was then arrested and put in handcuffs.An article published in Mother Jones, corroborates Maxwell’s account of that day. According to eyewitness reports, the article said, the blockades “essentially corralled young people in the area” and that “police actions inflamed a tense-but-stable situation.” The article further states that “it was difficult to leave the neighborhood…the kids were stuck there because of police actions.”Maxwell was angry at police, but more angry about the climate and conditions he had to live in as a citizen of Baltimore. He was upset that drugs and violence rule supreme in his neighborhood and that there is very little opportunity for him to grow and make something of himself in the city he calls home.“I was terrified for him,” said Tamara Fitzpatrick, Maxwell’s former English teacher at Edmondson-Westside High School. Initially, she was angry at him for risking his life. “I was taken aback and horrified, but after I thought about it I realized that he wasn’t thinking about being arrested. To him, he was fighting back for years of feeling belittled by society and for feeling like he was nothing.“I contacted him on social media and explained my anger was more of concern for him, that I  loved him and I just wanted him to be safe.”Maxwell studied carpentry while at Edmondson. He played football and ran track.“He was an incredible singer and he made everybody laugh,” said Nichole Wright, a former teacher at Edmondson Westside.Maxwell spent three days in jail for his participation in the riots. He left Central Booking on crutches, but was not charged with a crime. He was let go from his job at Walmart because of his injuries.Maxwell is not proud of the part he played in the riots but says he would not change anything about that day. “Yes, it was stupid, but it was an eye opener for me to see how crazy this world really is–there is no love in this city. Everything and everybody is disconnected. There is no loyalty or respect in the streets. Too much of my generation is out here thugging and bugging out on these pills, losing there minds, killing each other for nothing.”Maxwell is heading further south to start a job in construction while he pursues a career in entertainment. The city is full of people with no faith, Maxwell says, which is why he won’t be coming back anytime soon.Recently, Maxwell traveled to Atlanta, Ga., to reunite with his father, who left Baltimore when Maxwell was 13. “He seems to be doing well in Georgia. I hope that he builds a comfortable life there and stays,” said Horton. “Visit Baltimore, but do not come back. The city has gone through so much, and I don’t want it to drag him down in the process.”An opportunity to travel allowed him space to regroup. “I realized that I had an opportunity to do something with my life, We all do,” said Maxwell. “It’s hard out here, but Baltimore builds character and strength. There is nothing your faith can’t carry you through. If you can make it here you can make it anywhere.”last_img read more

Japanese Team Tokai wins the 3021 km 2011 Veolia World Solar Challenge

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Through a smoldering brush fire, past wind-shearing road trains, across the Australian continent, the University of Michigan’s Quantum was the first American car to finish the World Solar Challenge. The Solar Car team placed third overall in the international competition. This is the second victory in a row for Team Tokai; they took home the prize the last time the race was run two years ago. Initially the race was held every three years, but in 1999, it was decided that two years would be better. Over the history of the race, fourteen races have been conducted and Japanese teams have won six, including this year. Teams from the Netherlands have also had some success, wining four. A team from the United States won the first race, but has not been able to repeat that success since.This year the race was particularly emotional for the Japanese team as they dedicated their race to the reconstruction efforts still going on in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami that struck the country last March. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Interview with driver/pilot of Tokai Challenger 2 of Tokai University of Japan at Victoria Square in Adelaide, Australia on Oct. 20, 2011. And while the race has been running since last Sunday (October 16), the contestants were obviously only able to run at night. The actual driving time for the winning car was 32 hours and 45 minutes. Over the course of the race, the cars were stopped at seven checkpoints to allow the teams to see how things were going with the driver and the car, to check weather, etc. Each team was only allowed to perform very routine maintenance such as clearing debris that had accumulated and inflating tires. More information: www.worldsolarchallenge.org/ Team Tokai’s car, sponsored by Panasonic, is basically a tricycle with a high-end carbon frame which is covered with HIT solar panels supplied by Panasonic. Inside, in addition to the driver, is an electric motor and 8650-type high-capacity lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. At its fastest, the car can travel 160 km/h, though for the race it averaged 91.54 kilometers per hour. Explore further Citation: Japanese Team Tokai wins the 3,021 km 2011 Veolia World Solar Challenge (2011, October 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-10-japanese-team-tokai-km-veolia.html Japanese solar car leads race Down Under Coming in second, just 30 minutes behind the winners, was Nuon Solar, the Team from the Netherlands. The team from the University of Michigan came in third.The race, which was started in 1987 as a means of promoting solar-powered technology had 37 entrants this year, and put drivers through a variety of challenges including wild animals, high temperatures, road trains (trucks with multiple trailers), high winds and a bushfire that put a stop to the race at one point. Team Philippines ran into a very serious problem on Wednesday when its battery exploded after overheating. The battery was replaced and the team forged ahead, showing just how much fortitude the contestants must possess. Image credit: World Solar Challenge (PhysOrg.com) — The Japanese Tokai University Solar Car Team has won the Veolia World Solar Challenge, a 3,021 kilometer race between tiny cars relying on mostly solar power. Running between Darwin, a remote town in one of the most northern parts of Australia, and the city of Adelaide in the very south, the race bisects the continent and takes the drivers and their teams through some very hostile territory. Image credit: World Solar Challengelast_img read more