Listen to Jerry Garcia Wail On ‘Mighty High’ From Previously Unreleased 1976 JGB Show

first_imgComing out August 19th, the new volume of the GarciaLive series focuses in on a great time in the career of Jerry Garcia. Taken from a performance in Palo Alto, CA on November 8th, 1976, Garcia teams with bassist John Kahn, drummer Ron Tutt, keyboardist Keith Godchaux and vocalist Donna Jean Godchaux for the performance. It was Donna who actually discovered this recording, which was thought to be lost for years. The tape was stored for decades in her garage!Garcia took advantage of the Grateful Dead’s mid-1970’s hiatus to truly explore new sounds and styles. Ever the open-minded musician, Garcia found himself dabbling in the gospel genre, and working up a cover of Mighty Clouds of Joy’s 1975 hit, “Mighty High,” for his solo band. While a studio version of “Mighty High” was recorded for Cats Under The Stars later on, this 1976 version is brimming with energy as Garcia infuses some disco grooves throughout.Listen to the new version of “Mighty High” ahead of the GarciaLive Volume Seven: November 8th, 1976 – Jerry Garcia Band album release, as premiered by Rolling Stone.You can also read more about this new archival release and listen to “After Midnight” here.last_img read more

Leftover Salmon Announces Extensive Summer Tour For New Album, ‘Something Higher’

first_imgLeftover Salmon is currently in for a huge 2018. On May 4th, the Colorado-based genre-bending American roots band will release Something Higher, a follow-up to 2014’s studio album, High Country, and 2016’s celebratory anniversary live album, 25. Produced by the band’s long-time producer Steve Berlin (Los Lobos), Something Higher was recorded at the famous Wavelab Studio in Tucson, Arizona, in analog and shows Leftover Salmon at their finest—drawing upon and infusing a dizzying breadth of influences ranging from zydeco to R&B to jazz, blues, bluegrass, and more.Appropriately, once Leftover Salmon’s Something Higher drops in early May, the six-piece band will embark on an extensive tour in promotion of the new record, and today, the group has clued fans in to where they’ll be headed in the coming months. On the day of the album’s release, May 4th, Leftover Salmon will play a special hometown album-release show at eTown in Boulder, Colorado (tickets available exclusively here). The following day, on May 5th, the group will return to Red Rocks Amphitheatre to co-headline the iconic venue with Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band.From there, the band launches fully into their tour, kicking things off with a performance at the Baltimore Soundstage on May 9th. The group will detour down through Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina before starting the Midwest leg of their tour on May 15th at Cleveland, Ohio’s Music Supper Club. After performances in Michigan, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Illinois, the band will begin to head southwards, with dates in Arkansas, Tennessee, and Mississippi as May turns into June. To round out the new tour dates, Leftover Salmon will finish out their summer tour with shows in Sandpoint, Idaho; Whitefish, Montana; and Haugan, Montana from June 7th through 9th.You can check out the band’s full upcoming summer tour dates below. You can also listen to the first single off Something Higher, “Show Me Something Higher”, here, and head over to the band’s website for ticketing information!last_img read more

The Obama years, in photos

first_imgHe snapped 243,000 photos a year — give or take.That was Pete Souza’s average picture count during his years as the official White House photographer for President Barack Obama, for a staggering total estimate of 1.95 million.“I wanted it to be the best archive we’ve ever had of a president,” Souza said of his work documenting Obama’s presidency. At the Harvard Kennedy School’s JFK Jr. Forum on Wednesday, Souza took the audience on a highlights tour of the Obama years, sharing the stories behind a number of iconic photos and a few lesser-known images.Ann Marie Lipinski NF ’90, curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard, opened the event, praising Souza’s “distinctive and probing” photography. “I should just stop now,” Souza joked, stepping up to the microphone following Lipinski’s comments. He gave the audience a brief history of the White House photo office, and shared a few images from his first stint on that staff, as the official White House photographer for President Ronald Reagan.A packed JFK Jr. Forum listens as Souza reflects on his favorite portraits of President Obama. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerSouza’s images from the Obama years, many of which will appear in his forthcoming book, spanned the breadth of Obama’s presidency, from the serious to the lighthearted. Several photos emphasized Obama’s role as statesman and commander-in-chief, such as from the March 2010 passage of the Affordable Care Act, which Souza dubbed “the best day” of Obama’s presidency. Then there was the deep grief of the 2012 shooting in Newtown, Conn., which Souza called “the worst day.”Souza also shared a close shot of a marked-up speech in Obama’s hand, and a tense, candid group photo snapped in a small room near the Situation Room during the 2011 raid to capture Osama bin Laden. “The most powerful people in the world couldn’t do a thing but watch,” Souza said of that photograph, which included, among others, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.Many of Souza’s images highlighted the humanity of Obama’s presidency: a quiet moment on a swing set on the White House lawn with his elder daughter, Malia; dancing with his wife, Michelle, at the Governors’ Ball; stepping in to coach his younger daughter Sasha and her basketball teammates on a Saturday afternoon. “He was coaching them like it was the NBA finals,” Souza said, laughing.Ann Marie Lipinski introduced Souza before acting as moderator. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerSouza also spoke about the balance between aesthetic and narrative: shots that capture an arresting visual moment versus those that tell a story. Though his work usually leans toward the latter, he included a few aesthetic “wow” shots in his presentation, including one of a fog-swathed Air Force One in Seattle, and a photo of the president’s hand opening onto a rainbow in Jamaica.Throughout his time as White House photographer, Souza sought to capture the human moments: a little boy named Jacob reaching up to touch the president’s hair; a private exchange with Michelle during a lull in the festivities on Obama’s first inauguration night; and multiple joyous encounters with staffers’ young children. Souza has shared many of his Obama photos on his popular Instagram feed, about which he admitted, “I get a little unruly sometimes.”Pointing to an image of White House staffers in the Oval Office, Souza noted that the Obama presidency included “a lot of seriousness and a lot of fun.” His photos, and the stories behind them, reflected both.last_img read more

Hogan named chairman of Trustees at Vermont College of Fine Arts

first_imgMT Anderson, Chris Graff, Governor Madeline Kunin and Bill Schubart also join boardVermont College of Fine Arts, a graduate school for visual art and writing based in Montpelier, Vermont, today announced that Cornelius ( Con ) Hogan has been named chairman of its Board of Trustees.Hogan, a well-known figure in Vermont, has served on the Board of Trustees since 2007. He is currently a senior fellow with the Center for the Study of Social Policy, and he is recognized nationally for his work in public and human service, including engagements with the Annie E. Casey and Robert Wood Johnson foundations and the National Center for Children in Poverty.   Hogan has been a director of Fletcher Allen Health Care and secretary of Vermont’s Agency of Human Services.  We are so honored as a community that Con has agreed to chair this board, said Thomas Christopher Greene, president of Vermont College of Fine Arts. He brings tremendous wisdom, leadership and experience to this task, and I look forward to working closely with him to realize our vision of a national center of fine arts in Montpelier.In addition, four other renowned individuals have joined the VCFA Board of Trustees: M.T. Anderson, Chris Graff, Governor Madeline Kunin and Bill Schubart.M. T. (Tobin) Anderson is a New York Times bestselling writer of young adult novels. Anderson taught in the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing for Children & Young Adults program from 2001 to 2006, and he served as chair of the program for four years. His book The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Volume 1: The Pox Party (2006), the first in a two-part novel, won the 2006 National Book Award for Young People, the Boston Globe Horn Book Award, as well as a Printz Honor in 2007. His latest book, The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume II: The Kingdom on the Waves, was just awarded the Printz Honor for literary excellence in young adult literature. Anderson lives in Boston.Chris Graff is vice president of National Life Group, a financial services company based in Montpelier, Vermont. Graff is a former journalist with The Associated Press and is the author of Dateline Vermont, a memoir of his 30 years in journalism. For 15 years, Chris hosted Vermont This Week, a public affairs program on Vermont Public Television. He is a contributing editor of Vermont Business Magazine and a member of the Council on the Future of Vermont. Graff resides in Montpelier, Vermont.Madeleine Kunin is the first female Governor of Vermont, 1985 1991, and the fourth female governor elected in the U.S. In the Clinton administration, she was Deputy Secretary of Education, 1993 96, and Ambassador to Switzerland, 1996 99. In 1991 she founded The Institute for Sustainable Communities and is a Marsh Professor at the University of Vermont. She is the author of Pearls, Politics and Power, How Women Can Win and Lead (2008), Living a Political Life (1994), and The Big Green Book (1975). Kunin s commentaries can be heard on Vermont Public Radio and she has a blog on the Huffington Post. Kunin lives in Burlington, Vermont.Bill Schubart, a writer who cofounded Philo Records and Resolution, Inc.,  recently published a book of stories called Lamoille Stories. Schubart writes and speaks extensively on the media and other civic issues and is currently a commentator for Vermont Public Radio. Schubart has previously chaired the boards of the Vermont Arts Council, Vermont Folklife Center, Vermont Board of Libraries, Vermont Bicentennial Commission, Circus Smirkus, Vermont Public Radio, and Fletcher Allen Health Care. Schubart lives in Hinesburg, Vermont.In addition to the above five directors, the VCFA Board of Directors includes:Robert H. Atwell (Sarasota, FL and Stowe, VT), former President of the American Council on Education and former president of Pitzer College in Claremont, California.Tami Lewis Brown (Washington, DC), an 06 graduate of the MFA in Writing for Children & Young Adults program, a published novelist, and an attorney.Dr. Letitia Chambers (Lighthouse Point, FL), Managing Director with Navigant Consulting, Inc., and former chair of the New Mexico higher education system. Kathleen Dolan (Woodstock, VT), a 95 graduate of the MFA in Visual Art program, founder and director of Purple Crayon Productions, and member of the Dolan Family Foundation. Gail Gregg (New York, NY), a 98 graduate of the MFA in Visual Art program, and a New York City artist, writer, and arts educator.Joan Grubin (New York, NY), a practicing artist and 03 graduate of the MFA in Visual Art program.   Mary Hooper (Montpelier, VT), the mayor of Montpelier and a Vermont State Representative.  Sydney Lea (Newbury, VT), a Pulitzer prize nominated poet who taught at VCFA s MFA in Writing program.Susan M. Newbold (Fairfield, CT), an artist and educator who graduated in 00 from the MFA in Visual Art program. Katherine Paterson (Barre, VT), author of more than 30 books, including Bridge to Terabithia and 14 other novels for young people. Peter Richardson (Charlotte, VT), president of Housing Strategies, Inc.Richard H. Saudek (Montpelier, VT), a distinguished Vermont attorney and principal in the law firm of Cheney, Brock & Saudek.  Peter Smith (Lighthouse Pt., FL), a former congressman from Vermont who founded two colleges: the Community College of Vermont, and the University of California at Monterey Bay.Linda Stillman (New York), an 03 graduate of the MFA in Visual Art program and an artist in New York City.  Trustee Emeritus:Harry Groome (Villanova, PA), an 00 graduate of the MFA in Writing program, and retired chairman of SmithKline Beecham Consumer HealthCare.   About VCFAA nationally recognized graduate school for the arts based in Montpelier, Vermont, VCFA has three low-residency MFA programs in Writing, Writing for Children & Young Adults, and Visual Art. Founded in 2008, Vermont College of Fine Arts is the first new independent college formed in Vermont in 23 years, and the only institution of its kind a low-residency graduate school devoted exclusively to fine arts education. For more information, visit www.vermontcollege.edu(link is external).last_img read more

The dynamics of the share portfolio in third quarter 2018

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Consumer confidence in the marketplace remained high in the fall of 2018, and the spending habits of credit union members reflect that. Third quarter loan growth is on track to outpace share growth by 4.5 percentage points, according to available performance data representing more than 99% of the industry’s assets.Callahan & Associates projects share growth among the nation’s credit unions will decelerate for a second consecutive year. It is currently on pace to drop 1.5 percentage points year-over-year to 5.2%.Still, balances have increased across all share types except IRA and Keogh accounts. The growth for that account code is down 0.5% over the year to $78.6 billion. Share certificates are on track to increase 9.2% year-over-year, and balances are set to reach $230.3 billion as of Sept. 30, 2018. The third quarter growth rate in share certificates is 39 basis points faster than one year ago. This is the highest certificate growth since the first quarter of 2008 and is the only accelerated annual growth in the share portfolio.last_img read more

The card-not-present chronicles: As members shift to e-commerce, a new debit card frontier emerges

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Doug Leighton Doug Leighton, Head of Community Accounts, leads a national team of Account Executives and Managers responsible for sales and relationship activities at over 3,000 US-based Credit Unions. In this … Web: https://usa.visa.com Details We are in the midst of a sea change with how members shop and view their payment options as more turn to shopping digitally. It is a game changing opportunity for retailers and a bellwether for financial institutions to ready their infrastructure for increases in e-commerce and online transactions.A credit union’s ability to help facilitate a seamless online shopping experience to its customers is one of the most potent competitive differentiators in the current COVID-19 work from home economy. Credit unions that fail to rethink their e-commerce strategy will fall behind and lose market share along with a long standing impact on their growth and profitability.A case for debit cards and the importance of optimizing your debit e-commerce strategyThe top three use cases for debit cards have traditionally been face-to-face interactions – in a recent study, customers use their debit cards primarily to get cash from the ATM (72%), to pay for things in store by PIN (69%), and to pay for things in store by signature (52%). When consumers shop online (also known as card-not-present or CNP), they tend to reach for their credit cards rather than debit because they perceive credit as a “safer” option. Debit cards are in fact a safe option to use online with embedded features like continuous fraud monitoring and Visa’s Zero Liability Policy, however consumer perception remains misinformed. In addition, the experience of making purchases online tends to be worse than using a debit card in store with over half of credit unions typically declining more than 10 in 100 transactions. Consumer dormancy and spend attrition increases anywhere from 2-7x after a decline and when met with this situation, many consumers unfortunately are left with a lasting impression. This is a significant opportunity for awareness and education with more than 80% of purchase volume coming from debit cards for many credit unions.What can be done?Credit unions need to adapt their debit card programs to better serve their members and their evolving behaviors towards CNP use cases. Members are rethinking their daily habits in the wake of the pandemic including where and how they spend, it is imperative to take a holistic approach to improve and implement tactics that will foster trust across your debit portfolios and optimize the online debit shopping experience.Follow along with The Card-Not-Present Chronicles, a monthly series exploring the top five areas of focus credit unions should be thinking through and implementing to drive debit card usage and a positive e-commerce experience for their members. The series will take a deep dive into:Assessing the performance of your CNP program, identify opportunities, and formulating a strategy to drive growthAuthorization strategy and its impact on customer experience and retentionMass marketing and education campaigns to educate customers about the benefits of using their debit card onlineTargeted marketing campaigns infused with advanced analytics to help drive adoption and spendReward and incentive structures that issuers can put in place to support their debit programsThe next article will dive into the critical first steps that credit unions can take to assess the strength and performance of their card not present program. This will help credit unions understand and better appreciate their current state, before they start formulating a plan to improve their card not present program.last_img read more

Sick, stranded and broke: Crisis hits Gulf’s migrant workers

first_imgWhen all nine men in his dormitory caught coronavirus, 27-year-old Nurudhin was bused to a remote quarantine camp — becoming one of many migrant workers Gulf states are struggling to accommodate adequately.The oil-rich Gulf is reliant on the cheap labor of millions of foreigners — mostly from India, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka — many of whom live in squalid camps far from the region’s showy skyscrapers and malls.But the spread of coronavirus, alongside shrinking oil-driven economies, has left many workers sick and countless others unemployed, unpaid and at the mercy of unscrupulous employers. ‘Worried about our brothers’ The UAE has been the most vocal among Gulf countries in demanding governments repatriate workers, many of whom have been laid off or gone unpaid as business halts and oil prices plummet.As of April 20, some 22,900 foreigners had been repatriated on 127 flights from otherwise closed airports, officials said.But India, which has 3.2 million citizens in the UAE alone, has refused to cooperate, saying that repatriating and quarantining millions of returning citizens would be a logistical and safety nightmare.Bangladesh has reluctantly agreed to take back thousands of its citizens to avoid punishment from Gulf states in the future, its Foreign Minister A.K. Abdul Momen said.”If we don’t bring them home… they won’t recruit people from us once their situation improves,” he told AFP, adding that thousands of undocumented workers and hundreds of prisoners are being flown back, including a planeload from Saudi Arabia last week.Pakistan has allowed repatriations to proceed but warned it is hindered by the lack of testing and quarantine facilities at its airports. Its diplomats in Dubai appealed to Pakistanis not to go to the consulate, after a large number — desperate to return home — gathered to demand seats on limited special flights.”We are worried about our brothers in the Gulf. The lockdown and closure of daily business in the Gulf have rendered many overseas Pakistanis without a livelihood,” Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi said last week.A UAE spokesman said it owed migrant workers a “debt of gratitude” and that it was providing healthcare, food and accommodation, and relaxing immigration rules for those with expiring visas.  “There is nothing in my room except a small bed. I have to share a bathroom with 20 to 30 people,” said Nurudhin, a draftsman from India who was hospitalized before being taken to a remote isolation facility for blue-collar workers in the United Arab Emirates.”There is no WiFi. Not even a television. But the situation in my room was even worse,” he said of his crowded quarters in Abu Dhabi, which proved a fertile ground for the disease.Despite strict curfews in force for weeks, the Gulf states with the biggest populations of foreign workers — Saudi, UAE, Kuwait and Qatar — are still reporting rising numbers of coronavirus cases.Riyadh says foreigners account for 70 to 80 percent of recently discovered cases. Topics :center_img To try to reduce transmission, Gulf authorities have moved workers from camps into temporary lodgings, while establishing mass screening centers and using drones in some neighborhoods to warn people against congregating. Hungry and isolated The pandemic has highlighted the problem of migrant workers living and working in conditions that leave them vulnerable to disease, said Rothna Begum, a senior researcher at Human Rights Watch.Attempts by Gulf states to curb the virus were inflicting more hardship, with lockdowns that left workers short of food and water, she told AFP, adding that charities stepping in were overwhelmed.”Workers who are still required to work are being put on buses where they cannot socially distance, and sent to sites where social distancing is not being practiced or protective equipment and sanitation is not adequately provided,” she said.Millions of migrant workers face future uncertainty as the now unwanted workforce is haggled over by their governments and host countries.”I want to go back to my country… I don’t have any money and I don’t want to spend more time here,” said an Egyptian man in Kuwait City who is being held at a camp for immigration offences.Javed Paresh, a construction worker in the emirate of Sharjah, is among the tens of thousands of Pakistanis who have registered to fly home.”I have not been paid for the last six months. I just want to go home and see my family. My family will die of hunger as I am unable to send them money for many months,” he said.last_img read more

Understand why today’s consumers demand more from convenience

first_imgConvenience, a growing sector predicted to be worth £47.1 billion by 2022, used to mean an acceptance of higher prices with limited choice, but that isn’t the case today. There’s a huge opportunity for brands and retailers to tap into the growing demand for quality, service, innovation and value, when and how consumers want it. In this whitepaper we highlight nine key trends around the changes in consumer behaviour and provide recommendations on how to leverage their future demands. Featuring opinion from retailers and Sun Branding experts, it will provide interesting insight into how forward-thinking international retailers and brand owners are responding to this growing sector.Fill out the form to download the pdf. The Grocer may use your contact data to keep you informed of its products and services by email. You can withdraw your marketing consent at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in such email or by sending an email to [email protected] . More information on our processing can be found in our Privacy Notice . By submitting this form, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Privacy Notice . Company: Sun Branding Format: PDFLength: 25 pagesType: White Paperlast_img read more

Schott, Grabouski ace Friday Modified Duel qualifying features

first_img1st heat ­– 1. Jeremy Payne, Nixa, Mo.; 2. Darrell Hughes II, Manteca, Calif.; 3. Dylan Smith, Osceola, Neb.; 4. Eddie Kirchoff, Gillette, Wyo.; 5. Bryan Burnes, Lemoore, Calif.; 6. Ethan Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif.; 7. Mitchell Niemi, Lakeside, Calif.; 8. Sherman Barnett, El Paso, Texas; 9. Donavon Sorenson, Laurel, Mont.; 10. Kenny Irwin, Bakersfield, Calif.; 11. Peyton Taylor, Batesville, Ark.; 12. Bland Bohannon, Williston, N.D.2nd heat – 1. David Murray Jr., Oberlin, Kan.; 2. Jared Hoefelman, Columbus Neb.; 3. Randy Brown, Chowchilla, Calif.; 4. Bret Bennett, Bakersfield, Calif.; 5. Collen Winebarger, Corbett, Ore.; 6. Chad Reichenbach, Bakersfield, Calif.; 7. Kyle Wilson, Salinas, Calif.; 8. Jason Strand, Portland, N.D.; 9. Joe German, Aberdeen, Wash.; 10. Michael Paul, San Anselmo, Calif.; 11. Dusty Safley, Price, Utah; 12. Doug Rivera, Yuma, Ariz.3rd heat – 1. Lucas Schott, Chatfield, Minn.; 2. Andy Obertello, Hollister, Calif.; 3. Jesse Williamson, Coburg, Ore.; 4. Ricky Thornton Jr., Chandler, Ariz.; 5. Benji LaCrosse, Green Bay, Wis.; 6. Chett Reeves, Bakersfield, Calif.; 7. Wade Taylor, Spring Creek; 8. Jacob Murray, Hartford, Iowa; 9. Jeff Olschowka, Quincy, Calif.; 10. Darren Schatz, Williston, N.D.; 11. Jeff Streeter, Madera, Calif.; Ryan Cotrell, Las Vegas.4th heat – 1. John Hansen, Brush, Colo.; 2. Eddie Belec, Lakewood, Colo.; 3. Dominic Ursetta, Arvada, Colo.; 4. Greg Gustus, Brighton, Colo.; 5. Mark Wauge, Medford, Ore.; 6. Jason Hilliard, Cache, Okla.; 7. Cale Carder, Lake Havasu City, Ariz.; 8. Mickey Stubbings, Helper, Utah; 9. John Piker, Bakersfield, Calif.; 10. Matt Micheli, Live Oak, Calif.; 11. William Heath, Kaiser, Mo.; 12. Ryan Roath, Phoenix, Ariz.5th heat – 1. Rob Sanders, Bakersfield, Calif.; 2. Chris Abelson, Sioux City, Iowa; 3. Justin Kay, Wheatland, Iowa; 4. Robby Sawyer, Bakersfield, Calif. 5. Josh Vogt, Santa Maria, Calif.; 6. Duane Cleveland, Plumas Lake, Calif.; 7. Brian Poppa, Medford, Ore.; 8. Raymond Ketelsen Jr., Aromas, Calif.; 9. David Brown, Kellogg, Iowa; 10. Tony Kinkade Jr., Pahrump; 11. Gordy Beaumont, Charlie Lake, B.C.; 12. Joey Price, Great Falls, Mont.6th heat ­– 1. Ryan Ruter, Kanawha, Iowa; 2. Nick Roberts, Des Moines, Iowa; 3. Jason Beaulieu, Campbell River, B.C.; 4. Nicholas O’Neil, Tucson, Ariz.; 5. Paul Stone, Winton, Calif.; 6. Ryan Daves, Bakersfield, Calif.; 7. William McGuire, Belton, Texas; 8. Mike Villanueva, Atwater, Calif.; 9. Chris Cole, Cache, Okla.; 10. Logan Drake, San Luis Obispo, Calif.; 11. Robert Higgins, Beckwourth, Calif.; 12. Rick Durica, Las Vegas.7th heat – 1, Kody Scholpp, Estevan, Sask.; 2. Zane DeVilbiss, Farmington, N.M.; 3. Clay Daly, Watsonville, Calif.; 4. Shane Hiatt, Rising City, Neb.; 5. Mike Mullen, Suamico, Wis.; 6. Bob Moore, Sioux City, Iowa; 7. Billy Vogel, Fargo, N.D.; 8. Mike Tanner, Smithville, Mo.; 9. P.J. Dyke, Jamul, Calif.; 10. Dale Neitzel, Shepherd, Mont.; 11. Jason Wolla, Ray, N.D.; 12. Kenny Wallace, Concord, N.C.8th heat – 1. Mike Petersilie, Hoisington, Kan.; 2. Mike Wedelstadt, Fremont, Wis.; 3. Ryan Porter, Atwater, Calif.; 4. Joey Moriarty, Glendale, Ariz.; 5. Joel Myers, Santa Rosa, Calif.; 6. Joe Frock, Reno; 7. Chad Melton, Mineral Wells, Texas; 8. Lawrence O’Connor, Port Hardy, B.C.; 9. Richard Anderson, Shelly, Idaho; 10. Rex Merritt, Billings, Mo.; 11. Nick Herrera, Ruidoso Downs, N.M.; 12. Delos Haugen, Burlington, N.D.9th heat – 1. Chad Andersen, Fort Calhoun, Neb.; 2. Rob VanMil, Barnesville, Minn.; 3. William Miller, Yuma, Ariz.; 4. Paris Archie, Sparks; 5. David Day, Sherwood, Ore.; 6. Rick Spangler, Grand Junction, Colo.; 7. Jeff Stafford Sr., New River, Ariz.; 8. Tim Balding, Prunedale, Calif.; 9. Jerry Frydrych, Austin, Texas; 10. Clayton Christensen, Spencer, Iowa; 11. Tyson Groves, Brush, Colo.; 12. Mike Meazell, Gilroy, Calif.10th heat – 1. Ricky Alvarado, Delta, Colo.; 2. Jeff Taylor, Cave City, Ark.; 3. Cody Laney, Torrance, Calif.; 4. Steve Noland, Terra Bella, Calif.; 5. Mike Hagen, Williston, N.D.; 6. Johnny Sheets, Gatesville, Texas; 7. Bricen James, Albany, Ore.; 8. Cory Sample, Winnemucca; 9. Christy Barnett, El Paso, Texas; 10. Freddie Plourde, Santa Rosa, Calif.; 11. Rich Horibe, Pahrump; 12. David Goode Jr., Copperas Cove, Texas.11th heat – 1. Alex Stanford, Chowchilla, Calif.; 2. Dylan Sherfick, WaKeeney, Kan.; 3. Jay Foster, Peoria, Ariz.; 4. Todd Shute, Des Moines, Iowa; 5. Jason Noll, Peoria, Ariz.; 6. Albert Gill, Central Point, Ore.; 7. Nolan Olmstead, Devil’s Lake, N.D.; 8. William Kinden, Williston, N.D.; 9. Alan Sharpensteen, Amarillo, Texas; 10. Robert Hellebust, Minot, N.D.; 11. Chester Kniss, Antioch, Calif.; 12. Kris Asche, Shelton, Wash.12th heat ­– 1. Tim Ward, Gilbert, Ariz.; 2. Mike Densberger, Lincoln, Neb.; 3. Jeremy Frenier, Fort Morgan, Colo.; 4. Johnny Saathoff, Beatrice, Neb.; 5. Jett Big Eagle, Manor, Sask.; 6. Kyle Heckman, Bakersfield, Calif.; 7. Brandon Blochlinger, Concordia, Kan.; 8. Jeff Stafford Jr., New River, Ariz.; 9. Brian Schultz, Casa Grande, Ariz.; 10. Reed Payne, Idaho Falls, Idaho; 11. Cody Grabbe, Yuma, Ariz.; 12. Justen Yeager, Green River, Wyo.13th heat – 1. Travis Hagen, Williston, N.D.; 2. Ryan McDaniel, Olivehurst, Calif.; 3. Tanner Black, Albert, Kan.; 4. Bo Partain, Casa Grande, Ariz.; 5. Jerry Schram, Vancouver, Wash.; 6. Garrett Funk, Phoenix, Ariz.; 7. Richard Papenhausen, Chico, Calif.; 8. Ryan Cousins, Darlingford, Man.; 9. Stephen Streeter, Madera, Calif.; 10. Roger Bonneville, Calgary, Alb.; 11. Andy Freeman, Central Point, Ore.; 12. Don Hagan, Carefree, Ariz.14th heat – 1. Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb.; 2. Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo.; 3. Joey Galloway, Manor, Sask.; 4. Tommy Fain, Abilene, Texas; 5. Roger Holder, Bakersfield, Calif.; 6. Sean Stewart, Bullhead City, Ariz.; 7. Kenny Kirkpatrick, Nipomo, Calif.; 8. Matt Murphy, Susanville, Calif.; 9. Steve Stultz, Peoria, Ariz.; 10. Yancy Shepard, Smithville, Mo.; 11. Spencer Wilson, Minot, N.D.; 12. Chris Clark, Jackson, Wyo.15th heat – 1. R.C. Whitwell, Bakersfield, Calif.; 2. Kyle Brown, State Center, Iowa; 3. John Parmeley, Phoenix, Ariz.; 4. Dustin Andersen, Omaha, Neb.; 5. Masen Big Eagle, Manor, Sask.; 6. Troy Morris Jr., Bakersfield, Calif.; 7. Alexander Wilson, Salinas, Calif.; 8. Sean Fox, St. Helen’s, Ore.; 9. Bryan Wulfenstein, Pahrump; 10. James Ness, Minot, N.D.; 11. Jesse Richter, Great Bend, Kan.; 12. Kevin Fitzgerald, Brentwood, Calif. 16th heat – 1. Steve Boles, Bakersfield, Calif.; 2. Brad Pounds, Bakersfield, Calif.; 3. Zachary Madrid, Phoenix, Ariz.; 4. Casey Delp, Rock Springs, Wyo.; 5. Nick Nelson, Farmington, N.M.; 6. Troy Foulger, Martinez, Calif.; 7. Mitch Dickinson, Monroe, Utah; 8. Billy Wormsbecker, Big Bear Lake, Calif.; 9. Steve Simpson, Kingman, Ariz.; 10. Joe Carr, Petaluma, Calif.; 11. Mark Abouzeid, Chico, Calif.; 12. Bill Egleston, Atwater, Calif.1st “B” feature – 1. Dylan Smith; 2. Bret Bennett; 3. Eddie Kirchoff; 4. Bryan Burnes; 5. Peyton Taylor; 6. Ethan Dotson; 7. Collen Winebarger; 8. Chad Reichenbach; 9. Kyle Wilson; 10. Jason Strand; 11. Mitchell Niemi; 12. Kevin Irwin; 13. Joe German; 14. Donavon Sorenson; 15. Sherman Barnett; 16. Bland Bohannon; 17. Doug Rivera; 18. Michael Paul; 19. Randy Brown; 20. Dusty Safley.2nd “B” feature – 1. Dominic Ursetta; 2. Ricky Thornton Jr.; 3. Benji LaCrosse; 4. Mark Wauge; 5. Jacob Murray; 6. Greg Gustus; 7. Wade Taylor; 8. Chett Reeves; 9. Jason Hilliard; 10. Jeff Streeter; 11. John Piker; 12. Jeff Olschowka; 13. Jesse Williamson; 14. Matt Micheli; 15. Cale Carder; 16. William Heath; 17. Darren Schatz; 18. Mickey Stubbings; 19. Ryan Cotrell; 20. Ryan Roath.3rd “B” feature – 1. Jason Beaulieu; 2. Robby Sawyer; 3. Justin Kay; 4. Paul Stone; 5. Nicholas O’Neil; 6. Duane Cleveland; 7. Mike Villanueva; 8. Brian Poppa; 9. David Brown; 10. William McGuire; 11. Robert Higgins; 12. Gordy Beaumont; 13. Tony Kinkade Jr.; 14. Rick Durica; 15. Raymond Keldsen Jr.; 16. Chris Cole; 17. Joey Price; 18. Josh Vogt; 19. Ryan Daves; 20. Logan Drake.4th “B” feature – 1. Shane Hiatt; 2. Clay Daly; 3. Joey Moriarty; 4. Mike Mullen; 5. Bob Moore; 6. Chad Melton; 7. Jason Wolla; 8. Kenny Wallace; 9. Billy Vogel; 10. Rex Merritt; 11. Lawrence O’Connor; 12. Joel Myers; 13. Richard Anderson; 14. Dale Neitzel; 15. Nick Herrera; 16. Delos Haugen; 17. Ryan Porter; 18. Mike Tanner; 19. P.J. Dyke; 20. Joe Frock.5th “B” feature – 1. Cody Laney; 2. Mike Hagen; 3. Steve Noland; 4. Johnny Sheets; 5. Bricen James; 6. Christy Barnett; 7. Paris Archie; 8. David Goode Jr.; 9. Tim Balding; 10. Rick Spangler; 11. David Day; 12. William Miller; 13. Rich Horibe; 14. Freddie Plourde; 15. Tyson Groves; 16. Mike Meazell; 17. Jeff Stafford Sr.; 18. Cory Sample; 19. Jerry Frydrych; 20. Clayton Christensen.6th “B” feature – 1. Johnny Saathoff; 2. Todd Shute; 3. Jason Noll; 4. Jett Big Eagle; 5. Jay Foster; 6. Brandon Blochlinger; 7. Brian Schultz; 8. Alan Sharpensteen; 9. Nolan Olmstead; 10. Jeff Stafford Jr.; 11. Reed Payne; 12. Chester Kniss; 13. Kris Asche; 14. Cody Grabbe; 15. Jeremy Frenier; 16. Albert Gill; 17. William Kinden; 18. Kyle Heckman; 19. Robert Hellebust; 20. Justen Yeager.7th “B” feature – 1. Joey Galloway; 2. Tanner Black; 3. Roger Holder; 4. Garrett Funk; 5. Yancy Shepard; 5. Kenny Kirkpatrick; 6. Matt Murphy; 7. Steve Stultz; 8. Roger Bonneville; 9. Chris Clark; 10. Stephen Streeter; 11. Andy Freeman; 12. Don Hagan; 13. Bo Partain; 14. Tommy Fain; 15. Jerry Schram; 16. Richard Papenhausen; 17. Ryan Cousins; 18. Sean Stewart; 19. Spencer Wilson.8th “B” feature – 1. Zachary Madrid; 2. Dustin Andersen; 3. Masen Big Eagle; 4. Casey Delp; 5.Troy Foulger; 6. Nick Nelson; 7. John Parmeley; 8. Jesse Richter; 9. Alexander Wilson; 10. Troy Morris Jr.; 11. Mitch Dickinson; 12. Joe Carr; 13. Sean Fox; 14. Billy Wormsbecker; 15. Mark Abouzeid; 16. Bryan Wulfenstein; 17. Steve Simpson; 18. James Ness; 19. Kevin Fitzgerald; 20. Bill Egleston. LAS VEGAS, Nev. (Nov. 13) – Night two at the Duel In the Desert saw Lucas Schott and Jordan Grabouski ace Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified qualifiers at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway Dirt Track.Schott won Friday night’s first feature ahead of Ryan Ruter, Dylan Smith and John Hansen. Joining Grabouski in the top four for the nightcap were R.C. Whitwell, Hunter Marriott and Travis Hagen.All eight drivers advance to Saturday’s $7,777 to win main event. Both qualifying features paid $777 to win.Schott led the first qualifier from the drop of the green and pulled out to nearly a half straightaway lead before fifth-running Jeremy Payne, a four-time Duel winner, slowed in turn two.The race was for second following the ensuing restart as Hansen had his hands full holding off Ruter for second while David Murray Jr. motored behind in fourth.Ruter had caught Hansen for the runner-up spot before 2008 race winner Murray spun on unlucky lap 13. Twenty-sixth starting Benji LaCrosse drove by Eddie Belec and Dylan Smith to crack the top four shortly after the race resumed.Schott kept to the lower line while Ruter ran up high. The distance between the two was down to a car length but Schott kept the front spot until the 25th and final lap was scored.Smith, who’d started 17th, and Hansen both shuffled LaCrosse out of a qualifying spot before the checkers flew.It took Grabouski seven circuits to find his way to the front after starting inside row three in the nightcap, first passing Tim Ward for second and then Ricky Alvarado for the point.Alvarado exited with mechanical issues and shortly afterwards Grabouski was pulling away from Whitwell, his closet pursuit, and entering lapped traffic by midway.While Grabouski negotiated traffic and Whitwell ran a distant second, Marriott and Jeff Taylor both tried to reel in Ward for third.Taylor broke on the backstretch with five laps left. Marriott used a great restart to steal second from Ward and challenge Whitwell. Ward exited the top four with a flat before Grabouski checked out for the victory.Last-chance qualifying fills the starting grid for the main event. If not already vote eligible, the winner becomes a candidate for the 2016 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational.1st qualifier – 1. Lucas Schott, Chatfield, Minn.; 2. Ryan Ruter, Kanawha, Iowa; 3. Dylan Smith, Osceola, Neb.; 4. John Hansen, Brush, Colo.; 5. Benji LaCrosse, Green Bay, Wis.; 6. Justin Kay, Wheatland, Iowa; 7. Eddie Belec, Lakewood, Colo.; 8. Dominic Ursetta, Arvada, Colo.; 9. Eddie Kirchoff, Gillette, Wyo.; 10. Jason Beaulieu, Campbell River, B.C.; 11. Ricky Thornton Jr., Chandler, Ariz.; 12. Bret Bennett, Bakersfield, Calif.; 13. Mike Wedelstadt, Fremont, Wis.; 14. Clay Daly, Watsonville, Calif.; 15. Shane Hiatt, Rising City, Neb.; 16. Zane DeVilbiss, Farmington, N.M.; 17. Robby Sawyer, Bakersfield, Calif.; 18. Mike Petersilie, Hoisington, Kan.; 19. Joey Moriarty, Glendale, Ariz.; 20. Darrell Hughes II, Manteca, Calif.; 21. Nick Roberts, Des Moines, Iowa; 22. Rob Sanders, Bakersfield, Calif.; 23. David Murray Jr., Oberlin, Kan.; 24. Jared Hoefelman, Columbus, Neb.; 25. Jeremy Payne, Nixa, Mo.; 26. Kody Scholpp, Estevan, Sask.; 27. Chris Abelson, Sioux City, Iowa; 28. Andy Obertello, Hollister, Calif.2nd qualifier – 1. Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb.; 2. R.C. Whitwell, Bakersfield, Calif.; 3. Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo.; 4. Travis Hagen, Williston, N.D.; 5. Cody Laney, Torrance, Calif.; 6. Chad Andersen, Fort Calhoun, Neb.; 7. Rob VanMil, Barnesville, Minn.; 8. Brad Pounds, Bakersfield, Calif.; 9. Johnny Saathoff, Beatrice, Neb.; 10. Ryan McDaniel, Olivehurst, Calif.; 11. Dylan Sherfick, WaKeeney, Kan.; 12. Alex Stanford, Chowchilla, Calif.; 13. Joey Galloway, Manor, Sask.; 14. Tanner Black, Albert, Kan.; 15. Steve Boles, Bakersfield, Calif.; 16. Roger Holder, Bakersfield, Calif.; 17. Dustin Andersen, Omaha, Neb.; 18. Mike Densberger, Lincoln, Neb.; 19. Masen Big Eagle, Manor, Sask.; 20. Mike Hagen, Williston, N.D.; 21. Zachary Madrid, Phoenix, Ariz.; 22. Steve Noland, Terra Bella, Calif.; 23. Tim Ward, Gilbert, Ariz.; 24. Jeff Taylor, Cave City, Ark.; 25. Todd Shute, Des Moines, Iowa; 26. Ricky Alvarado, Delta, Colo.; 27. Jason Noll, Peoria, Ariz.; 28. Kyle Brown, State Center, Iowa.last_img read more

Moyes delighted by battling United

first_img Disappointed Stoke boss Hughes believes his side deserved to hang on for at least a point after an heroic effort to end a winless run at Old Trafford stretching back to 1976. Hughes said: “I do think it was unjust, in terms of what we produced, the effort we put in and the chances we created. “I certainly felt in the first half we could have been three or 4-1 to the good in terms of chances created. I didn’t think United created much apart from the key moments that took the game away from us. “We’re really disappointed given the level of performance we produced. We had a game plan which needed commitment, it needed people to be brave and do the hard yards that affected the game, and that’s what we did. “I thought my players were excellent, they took the game to United and really shook them.” David Moyes hailed the fighting spirit of his Manchester United side as they twice hit back from behind to beat Stoke 3-2 in an Old Trafford thriller. But Moyes’ substitutions paid off with Hernandez providing the inspiration for United when he headed home Patrice Evra’s cross just two minutes after Rooney had flicked his side back level. Moyes said: “I thought with 15 to 20 minutes to go the supporters were terrific – they drove the team on and they played a big part in getting the result. “I thought in the end we had to go for it. I thought we did a lot of good things but an awful lot of really poor things that put us in the situation we were in. “We got ourselves back in the game just before half-time only to concede from a poor, poor free-kick. “That got us going in at half-time on a downer but I said at half-time your job is to win the game and you’re more than capable of doing it. We needed the substitutes and they made a big difference.” Moyes’ relief was evident after a tumultuous first period in which the visitors attacked with strength and purpose and ought to have extended their lead, Crouch spooning over the bar and Jonathan Walters bringing a brilliant save out of David De Gea. Moyes added: “We needed our goalkeeper to make an extraordinary save again in the first half but that’s what he’s in the team for. “At times our play was good but we just couldn’t find the final ball. But the three centre forwards we had on the pitch scored a goal and that was pleasing.” Late goals from Wayne Rooney and substitute Javier Hernandez ensured Moyes’ men narrowly avoided more disappointment after recent home setbacks against West Brom and Southampton. Mark Hughes’ visitors had made a mockery of their paltry goalscoring record so far this season by taking a third-minute lead through Peter Crouch and going straight back in front through a Marko Arnautovic free-kick after Robin van Persie had equalised for the home side. Press Associationlast_img read more