HHS allocates $498 million for hospital preparedness

first_imgMay 27, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced this week it is allocating $498 million for grants to states to help healthcare facilities improve their ability to cope with bioterrorist attacks and other emergencies that could cause many casualties.With this year’s awards, HHS will have provided more than $1.5 billion for hospital preparedness over the past 3 years, the agency said. The grants go to states, territories, and four metropolitan areas: New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, DC.The main purpose of the funding is to help healthcare facilities prepare for mass casualties that could result from bioterrorist attacks, other disease outbreaks, and natural disasters, HHS said in a news release. Other goals include improving the coordination of disease reporting by hospitals and state and local health departments, enhancing disease-reporting coordination among public health laboratories and hospital laboratories, and harmonizing the communication capabilities of these organizations.”States and communities can use these funds to improve emergency care in any health crisis, whether the source is a bioterror attack or other infectious disease outbreaks like SARS or West Nile virus, or any natural disaster like a flood or hurricane,” HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson stated in a news release.The grants to states range from $1.75 million for Wyoming to $38.8 million for California. The funds are handled by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). The agency awards a base grant of $1 million to each state or city, and the additional amount is based on population, according to HRSA officials.HRSA Administrator Elizabeth M. Duke, PhD, said hospitals can use the money to improve their ability to quickly add beds, isolate and decontaminate patients, find qualified volunteer healthcare workers, and plan for hospital-based caches of drugs and medical supplies.To qualify for the funds, states, cities, and territories have to update their hospital preparedness plans by reporting their achievements the previous year and plans for the coming year, HRSA officials told CIDRAP News.The states and other jurisdictions must submit applications for this year’s round of grants by July 1, said Richard J. Smith, director of HRSA’s Division of Healthcare Emergency Preparedness. The agency sent out guidance information on how to prepare the applications May 24, he told CIDRAP News.Smith said he couldn’t give specifics on how much of the hospital preparedness money awarded in the past 2 years has been used so far. Of the funds awarded in 2002, “We know that virtually all of that money, in excess of 90%, has been expended,” he said. Some of the fiscal year 2003 funds awarded last year have not yet been spent, he added, but he couldn’t give figures. Jurisdictions are allowed to carry over funds from the previous year provided they have a plan for using them.HRSA has not yet done a formal assessment of what has been achieved with the hospital preparedness funds awarded in recent years, according to Smith. However, the agency has established 15 “critical benchmarks” of preparedness, and in the applications they submit this year, states are required to report on certain “sentinel indicators” related to those benchmarks, he said.For example, states are being asked to report how many people have been enrolled in a registry of volunteer healthcare professionals who could help hospitals in a major emergency, Smith said.See also:May 24 HHS news releasehttp://archive.hhs.gov/news/press/2004pres/20040524.htmllast_img read more

CONCACAF qualifiers will not start until March: FIFA

first_imgThe start of the 2022 World Cup qualifying competition in the CONCACAF region, comprising North and Central America and the Caribbean, has been delayed until March next year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, global soccer body FIFA said on Tuesday.FIFA said it had taken the decision jointly with the CONCACAF confederation after deciding that the international dates in October and November were too early for play to restart.”Many parts of the region continue to have very challenging public health situations, and that has been a key factor in this decision,” said FIFA in a statement.”Additionally, several countries across the confederation have travel restrictions and quarantine requirements, which would make international football involving 30 national teams extremely difficult.” Topics :last_img read more

Evergreen Featured in The Princeton Review’s 2014 Guide to 332 Green…

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by The Evergreen State CollegeThe Evergreen State College is one of the 332 most environmentally responsible colleges in the U.S. and Canada, according to The Princeton Review.  The education services company, known for its influential college rankings, profiles Evergreen in the fifth annual edition of “The Princeton Review’s Guide to 332 Green Colleges.”“Green thinking is integrated not only in the way we operate our campus, but in everything we do at Evergreen,” said Scott Morgan, director of sustainability at the college.  “Some seventy percent of our curriculum integrates our commitment to the environment and sustainability.  It’s woven into the very fabric of our identity and history as an institution.”The Princeton Review chose the schools for this guide based on a survey it conducted in 2013 of administrators at hundreds of four-year colleges to measure the schools’ commitment to the environment and to sustainability.  The institutional survey included questions on the schools’ course offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation.The Princeton Review created its “Guide to 332 Green Colleges” in partnership with the Center for Green Schools (www.usgbc.org) at the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).In the guide’s profile on Evergreen, The Princeton Review highlights the college’s free bus pass program, which reduces vehicular pollution; innovative heating and water conservation systems for campus housing; and the student green energy fee, which enables the college to use 100 percent renewable electricity and support hands-on student conservation projects.“We are pleased to recommend Evergreen to the many students seeking colleges that practice and promote environmentally-responsible choices and practices,” said Rob Franek, publisher of The Princeton Review.Franek noted recent survey findings indicating significant interest among college applicants in attending “green” colleges. “Among 10,116 college applicants who participated in our 2014 ‘College Hopes & Worries Survey,’ 61 percent said having information about a school’s commitment to the environment would influence their decision to apply to or attend the school,” he said.The Evergreen State College is a nationally acclaimed public liberal arts and sciences college, offering outstanding academics at a moderate cost, according to the Fiske Guide to Colleges.last_img read more