New Music Monday: Roadkill Ghost Choir

first_img The Quietest and Loneliest Roads in America Editors’ Recommendations An Introduction to the Fine Sport of Bouldering Live Out Your Westworld Dreams at Casteel Creek Retreat The Best Campgrounds Near Major U.S. Cities Sound of Lapland Captures the Pristine Beauty of Finland on a Mixtape “Combining the experimental edge of Radiohead and the dusty roots-rock of Tom Petty, the five-piece make music that sounds tailor-made for arena-sized, prog-rock festivals and grassy, pastoral stages alike.” – Consequence of Sound“…an exciting build from what we heard on Quiet Light.” – Paste MagazineEmerging fully-formed from the desolate heart of Central Florida, Roadkill Ghost Choir make unsettling, powerful American rock, Tom Petty by way of Radiohead and Cormac McCarthy. Set against Kiffy Meyer’s ghostly steel pedal, singer and main songwriter Andrew Shepard triumphantly conjures an allegorical American landscape of drifters, specters, and violent saints. Andrew’s brothers Maxx (drums) and Zach (bass) Shepard round out the rhythm section, and Stephen Garza handles lead guitar. The band released their debut EP Quiet Light in 2013 in the midst of a touring run that saw them opening for Band of Horses and 2013 festival slots at New York’s Governor’s Ball, Austin City Limits, and Shaky Knees in Atlanta, GA. In January 2014 the band was invited to perform on the David Letterman Show, where they performed standout track “Beggar’s Guild.” The band’s full-length debut, In Tongues, recorded in Athens, Ga., and in its home studio in Deland, Fla., with producer Doug Boehm, is out August 19. The band will be touring supporting the new album, including stops at Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza.Purchase Roadkill Ghost Choir’s In Tongues on Amazon or iTunes.last_img read more

US home construction rises in March after bitter winter led by gain

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Paul Wiseman, The Associated Press Posted Apr 16, 2014 7:19 am MDT US home construction rises in March after bitter winter, led by gain in single-family homes This Friday, March 21, 2014 photo shows roofers installing a roof on a new construction home in Pepper Pike, Ohio. The Commerce Department reports on U.S. home construction in March later Wednesday April 16, 2014. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak) WASHINGTON – U.S home construction rose moderately in March as builders resumed work at the end of a frigid winter. But applications for building permits slid, clouding the outlook for future construction.Builders started work on 946,000 homes at a seasonally adjusted annual rate in March, up 2.8 per cent from 920,000 in February, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. Construction of single-family homes rose 6 per cent, more than offsetting a 3.1 per cent drop in the construction of apartments, condominiums and town houses.As the weather moderated, construction rose 30.7 per cent in the Northeast and jumped 65.5 per cent in the Midwest. But it fell 9.1 per cent in the South and 4.5 per cent in the West.Applications for permits, a gauge of future activity, fell 2.4 per cent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 990,000.“The outcome is less dynamic than anticipated,” Annalisa Piazza, an economist at Newedge Strategy, said in a research report.Economists had expected housing starts to hit 970,000 last month. Piazza noted that housing construction in March was 5.9 per cent less than a year earlier.“It echoes several of the other reports we’ve seen of late which do show a spring snapback, but one not nearly as strong as once hoped,” said Dan Greenhaus, chief strategist at BTIG.Many analysts have been expecting an improving economy to lift the housing market, which has been recovering the past two years. But housing has struggled to maintain momentum. Rising prices and higher mortgage rates have deterred some home buyers. Others have had trouble qualifying for mortgages.Builders complain of a shortage of workers and lots to build on.U.S. homebuilders’ confidence in the housing market rose modestly in April but remained at low levels for the third straight month, according to the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index, which came out Tuesday.The index, which measures confidence in the single-family home market, edged up to 47 in April from 46 in March., Readings below 50 mean builders view sales conditions as poor. The index had been above 50 from June through January.Still, the March gain in single-family home construction is encouraging. Every single-family home built creates three jobs and generates $90,000 in tax revenue, according to the homebuilders’ group. read more