Listen To Phish Bassist Mike Gordon’s New Single “Steps”

first_imgAs we eagerly await the start of Phish‘s summer tour this weekend at Chicago’s Northerly Island, bassist Mike Gordon has quietly released the first single from his upcoming as-of-yet unnamed fifth studio album. The punchy pop ditty, “Steps,” has a similar feel to the stronger selections from Gordon’s last solo album, 2014’s Overstep. In a post on his Facebook page, Gordon’s guitarist and songwriting partner, Scott Murawski (Max Creek), confirmed that “Steps” is the first single from the new Mike Gordon album. Mike’s current touring band features Murawski, as well as drummer John Kimock, percussionist Craig Myers and keyboardist Robert Walter. You can listen to “Steps” via Spotify below:The new tune comes on the heels of a handful of high-profile festival dates early this summer, including Summer Camp and High Sierra. You can see the art for the single below. As of now, it is unclear whether this is the art for the full album, or just for this single. While official info about the new album is still unannounced, we can now enjoy a new track from Gordon as we await the start of Phish tour.…And speaking of Phish tour, reports on Reddit have confirmed that the band was testing out their 2017 touring rigs this past weekend at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee. Gordon also posted a photo from rehearsals last week.[h/t – JamBase][Cover photo via Steve Rose Photos]Don’t miss all the incredible late-night shows surrounding Phish‘s upcoming “Baker’s Dozen” run at New York City’s Madison Square Garden, from July 22nd – August 5th, including shows from Spafford, The Werks, The Motet, Circles Around The Sun, Turkuaz, Greensky Bluegrass,  Marco Benevento, Twiddle, James Brown Dance Party (ft. members of Trey Anastasio Band, Vulfpeck, James Brown’s Band, and more), Eric Krasno Band, Brandon “Taz” Niederauer Band, Check out Our Official Guide To Baker’s Dozen Late-Nights for all the info.last_img read more

Before the Big Bang

first_img Researcher sketches findings of NASA study of how zero gravity affects the body Most everybody is familiar with the Big Bang — the notion that an impossibly hot, dense universe exploded into the one we know today. But what do we know about what came before?In the quest to resolve several puzzles discovered in the initial condition of the Big Bang, scientists have developed a number of theories to describe the primordial universe, the most successful of which — known as cosmic inflation — describes how the universe dramatically expanded in size in a fleeting fraction of a second right before the Big Bang.But as successful as the inflationary theory has been, controversies have led to active debates over the years.Some researchers have developed very different theories to explain the same experimental results that have supported the inflationary theory so far. In some of these theories, the primordial universe was contracting instead of expanding, and the Big Bang was thus a part of a Big Bounce.Some researchers — including Avi Loeb, the Frank B. Baird, Jr. Professor of Science and chair of the Astronomy Department — have raised concerns about the theory, suggesting that its seemingly endless adaptability makes it all but impossible to test.“The current situation for inflation is that it’s such a flexible idea … it cannot be falsified experimentally,” Loeb said. “No matter what result of the observable people set out to measure would turn out to be, there are always some models of inflation that can explain it.” Therefore,  experiments can only help to nail down some model details within the framework of the inflationary theory, but cannot test the validity of the framework itself. However, falsifiability should be a hallmark of any scientific theory.That’s where Xingang Chen comes in.Xingang Chen is one of the authors of a new study that examines what the universe looked like before the Big Bang. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerA senior lecturer in astronomy, Chen and his collaborators for many years have been developing the idea of using something he called a “primordial standard clock” as a probe of the primordial universe. Together with Loeb and Zhong-Zhi Xianyu, a postdoctoral researcher in the Physics Department, Chen applied this idea to the noninflationary theories after he learned about an intense debate in 2017 that questioned whether inflationary theories make any predictions at all. In a paper published as an Editor’s Suggestion in Physical Review Letters, the team laid out a method that may be used to falsify the inflationary theory experimentally.In an effort to find some characteristic that can separate inflation from other theories, the team began by identifying the defining property of the various theories — the evolutionary history of the size of the primordial universe. “For example, during inflation, by definition the size of the universe grows exponentially,” Xianyu said. “In some alternative theories, the size of the universe contracts — in some very slowly and in some very fast.“The conventional observables people have proposed so far have trouble distinguishing the different theories because these observables are not directly related to this property,” he continued. “So we wanted to find what the observables are that can be linked to that defining property.”The signals generated by the primordial standard clock can serve this purpose.That clock, Chen said, is any type of massively heavy elementary particle in the energetic primordial universe. Such particles should exist in any theory, and they oscillate at some regular frequency, much like the swaying of a clock’s pendulum.The primordial universe was not entirely uniform. Quantum fluctuations became the seeds of the large-scale structure of today’s universe and one key source of information physicists rely on to learn about what happened before the Big Bang. The theory outlined by Chen suggests that ticks of the standard clock generated signals that were imprinted into the structure of those fluctuations. And because standard clocks in different primordial universes would leave different patterns of signals, Chen said, they may be able to determine which theory of the primordial universe is most accurate.“If we imagine all the information we learned so far about what happened before the Big Bang is in a roll of film frames, then the standard clock tells us how these frames should be played,” Chen explained. “Without any clock information, we do not know if the film should be played forward or backward, fast or slow — just like we are not sure if the primordial universe was inflating or contracting, and how fast it did that. This is where the problem lies. The standard clock put time stamps on each of these frames when the film was shot before the Big Bang, and tells us what this film is about.”The team calculated how these standard clock signals should look in noninflationary theories, and suggested how to search for them in astrophysical observations. “If a pattern of signals representing a contracting universe were found,” Xianyu said, “it would falsify the entire inflationary theory, regardless of what detailed models one constructs.”The success of this idea lies in experimentation. “These signals will be very subtle to detect,” Chen said. “Our proposal is that there should be some kind of massive fields that have generated these imprints and we computed their patterns, but we don’t know how large the overall amplitude of these signals is. It may be that they are very faint and very hard to detect, so that means we will have to search in many different places.“The cosmic microwave background radiation is one place,” he continued. “The distribution of galaxies is another. We have already started to search for these signals and there are some interesting candidates already, but we still need more data.”This research was supported with funding from the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard University and the Center of Mathematical Sciences and Applications, Harvard University. Scientists are using the universe as a ‘cosmological collider’ Paves the way for the future discovery of new physics Related Twins in space The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

New Asian art history course to encourage global awareness

first_imgNotre Dame will be offering its first-ever art history course focused on Asia during the spring semester. The course, titled “Introduction to Arts of Asia: Materials, Processes, Contexts,” is being offered by the Liu Institute for Asian Studies and through the Keough School of Global Affairs. Thirty seats are assigned to the class, two of which are reserved for Asian Studies majors while the rest are open to students of all majors.The course will be taught by visiting professorial specialist Fletcher Coleman. Coleman is a joint fellow at the Liu Institute and the Department of Art History who is expecting to receive a doctorate in art history from Harvard University in 2019. Coleman, who takes a strong interest in materials and production processes in art, said the art history course will emphasize these aspects of historical artifacts.“We’ll be doing an introductory Asian art course, but unlike traditional chronologies that start from the early period and go era-by-era to the modern period, we’re going to be basing the course around modules on specific production processes related to particular historic epochs,” he said.Each module will take roughly two weeks and consist of two opening lectures, a hands-on or close-looking session and a small group discussion. Coleman said he plans on inviting several speakers — including two specialists from China — and hosting a class trip to Chicago’s Art Institute to meet with the curator of Chinese Art. The curriculum will focus on the art of China and Japan, but will include discussion of the art of Korea and Central Asia, Coleman said.“Anybody is welcome to join this course,” he said. “It requires no background in Asian studies or art history because part of what we’ll be doing, as we go along, is to more generally understand how the contexts and production of artwork reveal a lot about historical contexts. We’ll be learning together how to do close examination of artwork and develop our skills for writing generally about artwork.”Coleman encouraged students to consider the course in terms of whether or not it aligns with their major.“Things like close-looking and analysis and being able to write about more broadly what you see and encounter in the world is extremely important to many disciplines,” Coleman said. “I know, for example, medical schools often now look for students who have backgrounds in the visual arts because it can help them with, for example, diagnoses.”According to its mission statement, the Liu Institute for Asian Studies was founded in 2011 to provide “a forum for integrated and multi-disciplinary research and teaching on Asia.” Director of the Liu Institute, Michel Hockx, said the new class is part of an effort to increase coverage of Asia in the humanities at Notre Dame.“In the art history program there’s ten professors [and] only one of them, Professor Coleman, who’s just arrived, teaches about Asia,” Hockx said. “The history department has 43 faculty. Only seven teach about Asia. Thirty-three teach about Europe and America. That made sense maybe 20 or 30 years ago, but those things don’t make sense anymore. Asia’s such an important part of the world as a whole, and also so many of our students have links or roots in Asia, and so many of our students will end up working in Asia. It makes no sense anymore for what we focus on to be predominantly America and Europe. Therefore, it is part of our mission at the Liu Institute to try to encourage departments to start hiring faculty and focus on Asia.”Asia is a large part of the world right now, Hockx said, so each student should have some awareness of global culture including Asia.“Art is a wonderful way to study culture, but also to study history and religion,” Hockx said. “ … I think it’s a great opportunity for any Notre Dame student to learn something about the place that houses around 60 percent of the world population.”Tags: Asian Art History, Keough School of Global Affairs, Liu Institute, Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies.last_img read more

Lily Rabe, Hamish Linklater & John Lithgow to Headline Shakespeare in the Park

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on July 6, 2014 Related Shows This summer marks the 52nd year of free theater in Central Park. Tony nominee Lily Rabe, Hamish Linklater and Tony winner John Lithgow will headline The Public Theater’s line-up for the 2014 free Shakespeare in the Park season at the Delacorte Theater. Rabe and Linklater will star as Beatrice and Benedick respectively in Much Ado About Nothing. Lithgow will play the titular role in King Lear. View Commentscenter_img Helmed by Jack O’Brien, Much Ado About Nothing will run June 3 through July 6. Rabe’s Broadway credits include Seminar, The Merchant of Venice (for which she received a Tony nomination), The American Plan, Heartbreak House and Steel Magnolias. Her screen credits include All Good Things, No Reservations, Mona Lisa Smile, American Horror Story, The Good Wife and Nip/Tuck. Her upcoming films include Pawn Sacrifice and Mockingjay. Linklater’s stage credits include Seminar, The Comedy of Errors, Twelfth Night, Hamlet and The School for Lies. His screen credits include 42, The Angriest Man in Brooklyn, Battleship, The Future, The Crazy Ones ,The Good Wife, The Newsroom, The Big C and the upcoming Magic in the Moonlight. Much Ado About Nothing Directed by Daniel Sullivan, King Lear will play July 22 through August 17. Lithgow received Tony awards for his performances in Sweet Smell of Success and The Changing Room. His other Broadway credits include My Fat Friend, Comedians, Anna Christie, Once in a Lifetime, Spokesong, Bedroom Farce, Requiem for a Heavyweight, The Front Page, M. Butterfly, Beyond Therapy, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, All My Sons and The Columnist. His screen credits include All That Jazz, Terms of Endearment, Footloose, Shrek, This Is 40 and Dexter.last_img read more

U.S. solar installations top 2 million mark, capacity hits 70GW

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:The number of solar installations in the United States has officially surpassed 2 million, according to the latest data from Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). The milestone comes just three years after the industry completed its 1 millionth installation, a feat that took 40 years to achieve.Wood Mackenzie analysts expect the U.S. to crack the 3 million mark in 2021 and 4 million in 2023.“The rapid growth in the solar industry has completely reshaped the energy conversation in this country,” said Abigail Ross-Hopper, president and CEO of trade group SEIA. “This $17 billion industry is on track to double again in five years, and we believe that the 2020s will be the decade that solar becomes the dominant new form of energy generation.”California was central to the market’s early years and remains a critical leg today, but its importance is diminishing as other state markets grow up. California accounted for 51 percent of the first million installations but 43 percent of the second million.Success in acquiring more customers, and at lower costs, will determine how quickly the industry installs its next million systems — and at what price. Largely due to the challenges of customer acquisition cost, Wood Mackenzie forecasts residential growth at just 3.3 percent in 2019.The 2 million solar systems currently installed, which represent more than 70 gigawatts of capacity, provide enough electricity for around 12 million homes. But that’s just a fraction of U.S. buildings. According to the Census Bureau, in July 2017 the U.S. had 137.4 million “housing units,” a figure that includes apartments as well as single-family homes, but doesn’t count businesses, manufacturing and other commercial buildings.More: U.S. surpasses 2 million solar installations as industry looks to ‘dominate’ the 2020s U.S. solar installations top 2 million mark, capacity hits 70GWlast_img read more

Martinelli Assures the FARC Controlled 25% of Panamanian Jungle

first_img The FARC is currently involved in negotiations with Juan Manuel Santos’ government, in order to put an end to more than 40 years of violence. Panama seized about 35 tons of drugs in 2012, while 39 tons were confiscated in 2011, although most seizures were made in 2009 and 2010, with 54 tons each year, official records showed. “We are forced to confront a new generation of organized and sophisticated criminals that disrespect law and constitutionality,” said the head of state. The Darien area has always been a conflict area for Panama, not only due to guerrilla presence, but also due to drug trafficking operations. “When I took office in 2009, 25% of the Darien area was under FARC control,” Martinelli said during a speech before the Panamanian Congress, adding, “today I can assure you that Panama has 100% sovereignty over its territory.” Martinelli stated that “criminal organization proliferated because of weak state institutions” and added that most countries in the region are facing a “dramatic increase in violence, crime and the presence of organized crime.” By Dialogo July 08, 2013 According to official figures, 80% of the cocaine that enters the United States does so through Central America, and comes from South America. During a joint operation that was conducted in that area with the Colombian Army on June 18, Panama destroyed about 5,000 coca plants, as well as a lab for processing these plants into cocaine. On July 1, Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli stated that the guerrilla group Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), was in control of 25% of the Darien jungle in 2009, a Panamanian area on the border with Colombia. Panamanian authorities consider that drug smuggling in their waters has decreased due to law enforcement presence and from ‘Operation Martillo’, a multinational counter drug effort launched by the United States and Central America in January 2012.last_img read more

Easy to find application wants to be a better, more detailed and informative domestic tourist “Google Maps”

first_imgAll the trends say one thing – the focus is on the mobile phone, which will soon, if not already, become the main object in our lives and the only thing we can’t do without. Soon, the mobile phone will become the main means of payment, identification, the medium – we can do without everything, but we cannot do without a mobile phone, and the only object that is with us all the time.Thus, in tourism, through various applications and social networks, the mobile phone is used for taking pictures, recording videos, communicating on social networks, navigating and source of information, etc.… On the other hand in tourism, but in a more detailed, broader and informative way. It is an Easy to Find application whose goal is easier and simpler navigation in tourist destinations, ie in a new environment where tourists find themselves when they come to Croatia, which is completely unknown to them because they are in the destination for the first time.The question is what the destination offers, from tourist to all other useful information, from post office, shops, pharmacy, service, gas stations, course… but also all additional information about everyone, not just markers on the map to get as fast as possible, more precisely, in more detail the user could find his way in the new environment and get all the necessary information in one place.As Boris Stoilkovski, one of the founders, points out, the Easy to find application offers everything we need and the whole of Croatia in the palm of your hand, thus eliminating the need for various maps, navigation and various applications separate by city. “The goal of the application is for every person in an unfamiliar environment (as well as in a familiar one) to find his way as quickly as possible and reach the desired goal in the fastest appropriate way. In addition to mapping all possible places and locations, the application also includes hiking, biking and hiking trails, and we offer the possibility of virtual tourist routes (virtual walks) and much more.”Boris Stoilkovski points out.The idea of ​​the application is to make it possible for users to have all possible information about the desired location in one place. “In other words, there is no need to use multiple apps for different cities, timetables, oil prices, accommodation rentals, etc. because the Easy to Find app covers absolutely everything, with only the tourist aspect of our country in mind.”Boris Stoilkovski points out.At first, the association is on Google Maps (GM), but Stoilkovski points out that they do not like the comparison with GM because they look much wider and that they were not guided by their business model.The content of Google Maps is defined, so we do not compare with them. However, our willingness to support innovative ideas and load different content into the application, makes us more flexible in relation to them. Thus, we opened the question of the advantages of our application, and that is that its content changes as the actual situation on the ground changes. A kind of goal is to encourage our users to upload content themselves, thus making it easier for everyone to navigate.. “Pointed out Stoilkovski and added that this is a start-up company and a newer application, and that they are currently approaching a thousand users, which is very good in a relatively short time, without advertising and the beta phase. The application is in beta and should be ready for full implementation in two to three years, when they plan to completely map the whole of Croatia.There is a long and difficult road to the end of mapping and entering all the details in front of Stoilkovski and the whole team, but, as they point out, their goal is not instant earnings but a quality and stable solution and they are looking at the long term. Step by step, they diligently map the whole of Croatia and fill in all possible data about all destinations, which are actually the most valuable that the application will offer and what Google Maps does not have or “can” have – accurate, detailed and freshly localized information about the entire destination.Just go ahead and stay awake, because until yesterday they laughed at various “new kids”, and today Facebook is the largest medium in the world and they do not generate their content, Uber has become the largest taxi carrier without a single taxi in its ownership, Alibaba is the largest a store without warehouses and goods in its ownership, and Airbnb the largest accommodation provider and does not own a single property.If you have an Android device you can see / download it here – https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.easy.it.find.easytofind02last_img read more

Inner City

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Government to offer $62.3b in bonds in H2 to finance coronavirus fight

first_imgIndonesia is preparing to offer Rp 900.4 trillion (US$62.35 billion) worth of sovereign debt papers (SBN) in the second half of the year as debt financing swells significantly to fund the country’s coronavirus response.The government had raised Rp 630.5 trillion worth of SBN as of June this year, including $4.3 billion from a three-tranche United States dollar denominated bond in April and $2.5 billion from a three-tranche global sukuk (sharia-compliant bond) last month, according to the Finance Ministry’s financing strategy and portfolio director, Riko Amir.“The market will not be able to absorb all of the Rp 900.4 trillion worth of bonds and therefore there will be a burden sharing scheme between the government and Bank Indonesia,” Riko said in a discussion on Thursday. The government, he went on to say, was still in negotiations with the central bank on the details of the scheme. The central bank and the government are set to sign an agreement on a bond sale program worth Rp 574 trillion at zero interest or below the market rate of 7 percent, which will be the largest debt monetization program among developing economies.Read also: Indonesia raises $930m in samurai bonds to fund pandemic responseUnder the agreement, Bank Indonesia (BI) will buy Rp 397.6 trillion worth of bonds with zero yields for healthcare and social safety net programs, among other things.The central bank will also purchase Rp 123.4 trillion worth of bonds with a 3.25 percent yield to fund relief programs for small and medium businesses as well as Rp 53.57 trillion worth of bonds to rescue big businesses with a 4.25 percent interest rate, the current benchmark rate. “BI is ready to share the burden not only in the financing efforts but also those related to the debts,” BI Governor Perry Warjiyo told lawmakers on Monday, adding that the scheme would ease the government’s burden for paying higher interest rates as a result of the widening deficit.The central bank has already been buying government bonds in auctions, although in small portions, to help finance the government’s spending. BI has so far bought Rp 30.33 trillion in government bonds directly at auctions and bought another Rp 166.2 trillion of bonds in the secondary market to help stabilize the country’s currency.Under an emergency law issued by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak’s economic impacts, BI is allowed to buy government bonds directly at auctions. Previously, the central bank could only buy the debt papers on the secondary market.The government is facing the daunting task of borrowing Rp 1.53 quadrillion this year to fund the budget deficit, which is expected to reach 6.34 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), as well to finance investments and repay its debts.Read also: Administrative issues hamper COVID-19 budget disbursement: Sri MulyaniThis is an increase from a previous borrowing needs projection of Rp 1.4 quadrillion announced by the government in April, as it has now allocated Rp 695.2 trillion budget to strengthen the healthcare system and bolster the economy amid the pandemic.According to the ministry’s presentation materials, the borrowing needs will increase the country’s debt-to-GDP ratio to around 37.64 to 38.5 percent by the end of year from around 30 percent in 2019.“We will maintain the debt ratio within the safe limit of below 60 percent of GDP and we will be prudent in managing the debts while also supporting the countercyclical policies,” said Riko.The coronavirus pandemic has ravaged the country’s economy as the government now expects a full year growth of only 1 percent under a baseline scenario or a 0.4 percent contraction under a worst-case scenario.Topics :last_img read more

Governor Wolf Statement on Emergence of a Case of MCR-1 in Pennsylvania

first_img Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today issued a statement about the emergence of a case of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance (mcr-1) in Pennsylvania:“We have learned about a human case of mcr-1 in a Pennsylvania resident, and my administration, through the Department of Health, immediately began working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as well as the United States Department of Defense (DOD), to coordinate an appropriate and collaborative response between federal, state, and local entities. We are taking the emergence of this resistance gene very seriously and we will take necessary actions to prevent mcr-1 from becoming a widespread problem with potentially serious consequences. The safety of Pennsylvanians is our utmost priority.”Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf May 26, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Governor Wolf Statement on Emergence of a Case of MCR-1 in Pennsylvanialast_img read more