Laserinduced graphene gets tough with help

first_img Return to article. Long DescriptionComposites of laser-induced graphene with a variety of other materials are tested for their anti-icing capabilities. Electrifying the thin, hydrophobic material prevents ice from forming on the surface. Courtesy of the Tour Group https://news-network.rice.edu/news/files/2019/02/0218_LIG-1-web-1i3zsjd.jpegRice University scientists have combined laser-induced graphene with a variety of materials to make robust composites for a variety of applications. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) Rice University scientists have combined laser-induced graphene with a variety of materials to make robust composites for a variety of applications. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionA scanning electron microscope image shows a composite of laser-induced graphene and polystyrene. Courtesy of the Tour GroupSoft composites can be used for active electronics in flexible clothing, Tour said, while harder composites make excellent superhydrophobic (water-avoiding) materials. When a voltage is applied, the 20-micron-thick layer of LIG kills bacteria on the surface, making toughened versions of the material suitable for antibacterial applications.Composites made with liquid additives are best at preserving LIG flakes’ connectivity. In the lab, they heated quickly and reliably when voltage was applied. That should give the material potential use as a deicing or anti-icing coating, as a flexible heating pad for treating injuries or in garments that heat up on demand.“You just pour it in, and now you transfer all the beautiful aspects of LIG into a material that’s highly robust,” Tour said.Rice graduate students Duy Xuan Luong and Kaichun Yang and former postdoctoral researcher Jongwon Yoon, now a senior researcher at the Korea Basic Science Institute, are co-lead authors of the paper. Co-authors are former Rice postdoctoral researcher Swatantra Singh, now at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, and Rice graduate student Tuo Wang. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice.The Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation supported the research.A hydrophilic composite of laser-induced graphene and other materials readily soaks up water. Courtesy of the Tour Group-30-Read the abstract at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsnano.8b09626.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Laser-induced graphene: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.accounts.8b00084Tour Group: https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2023/IMG14453.jpg” alt=”last_img” />

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