VMEC ELECTS THREE NEW MEMBERS TO BOARD

first_imgRandolph Center, VTDecember 16, 2004The Vermont Manufacturing Extension Center (VMEC) announced the addition of three new members to their Advisory Board. Monica Greene, Gerald Brown, and Gary Rabidoux have been elected to the 14-member VMEC Board that is comprised of Vermont manufacturers representing a broad cross section of industries and other leaders who strongly support manufacturing. Greene is President and CFO of Vermont Precision Tools, Inc., Brown is the President and Board Chairman of the Vermont Council for Quality, and Rabidoux is Senior Director, Value Net Integration at General Dynamics Armament & Technology Products (GDATP).Monica Greene is a graduate of Champlain College and has been with Vermont Precision Tools (formerly Vermont Gage) since 1982.She has been a Partner since 1996. The company manufacturers high speed steel tooling and fixed limit gaging. Monica has also served on the Boards of Directors for the Franklin County Industrial Development Corp., Lake Champlain Islands Chamber of Commerce, and the Alburg Industrial Park and is the Chair of the Alburg Steering Committee.Gerald Brown was President of Vermont Heating and Ventilating Co. from 1956 to 2000 when he retired. His dedication to training and education led to his involvement in the Vermont Construction Training Council and Human Resource Investment Council. He has served on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Private Industry Council, is a past Chair of the National Association of State Workforce Investment Policy Council Chairs, served on the board of the US Department of Labors Workforce Excellence Network and was the first Interim Chair for the National Leadership Institute.Gary Rabidoux has 38 years of experience in operations, materials and Value Net Integration management. He has served as Director of Operations for multiple ATP manufacturing sites throughout the country. Gary is the GDATP lead for Lean Manufacturing for all ATP manufacturing sites and is a representative on the General Dynamics Corporate Lean Subcommittee.According to VMEC Director/CEO Bob Zider, We are very pleased to have these experienced manufacturers serve on the VMEC Board. I am confident that their ongoing input and counsel will only strengthen the outreach and quality of assistance that VMEC is able to provide to Vermonts approximately 2,000 manufacturers.###About VMECVMEC’s Mission is “To improve manufacturing in Vermont and strengthen the global competitiveness of the state’s smaller manufacturers.” This is done through professional consulting, one-on-one coaching and public/onsite workshops to help Vermont’s approximately 2,000 small and medium sized manufacturers increase their productivity, modernize their manufacturing and business processes, adopt advanced technologies, reduce costs, and improve their competitiveness. Increased competitiveness means greater stability in the state’s work force, improved efficiencies. Visit www.vmec.org(link is external) for more information.last_img read more

Got E coli ? Outbreak showed danger of raw milk

first_img CDC. Echerichia coli O157:H7 infection associated with drinking raw milk—Washington and Oregon, November-Decmeber 2005. MMWR 2007 Mar 2;56(8):165-7 [Full text] See also: Mar 2, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Federal health officials are using an analysis of an Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak that involved 18 cases in December 2005 to remind people of the dangers of drinking unpasteurized milk. FDA news releasehttp://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01576.html Five patients were hospitalized, and four of them had hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potentially fatal kidney disorder. The hospitalized patients were all children (aged 1 to 13). The FDA statement listed higher numbers, saying the CDC identified 45 outbreaks linked to raw milk or cheese made from raw milk between 1998 and May 2005. Those outbreaks involved 1,007 illnesses, 104 hospitalizations, and 2 deaths. The statement didn’t specify whether this included all pathogens, and FDA officials could not be reached for clarification this afternoon. In a news release yesterday, the Food and Drug Administration said raw milk can be contaminated not only with E coli, but also with Salmonella, Listeria, Campylobacter, and Brucella species. Investigators analyzed the DNA fingerprints of E coli O157:H7 from eight patients and found that seven of them matched one another and also matched isolates from milk samples and environmental samples from the milking-parlor floor, the report says. In addition, there was a dose-response relationship between milk consumption and the risk of illness, with a 37.5% risk for those who drank 3 or more cups daily.center_img By interviewing 43 of 45 families who held shares in the cows, health investigators found 18 cases of E coli infection, 8 of which were laboratory-confirmed, according to the report in today’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Repor (MMWR). The 18 case-patients constituted 13% of the 140 people who reported drinking raw milk from the farm. Raw milk has been banned from interstate commerce since 1987, but it can be sold legally in 27 states. However, “Because raw milk certification has failed to prevent many raw-milk-associated infections in the past, consumers should not assume that certified raw milk is free of pathogens,” the CDC says. The FDA noted that proponents of raw milk claim that it is more nutritious than pasteurized milk and is inherently antimicrobial. “Research has shown that these claims are myths,” the statement said. The MMWR report says 33 outbreaks linked to raw milk, involving E coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Campylobacter, were reported to the CDC from 1988 through 2005. The outbreak was traced to a farm in Cowlitz County, Washington, that ran a cow-share program, in which people bought interests in dairy cows and received raw milk in return, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Raw milk can be sold legally in Washington state under a licensing system, but the farm blamed for the outbreak was not licensed, according to the CDC. Inspectors said they found mud and manure on the floor of the milking area, inadequate handwashing facilities, and improper procedures for cleaning equipment.last_img read more